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Questions tagged [possessive-vs-oblique]

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“With my/their/our V-ing…” as supplement to main clause

Here are some news article examples containing 'with my/their etc. being...' as supplement to a main clause: (1) Since the opposing counsel would be the U.S. Department of Justice, and with my ...
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1answer
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Analyzing 'genitive/accusative + V-ing phrase (gerund-participle phrase)' as different constructions

(1) I regretted [his leaving the firm]. (2) I regretted [him leaving the firm]. (3) I regretted [leaving the firm]. (4) He didn’t bother [giving me a copy]. Regarding the above ...
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with/without + pronoun (me vs. my) + gerund-participial phrase

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 461) has this section: (f) Subject of clausal complement of with/without Pronouns in this position normally appear in accusative case: [...
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objective pronoun in front of V-ing from an SAT perspective [duplicate]

Barron's Grammar Workbook (which claims to be written for those wishing to take "the SAT, ACT, and more") says to use a possessive pronoun before a gerund, and gives the following example: Her asking ...
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1answer
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“The fact of it being …” vs “the fact of its being …” [duplicate]

Which one of the following is correct/preferred? This process is devised in such a way that it works automatically while always revealing to the user the fact of it/its being intact. Both "the ...
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“He had me do this” vs “He had me doing this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this example sounds awkward, but it’s obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here" in sentences like this one: He said me being here was wonderful. That instance of me being ...
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4answers
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“…his parents' dream of *him* achieving a Cambridge degree.” What is the function of “him” here? [duplicate]

I have a problem analysing this sentence from the point of finite/nonfinite clauses, clause elements and their functions: He does not want to destroy his parents' dream of him achieving a Cambridge ...