Questions tagged [possessives]

Questions about the possessive, one of several constructions that describe ownership or association between two objects.

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1answer
79 views

Is this possessive optional? How would it affect the meaning of the sentence?

I'm writing an English piece as part of an assignment for our class, but I was unsure whether to add an apostrophe here: I went to see the Arctic Monkeys concert last week. or I went to see the ...
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2answers
141k views

Plural possessive with separate possessions

When we refer to a house that belongs to a family, we say "family's house". Pluralizing family gives us "families". Referring to the houses of several families, we say "families' houses". Forming the ...
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1answer
13k views

How to write the “plural of plural”?

I'm always confused how to write a "something of something else" in English, especially when plural is involved. For example, what would be the correct way to write the following sentences in English: ...
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2answers
58 views

Is it “childs” or “child's” [closed]

I am making a website to manage homework for students, parents and teachers. Anyway, I want the grammar to be correct and was wondering what would be the correct way to say this: All of your child's ...
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0answers
45 views

Is it right to add possessive verb?

Every illness is a story, and Annie Page’s began with the kinds of small, unexceptional details that mean nothing until seen in hindsight. I will like to check if there is any grammatical error in ...
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1answer
4k views

Use of an apostrophe in place values of a number

In mathematics, when you’re discussing the concepts behind different number bases, it’s often necessary to refer to a digit's place. For example, for the number 217 (in base 10, i.e., the number ...
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1answer
63 views

Concisely wording the sentence “compare X's Y to Z's Y”

How would one go about concisely wording the sentence "compare X's Y to Z's Y." I've seen it done in a few ways: "compare X's Y to Z's Y" (e.g. "compare Mary's lamb to Phillip's lamb") "compare X's Y ...
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1answer
119 views

What is the proper written plural possessive form for nouns that do not take -s, -es, or -ses upon pluralisation?

For most English words, the rules for construction of possessive forms are fairly simple. Singular nouns are possessivised by adding -’s to the end (even if the word already ends with an S):1 cat → ...
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3answers
81 views

Which one is correct “United's stadium” or “United' stadium”? [closed]

What is the correct way to put the apostrophe. the doubt is with "stadium" because it starts with 's'. E.g: "United's stadium" or "United' stadium" PS: I need to know why (with grammatical ...
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1answer
40 views

Are both these sentences grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I have recently found the following. I do know the first sentence is wrong. (1) "I am not a fan of him." Meaning : I am not his fan. (2) I am not a fan of his. Meaning : I am not one of his ...
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1answer
111 views

possessives and number (sing./pl) [duplicate]

I'm revising a text containing these two sentences: a) Students’ sex was coded by using their first names. b) Students’ birthday was self-reported in the survey. I'm sure the correct ...
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1answer
55 views

the company failure to comply vs the company's failure

I got into an argument with a British native speaker over the following phrase: 'the company failure to comply with its contractual obligations' I'm a non-native speaker, therefore I can't be quite ...
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1answer
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Why do we say a “hotel room” and not a “hotel's room”? [closed]

I would like to know what the rule is to explain why we do not use the genitive construction hotel's room. Instead, we say "a hotel room". Other examples: a hospital bed a bike stand Would it ...
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3answers
53 views

Correct the sentence

Are they your books ? Yes they are mine . Is this correct or should it be are these your books?
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3answers
96k views

Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe?

Many questions already ask about this topic (What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in "‑s"? , When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑...
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0answers
35 views

Which one is correct in formal style? Why?

1) It's a habit of mine. 2) He’s a brother of Maria’s. 3) My salary is higher than that of Joe. 4) My salary is higher than that of Joe's 5) My salary is higher than that of theirs. 6) My ...
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6answers
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Can one explain the different distributions of the Saxon and the analytic (Norman) (periphrastic, 'of') genitive

I gave a quick answer to part of this question which had not been covered by previous answers, trying to clarify the reason you would say time of decoding but not decoding’s time. I said it was ’s ...
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7answers
4k views

Mother love or mother's love?

I found the following lines from a book written on philosophy: "The love of a mother for her child is neither Buddhist nor Christian: it is mother love." Is it possible to express "mother love" as it ...
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0answers
30 views

Should [noun] of [determiner] [pronoun]' e.g. “request of my sister” have a possessive?

I was reading a translated book and it used the sentence: "I could never refuse a request of my elder sister's." When I look at the above sentence I feel it should be written as: "I could never ...
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2answers
9k views

What is the plural of the name Jess? [duplicate]

I understand it's grammatically correct to use apostrophe s for the plural of letters. Dot your i's and cross your t's. But not for proper nouns that end with s. Here come the Jones's Joneses. ...
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2answers
167 views

Determining the stressed word in a sentence when using possessive

In the following sentence, which word should receive the stress: This is the dog’s collar. I fully understand that in different contexts, different words will be stressed. But I’m asking about the ...
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1answer
65 views

They didn't object to his (being given a second chance)

a. They objected to my being given a second chance, but not to his being given a second chance. Can you omit the second verb phrase being given a second chance as in (b)? b. They objected to my ...
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0answers
82 views

The difference between compound words and genitive cases

I have a problem with genitive cases and compound words, I don't understand the difference between a genitive case and a compound word (noun + noun structure). I was trying to understand them by ...
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1answer
59 views

When can you omit using s after possessive nouns?

It seems that in some cases s is not used after possessive nouns, for example, you would not say Fuel's price went up instead you would say Fuel price went up. However, the sentence This car's price ...
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0answers
136 views

Which does the U.S. government use: U.S.’s or US’s?

The government of the United States punctuates our toponymic acronyms thusly: the U.S. (not US) the USA (not U.S.A.) For proof of this, you can visit usa.gov. (Note that the article is only ...
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1answer
2k views

people's mind vs people's minds?

