Questions tagged [possessives]

Questions about the possessive, one of several constructions that describe ownership or association between two objects.

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34 views

What kind of noun is the 'Royal College of Surgeons'?

Would it just be considered a compound noun or is there another name for it? And even though surgeons is plural, would it still take 's to make the possessive (i.e. the Royal College of Surgeons's ...
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33 views

Double possessive when thing possessed is plural

"This year we planned a cruise with four friends of ours." I've only ever seen a double possessive with words that are singular. For example, "I am a friend of Bob's" or "It's the password of Mark's."...
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169 views

"X dollars' worth of Y" construction with "USD"

My question is similar to "Dollars' worth" vs. "dollars worth" for numerals but for numerals that are followed by a currency abbreviation. When it's spelled out, it's clear ...
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13 views

I'm starting a carpet repair business and my name is Chris. Is Chris's Carpet Repair correct? [duplicate]

Is Chris's Carpet Repair correct or should it be Chris' Carpet Repair?
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52 views

Would it be correct to say that "whose" is "the only interrogative possessive pronoun"?

I am creating a crossword puzzle for submission to a newspaper. For the entry WHOSE, would it be correct to say "The only interrogative possessive pronoun" as the clue? Would pedantic solvers approve ...
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89 views

Which one of the following sentences is more correct?

"Maria's, Mary's and Sophia's first loves was Katarina. "Katarina was Maria's, Mary's and Sophia's first loves​" "The first love of Maria's, Mary's and Sophia's was Katarina."
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28 views

Can you use the possessive with the word "rest"?

For example, A group of 12 was trekking through the woods. Sarah's tent was all rolled up nicely. The rest's weren't.
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1answer
107 views

Is this possessive optional? How would it affect the meaning of the sentence?

I'm writing an English piece as part of an assignment for our class, but I was unsure whether to add an apostrophe here: I went to see the Arctic Monkeys concert last week. or I went to see the ...
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2answers
2k views

Is it "childs" or "child's" [closed]

I am making a website to manage homework for students, parents and teachers. Anyway, I want the grammar to be correct and was wondering what would be the correct way to say this: All of your child's ...
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46 views

Is it right to add possessive verb?

Every illness is a story, and Annie Page’s began with the kinds of small, unexceptional details that mean nothing until seen in hindsight. I will like to check if there is any grammatical error in ...
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1answer
568 views

What is the proper written plural possessive form for nouns that do not take -s, -es, or -ses upon pluralisation?

For most English words, the rules for construction of possessive forms are fairly simple. Singular nouns are possessivised by adding -’s to the end (even if the word already ends with an S):1 cat → ...
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3answers
102 views

Which one is correct "United's stadium" or "United' stadium"? [closed]

What is the correct way to put the apostrophe. the doubt is with "stadium" because it starts with 's'. E.g: "United's stadium" or "United' stadium" PS: I need to know why (with grammatical ...
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1answer
68 views

Are both these sentences grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I have recently found the following. I do know the first sentence is wrong. (1) "I am not a fan of him." Meaning : I am not his fan. (2) I am not a fan of his. Meaning : I am not one of his ...
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66 views

the company failure to comply vs the company's failure

I got into an argument with a British native speaker over the following phrase: 'the company failure to comply with its contractual obligations' I'm a non-native speaker, therefore I can't be quite ...
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3answers
54 views

Correct the sentence

Are they your books ? Yes they are mine . Is this correct or should it be are these your books?
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49 views

Which one is correct in formal style? Why?

1) It's a habit of mine. 2) He’s a brother of Maria’s. 3) My salary is higher than that of Joe. 4) My salary is higher than that of Joe's 5) My salary is higher than that of theirs. 6) My ...
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244 views

The difference between compound words and genitive cases

I have a problem with genitive cases and compound words, I don't understand the difference between a genitive case and a compound word (noun + noun structure). I was trying to understand them by ...
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1answer
271 views

When can you omit using s after possessive nouns?

