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Questions tagged [possessives]

Questions about the possessive, one of several constructions that describe ownership or association between two objects.

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in the possessive form, a possessive pronoun refers to what? [on hold]

If a butterfly's color is white, its odds at surviving are slight can I use "its" here to refer to the butterfly?
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Verb Before Compound Noun [on hold]

We are trying to create a tagline for our department's new logo. We are unsure whether the tagline should say "Supporting Hemet teachers" or "Supporting Hemet's teachers." Hemet is the city in which ...
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1answer
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When can two pronouns being compared in a sentence be of different types?

I came across a sentence today - He resents your being more popular than he is I always thought that while comparing two pronouns they should always be of the same type, like, She is taller than ...
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Final /s/ vs /z/ sound at the end of verbs/nouns issue [duplicate]

So, I've seen this rule at several English books about how if a word has a voiced final sound (e.g. r, voiced th, l, m, n..) then added 's' is pronounced more like /z/. If the final sound is voiceless ...
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2answers
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Determining the stressed word in a sentence when using possessive

In the following sentence, which word should receive the stress: This is the dog’s collar. I fully understand that in different contexts, different words will be stressed. But I’m asking about the ...
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1answer
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Plural noun or singular noun + possessive

When the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on July 9, 1868 —150 years ago this Monday — it closed the door on schemes that aimed to make the U.S. a white man’s country. (source) I ...
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1answer
45 views

possessives and number (sing./pl)

I'm revising a text containing these two sentences: a) Students’ sex was coded by using their first names. b) Students’ birthday was self-reported in the survey, I'm sure the correct version ...
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How does one pronounce “Miles's”? [closed]

I know: this might be a duplicate. I've read the others. I'm still confused. Some people say "M-eye-lz" and others "M-eye-lzes." Are both pronunciations acceptable? Or is one colloquial while the ...
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4answers
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My friend, Adam's birthday or My friend's, Adam's birthday [duplicate]

Which one is correct? It is my friend's, Adam's birthday. It is my friend, Adam's birthday. Does the word 'friend' need an apostrophe to show possession?
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2answers
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If my grandparent is deceased, do I refer to them as “is” or “was” my grandparent?

How does this work when the person being referenced is deceased? Which of these is correct? John was my grandfather. John is my grandfather.
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3answers
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How to form possessive for a list of people? “(Jane Doe and I)'s” [duplicate]

I'm writing a sentence, and I'm not sure if it's grammatically correct. Here are my partner, Jane Doe, and I's completed assignment. Would this be alright? I never know how to properly use ...
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1answer
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with/without + pronoun (me vs. my) + gerund-participial phrase

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 461) has this section: (f) Subject of clausal complement of with/without Pronouns in this position normally appear in accusative case: [...
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4answers
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Why doesn't “its” have an apostrophe?

I know that its is the possessive and it's is the contraction, and know when to use them. But why doesn't the possessive have an apostrophe? "The bear's eating a fish." [contraction] "The bear's ...
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1answer
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2answers
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First of these's?

Say a list of things has already been mentioned. How do I refer to an attribute of the first thing in said list? "The first-of-these's attribute" "The first's attribute" edit: thanks for the ...
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2answers
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Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent “their” or “her” money buying cakes

Can you please tell me if we would use their or her as a possessive pronoun in this sentence? Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent their money buying cakes. Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent ...
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1answer
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What is the structure of “dorm room door”? Is it genitive?

I wonder where we can make genitive without 's or of. I know that using "of" in "dorm room door" might be complicated but the question is when we are allowed to make such phrases.
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1answer
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Analyzing 'genitive/accusative + V-ing phrase (gerund-participle phrase)' as different constructions

(1) I regretted [his leaving the firm]. (2) I regretted [him leaving the firm]. (3) I regretted [leaving the firm]. (4) He didn’t bother [giving me a copy]. Regarding the above ...
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3answers
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“me's” when referring to another version of you?

Let's say I want to refer to a toy that I had when I was younger. Would it be incorrect to say "young me's toy"?
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1answer
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Estonia's forests or Estonian forests? [closed]

Which use is correct in sentences such as: Estonia's state forests are managed.... The importance and role of Estonia's forests in cultural history. Estonia's forest area increased ...
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1answer
15k views

Saturday's class vs saturday class

everyone! I have a doubt about it: saturday's class x saturday class Which one is correct? I always get confused to know when I use 's when it comes to therms like these ones, when there isn't a ...
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0answers
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What I resented was [Kim mistreating my cat]. Why is [] a subordinate clause?

I intended Kim to interview both candidates. [raised object] I intended for Kim to interview both candidates. [subject] As shown above, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language analyzes an ...
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“worth” with possessive(s) in coordinated nominals

According to Garner Modern English Grammar The idiomatic possessive should be used with periods of time and statements of worth — 30 days’ notice (i.e., notice of 30 days), three days’ time, ...
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1answer
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“John and Me's ping pong game” [duplicate]

If you played someone in a game of ping pong, and wanted to refer to the game later, you could refer to it as "our game". For instance: "It was after our game." But if I were talking to a different ...
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1answer
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Why is the genitive case necessary/unecessary in the examples below?

I speak English as a second language, and I ran into something this week that I couldn't explain, even though I could understand its meaning. While reading an artcle entitled "More people now ...
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4answers
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Why use “his” in association with the word “mankind”?