Recently I was reading a book entitled "50 Tips to Read People’s Mind". Somewhere in the book, the writer says: These men do the seemingly impossible when they appear to be reading people's minds,...
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1answer
52 views

English possessive for a name that ends in an apostrophe (in this case, in transliterated Ukrainian)?

I am an editor editing a book review, and I'm not sure how to deal with this: Serhii Bilokin’’s book The author has chosen to transliterate with the apostrophe at the end of the name, but it looks ...
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1answer
45 views

Possessive case. Forming rules

Which one is correct? And why? Thanks The Wright brothers made their official public flight in 1908 and amazed the world with their (aeroplane’s / aeroplane) flying ability.
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1answer
3k views

“during one of my girlfriend's games”

I was trying to say "During one of my girlfriend's soccer games..." The problem is when I spoke it, it could be interpreted as "Out of all of my girlfriends... during one of their games this ...
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0answers
37 views

What is the appropriate usage of this Who's and What's to imply possession of a property [duplicate]

Consider the following sentences: Please consider the person who's shirt is red. Please consider the car what's bumper is blue. Please consider the car who's bumper is blue. Number 3 sounds wrong ...
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19 views

Company name Chas' vs Chas's [duplicate]

I'm starting a company and have a company name. It's called Chas' Painting. I was wondering is it Chas's or Chas'? I want to make sure I get this right before I go all out and have to correct it later....
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1answer
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Attributive or Possessive noun: the Dell Company's staff. or the Dell Company staff? [duplicate]

In the following is it better to use a possessive noun with an apostrophe or an attributive noun without an apostrophe? The following list details the assumptions that have been made in ...
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4answers
128 views

Confusing “it's” with “its” [closed]

Why do anglophones confuse "it's" with "its" so much often? I mean, I can understand if it's a distraction mistake but I don't know if this is still a mistake or has become an actual rule to put "it's"...
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3answers
2k views

A noun adjunct / the possessive case

Sometimes it’s possible to use either a noun adjunct or the possessive case. the shop door the shop’s door However, in certain phrases it’s not OK to do so. the ship’s crew (the ship crew is ...
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80 views

How does one write the possessive of “Elizabeth II” or similar usages?

Monarchs are often identified by Roman numerals, as in "Henry VIII" or "Elizabeth II". How does one write the possessive for this usage? "Elizabeth II's" looks right but feels somehow wrong, as if it ...
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0answers
56 views

Plural possessive of the acronym COA

How do I write the plural possessive of the acronym COA in APA style (which in general doesn't allow for the use of an apostrophe)? COA = children orphaned by AIDS Children orphaned by AIDS [...
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0answers
6 views

Is it correct to mention a cause with a gerund preceded by a possessive? [duplicate]

Sometimes, when I want to explain the reasons for something, it seems to make more sense to use a gerund: I think that my using X caused Y. Instead of: I think Y happened because I used X. ...
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3answers
2k views

Is it ok to omit a possessive apostrophe before a capitalized appellation (President, country name, VP, PM)?

In a recent Financial Times article (Yemen PM Escapes Assissnation), the apostrophe necessary to show possession was left out. I've seen colleagues do it as well. Isn't it supposed to be "Yemen's PM ...
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0answers
29 views

Sales Price vs Sale's Price [duplicate]

So, everything I see seems to indicate that "sales price" is the correct way to refer to the price that one pays for a house or similar type of property. However, would it not be better as "sale's ...
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0answers
26 views

State of Being verbs as gerunds preceded by possessive

I have been trying to untangle whether, in the following sentence, the apostrophe -s is necessary "He complains about his feet ('s) hurting." Apologies if the title isn't accurate or precise. I'm ...
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0answers
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Masters or Master's (for my specific situation) [duplicate]

I'm going to apply for the statistics graduate school at UCSB. So is it okay to say I am the "Applicant for UCSB Statistics Master"? Or any suggestions about other forms, like "UCSB Masters Applicant" ...
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3answers
672 views

“A similar hat to Jane” vs “A hat similar to Jane’s”

Of late I have noticed British people using the following sort of construct: John and Jane make such a cute couple because John always wears a similar hat to Jane. To my ear, that is ungrammatical,...
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1answer
45 views

Appropriate Use of Possessive Plurals?

We have a debate on whether it should be "classes" or "classes'" in the sentence below. Your wisdom is appreciated. Sentence: This rebalancing of customer classes’ impacts on the system means there ...
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2answers
3k views

Why is the apostrophe positioned differently in “ones' complement” than “two's complement”? [duplicate]

There is a concept in computer science which deals with how to demonstrate negative binary numbers. Two methods for achieving this goal are ones' complement and two's complement. Since I got ...
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2answers
113 views

When can two pronouns being compared in a sentence be of different types?

I came across a sentence today - He resents your being more popular than he is I always thought that while comparing two pronouns they should always be of the same type, like, She is taller than ...
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1answer
42 views

Possessive function of a business name which is made with a possessive

Garner's fourth edition, page 714, states regarding the name McDonald’s It is quite defensible to write McDonald’s dinner combos (the name functioning as a kind of possessive) On what grounds ...
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3answers
147k views

What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in “‑s”?

What is the possessive of a noun ending in ‑s? Are these both right, or is the second one wrong? the boys' books the boss' car
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3answers
34 views

Going to a place possessive term

If I am going to a place named Coco (it's a bubble tea place), do I say I am going to Coco, or I am going to Coco's? What is the use of the possessive term if it's a place?
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1answer
130 views

Apostrophe 's, “of”, or nothing to show possession/ownership?

Let's go straight forward, the subject is NOT using 's or of, but why sometime we should show possession/ownership using 's or of, why sometime not ? Examples: The family name = the name of the ...
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5answers
91k views

“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...

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