It seems that in some cases s is not used after possessive nouns, for example, you would not say Fuel's price went up instead you would say Fuel price went up. However, the sentence This car's price ...
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314 views

Which does the U.S. government use: U.S.’s or US’s?

The government of the United States punctuates our toponymic acronyms thusly: the U.S. (not US) the USA (not U.S.A.) For proof of this, you can visit usa.gov. (Note that the article is only ...
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6k views

people's mind vs people's minds?

Recently I was reading a book entitled "50 Tips to Read People’s Mind". Somewhere in the book, the writer says: These men do the seemingly impossible when they appear to be reading people's minds,...
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1answer
84 views

They didn't object to his (being given a second chance)

a. They objected to my being given a second chance, but not to his being given a second chance. Can you omit the second verb phrase being given a second chance as in (b)? b. They objected to my ...
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1answer
81 views

English possessive for a name that ends in an apostrophe (in this case, in transliterated Ukrainian)?

I am an editor editing a book review, and I'm not sure how to deal with this: Serhii Bilokin’’s book The author has chosen to transliterate with the apostrophe at the end of the name, but it looks ...
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1answer
51 views

Possessive case. Forming rules

Which one is correct? And why? Thanks The Wright brothers made their official public flight in 1908 and amazed the world with their (aeroplane’s / aeroplane) flying ability.
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39 views

What is the appropriate usage of this Who's and What's to imply possession of a property [duplicate]

Consider the following sentences: Please consider the person who's shirt is red. Please consider the car what's bumper is blue. Please consider the car who's bumper is blue. Number 3 sounds wrong ...
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64 views

Concisely wording the sentence "compare X's Y to Z's Y"

How would one go about concisely wording the sentence "compare X's Y to Z's Y." I've seen it done in a few ways: "compare X's Y to Z's Y" (e.g. "compare Mary's lamb to Phillip's lamb") "compare X's Y ...
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4answers
142 views

Confusing "it's" with "its" [closed]

Why do anglophones confuse "it's" with "its" so much often? I mean, I can understand if it's a distraction mistake but I don't know if this is still a mistake or has become an actual rule to put "it's"...
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153 views

How does one write the possessive of "Elizabeth II" or similar usages?

Monarchs are often identified by Roman numerals, as in "Henry VIII" or "Elizabeth II". How does one write the possessive for this usage? "Elizabeth II's" looks right but feels somehow wrong, as if it ...
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1answer
103 views

when to use plural or singular form of genitive/possessive noun phrases for item of individuals in group

Phrases like "our passport[s]" that refer to an item owned by members of a group (where each individual has one and the group collectively has multiple) are sometimes expressed in plural or singular ...
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88 views

Plural possessive of the acronym COA

How do I write the plural possessive of the acronym COA in APA style (which in general doesn't allow for the use of an apostrophe)? COA = children orphaned by AIDS Children orphaned by AIDS [...
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31 views

Sales Price vs Sale's Price [duplicate]

So, everything I see seems to indicate that "sales price" is the correct way to refer to the price that one pays for a house or similar type of property. However, would it not be better as "sale's ...
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28 views

State of Being verbs as gerunds preceded by possessive

I have been trying to untangle whether, in the following sentence, the apostrophe -s is necessary "He complains about his feet ('s) hurting." Apologies if the title isn't accurate or precise. I'm ...
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2answers
110 views

Possessive apostrophe in this case (company listing designs in a particular range)

If a company called Peter Jones (made up name!) has a range called Peter's Pals on their site and then wants to list the designs like this: Peter's Pals Designs Is this correct? Should it be Peter's ...
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48 views

Masters or Master's (for my specific situation) [duplicate]

I'm going to apply for the statistics graduate school at UCSB. So is it okay to say I am the "Applicant for UCSB Statistics Master"? Or any suggestions about other forms, like "UCSB Masters Applicant" ...
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1answer
66 views

Appropriate Use of Possessive Plurals?