The economist Keynes in a book wrote: The power to become habituated to his surroundings is a marked characteristic of mankind. I would have used "its" instead but since English is not my mother-...
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2answers
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Is apostrophe needed in this case?

Which of the following would be correct? "Improve the population quality of life" or "Improve the population's quality of life?" I could bypass this whole situation by simply using "Improve the ...
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1answer
447 views

Should I write each “team's”, “teams” or “team” captain?

I'm writing about the captains of sport teams. Each team has one and only one captain. I'm confused on how to express this : We will communicate this information to ... each team captain each team'...
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2answers
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When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive adjective/determiner? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use ...
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2answers
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Is the possessive of “one” spelled “ones” or “one's”?

I've been confused about this as long as I can remember. Should it be: One should do ones duty. or One should do one's duty. I'm guessing it should be the latter. But that doesn't sit well ...
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1answer
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Ambiguity with two possessive pronouns in a sentence

Is it clear who the first and second "their" refer to in the following sentence, or is the sentence likely to confuse the reader -- "It has been decided between the parties that party number 1 will ...
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2answers
10k views

Why use apostrophe-s to denote possession when using 'of'

Think of the simple phrase "Bill's friend". If you were going to turn this around using the preposition 'of' would you say: A friend of Bill's or A friend of Bill It appears to me that, in the US ...
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1answer
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Apostrophe Use In Abbreviated Decade Which Is Also A Possessive

I always put apostrophes before abbreviated decades. Ex: The '60s. However, what if you want to abbreviate a decade that is also possessive of the word that comes after it? Ex: Classic dance genres ...
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2answers
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“Unions' Assassins' Guild” or “Union's Assassins' Guild”?

Is it “Unions' Assassins' Guild” or “Union's Assassins' Guild”? If my English serves me correctly, I think both are right but have slightly different meanings. Can someone shed some light?
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Correct way to write this compound possessive? [duplicate]

The scenario is that both Alex and Yuval need to review the pull request. What is the correct way to write it in English? Pull request awaits Alex and Yuval reviews. Pull request awaits Alex's and ...
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0answers
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Possessive pronoun/object pronoun + Gerund

I have been thinking about this for quite a while and have done some research on it. What I have learned is that possessive pronoun+gerund is a structure that's more "formal", while object pronoun + ...
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2answers
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Grammaticality of 'that' relative clause in phrase beginning with possessive pronoun [duplicate]

I would like to ask about the grammaticality of a 'that' relative clause modifying a noun phrase that begins with a possessive pronoun. Please consider these examples: Please send in your ...
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3answers
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Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe?

Many questions already ask about this topic (What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in "‑s"? , When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑...
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Pronunciation of 's after word ending in “is”, “es”

Alexis's sister. Is it pronounced Alec sis sister or Alec sis sis sister?
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1answer
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Is “it's” or “its” possessive? [closed]

For a very long time now I've been using "it's" as the possessive form for "it". There have been some people that have said "its" is the possessive form, but I'm not sure if that's true. "It's" seems ...
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1answer
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plural possessive of Woods [closed]

How do you make the last name Woods plural possessive? example: a friend of the Woods (2 people) I assume it is Woodses, but have been "corrected" by someone.
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1answer
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how to attribute a singular property to a plural noun?

Please consider the following examples: The size/sizes of the planets is/are written here. The door/doors of a 100 houses is/are 100Kg. Men's nose/noses is/are bigger than that/those of women. Which ...
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5answers
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Adverbs modifying nouns?

1. What this question is about It is about cases where an adverb apparently modifies a word of a type that adverbs aren't supposed to be able to modify, like nouns and personal pronouns. It is very ...
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2answers
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Possessive when using a title

Which is correct: Mary Queen of Scots birthplace Mary Queen of Scots' birthplace?
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2answers
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A friend of Jane and Tom or A friend of Jane and Tom's?

We can say: She's a friend of mine. She's a friend of Tom's. She's a friend of my parents'. But today I saw this: She's a friend of Jane and Tom. Is it correct? Or should it be: She's a friend of ...
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1answer
367 views

What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Preferred way to apostrophise in case of dual or multiple ownership by distinct entities When forming the possessive of a compound noun, does one add "'s" to both or just one ...
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1answer
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“Can you send me Fred and your flight information?” [duplicate]

This doesn't quite sound right but might be right. Consider "Can you send me Fred and Amy's flight information?" This is correct via The Chicago Manual of Style. Alternatively, "Can you send me ...
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3answers
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“you,” “your” or “yours” in this sentence? [duplicate]

I just received an email that had the following sentence, We have plenty of magic that will pique your and your customers' interest. Aside from the obvious errors, do we use "you" "yours" or "...
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6answers
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Is it “John or Mary's house” or “John's or Mary's house”?

I understand that if John and Mary own a house together, it is John and Mary's house. If they jointly owned multiple houses, they would be John and Mary's houses. I also understand that if John and ...
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0answers
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Plural Possessive (With Mom and Dad's Love) [duplicate]

What is the best way to say "With Mom and Dad's Love" With Mom and Dad's Love With Mom's and Dad's Love Option 1 sounds better, but I guess you could interpret that as Mom the person and Dad's love.