We have a debate on whether it should be "classes" or "classes'" in the sentence below. Your wisdom is appreciated. Sentence: This rebalancing of customer classes’ impacts on the system means there ...
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2answers
3k views

Why is the apostrophe positioned differently in "ones' complement" than "two's complement"? [duplicate]

There is a concept in computer science which deals with how to demonstrate negative binary numbers. Two methods for achieving this goal are ones' complement and two's complement. Since I got ...
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1answer
53 views

Possessive function of a business name which is made with a possessive

Garner's fourth edition, page 714, states regarding the name McDonald’s It is quite defensible to write McDonald’s dinner combos (the name functioning as a kind of possessive) On what grounds ...
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3answers
34 views

Going to a place possessive term

If I am going to a place named Coco (it's a bubble tea place), do I say I am going to Coco, or I am going to Coco's? What is the use of the possessive term if it's a place?
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234 views

Apostrophe 's, "of", or nothing to show possession/ownership?

Let's go straight forward, the subject is NOT using 's or of, but why sometime we should show possession/ownership using 's or of, why sometime not ? Examples: The family name = the name of the ...
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152 views

users´ needs or users needs

Which one of the following is right/ better. I am still not sure after thinking about it for quite a while now. I am talking about the needs of multiple users. The first option (s´) is used when ...
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30 views

A two weeks’ notice is - should the indefinite article truly be there? [duplicate]

As far as I know, when the possesive is used, I really should not use articles because it would bind to the same noun. E.g.: A two-day trip Two day's trip However, I have just found a site which ...
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1answer
836 views

Why does English employ double possessive pronouns such as theirs and ours?

I am a native speaker of AmE. I understand when and where to use their vs theirs, etc. etc. (i.e. Don't migrate this to ELL!). I've searched the site and google, and I have not quite seen an answer ...
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556 views

Which are right: "I lost one of my friend’s phone number" Or "I lost one of my friends’ phone number" [closed]

Which of these is grammatically correct: A - I lost one of my friend’s phone number Or B - I lost one of my friends’ phone number They appeared on a grammar test in a classroom, and the teacher ...
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1answer
144 views

Genitives of ancient names [duplicate]

I've read (in the Elements of Style) that, while genitives of names ending in ‘s’ may have an additional ‘s’, as in "Ross’s", this oughtn't to be done with ancient names: Exceptions are the ...
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1answer
502 views

Indicating Possession Between You and Another Person

Is there a good way to indicate that something belongs to you and another person when you want to mention the other person by name? As an example, suppose some friends ask you "Where's the party at?" ...
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1answer
300 views

the + country name (genitive case)?

For country names that warrant the use of the definite article (US, UK, UAE, etc.), is the definite article required in the genitive case as well? Abu Dhabi holds 94% of the UAE's oil reserves Abu ...
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3k views

adults’ English teacher or adult’s English teacher? [duplicate]

In this sentence, “I would like to apply for the post of adults’ English teacher,” do you say “adults’ English teacher” or “adult’s English teacher”? If this sentence is totally wrong, could you ...
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219 views

'my picture' - ownership vs. depiction

Consider the sentences: Take my picture [handing over a frame] Take my picture [handing over a camera] (Photo vs. picture being insignificant - a more contrived example could avoid it; as is the ...
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2answers
388 views

How do we use the possessive case (i.e., 's) with "or"?

I'm having a hard time finding out what the grammar is when we want to use "or" and possessive. If, for example, I want to refer to the information of a person or an organization, do I say, "that ...
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1answer
64 views

Can I use "who" after a possessive?

Example: I punched the man's nose, who cried in pain. I just feel like it's refering to the nose instead of the man, even though the meaning is clear.
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178 views

Can possessives in the middle of a word exist?

According to one online dictionary, the apostrophe-s combination is an ending used in writing to represent the possessive morpheme after most singular nouns, some plural nouns, especially those not ...

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