Questions tagged [politeness]

This tag is for questions regarding the polite use of words or phrases.

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2answers
77 views

Is “they” plural or singular when it's someone's preferred pronoun? [duplicate]

Andy's preferred pronoun is "they". They goes to school in Denver, where they studies philosophy. or Andy's preferred pronoun is "they". They go to school in Denver, where they study philosophy. ...
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0answers
48 views

How to express in an idiomatic and polite way that I'm accepting a suggestion and then adding my own thought? [closed]

Assuming there is a suggestion to my writing, which mostly makes sense, but would make the most sense after I accepting that suggestion and adding my own interpretation/rephrase there. I wonder if ...
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0answers
9 views

Why as a subject does the pronoun “I” follow all other pronouns in a list? [duplicate]

Why is this sentence incorrect? I and you can go there. And why is this sentence correct? You and I can go there.
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4 views

Does the question sound rude? how to ask in English? [migrated]

How to form a question without sounding rude. If I see someone coughing, should I say: Is it rude to wear a mask? or Is it rude if I wear a mask? And is it rude in the American culture?
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1answer
48 views

'Would/do you mind' + whether (polite indirect questions)

Swan's 'Practical English Grammar' says: "Yes/no questions are reported with if or whether... whether and if can both introduce indirect questions." e.g: She asked me if/whether she could sit next ...
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0answers
38 views

“I'll have you wait” or “Please wait”, any difference?

I am wondering there is difference between following two sentences. A. I’ll have you wait here while I get a replacement. B. Please wait here while I get a replacement. Do they have the exact ...
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1answer
114 views

'I wanted to ask (you) if' vs 'Can I ask (you) if'

I was told recently that the first variant is rude (mainly, because of the word 'wanted'). So I should use the second one. Is it true? Or are both the options okay? Thank you.
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1answer
93 views

Synonym for “turd” [closed]

Is there a countable noun with the exact same meaning as "turd" - a single, formed piece of faecal matter? Giving the reason for this enquiry might illustrate why 'stool' doesn't really work IMO. (1) ...
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0answers
42 views

Polite reply to email stating you haven't given me what I needed?

I am helping another team in my company with a small project. My part in it was discussed about 2 weeks ago. I received an email today from a member of this team asking for an update on my part. ...
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1answer
168 views

apologise for or apologise about

Recently I found out some forums asking if "apologise about" is or not correct, but none of them have clear response. Can someone explain if there is any difference between those two terms? It is ...
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1answer
88 views

“Twisting someone's words” expression tone [closed]

Is the sentence "You are twisting his/her words" considered a respectful, polite, or neutral expression? To be clear, I am not asking about the meaning of the expression, nor I am asking a writing ...
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1answer
80 views

Is starting an email with “As I told you on Monday” considered condescending?

Take an email providing a followup on something starting like this: As I told you on Monday, .... Does this generally sound a bit condescending? To me it implies that you are repeating something ...
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1answer
136 views

Master to mister?

Why was Master weakened to Mister so as to address individual hominēs sapientēs and the English language lost the thou/you distinction while the Greek language kept both Kύριος intact and the Eσύ/...
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4answers
320 views

What would be another term for a person in their 50s and 60s other than “boomer” or “Gen-Xer”?

What would be another term for a person in their 50s and 60s other than "boomer" or "Gen-Xer"? People in their late 50s are technically baby-boomers, but "boomers" doesn't quite fit. People in their ...
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2answers
94 views

Is the expression “do not bother” polite?

I have a client who is a public figure in politics. I am working with her on writing some content for social media. I'd like to tell her that she doesn't need to send me 60 quotes, and that 30 is very ...
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1answer
76 views

take so long vs taking so long [closed]

I've worked in a market. Suddenly they stopped my work for verification purpose. They requested me to provide a student ID card. I've sent a scanned copy of my Student ID card for verification. One ...
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6answers
12k views

Is it rude to refer to janitors as 'floor people'?

I came into the office today and the first thing my manager asked me was is if I saw the 'floor people' while I was walking through the building. The reason he asked me this was because he had put in ...
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4answers
129 views

Connotation of “I was led to believe”

TL/DR: Does "I was led to believe" imply "my expectations were betrayed"? Does it have an aggressive connotation? Longer version: I am looking for an internship in a large company installed in ...
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1answer
84 views

Is the word “awful” offensive if used to describe someone's skills? [closed]

I recently read something like: Mr X was able to get the job even though his English is awful. In the above, suppose the background is Mr X landing a job for which good English skills were a ...
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1answer
2k views

Is it correct to write: “I would appreciate it if you could inform me when you could contact my manager” in a formal email? [closed]

I want to know if someone has eventually contacted my manager. I therefore want to send him a formal email to ask him very politely. Is it correct to write as follow ? "I would appreciate it if you ...
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1answer
349 views

Is using “if you would” instead of “if you will” in the sense of “if you wish/want/like” technically “correct”?

I may be wrong here, but I think of the verb "will" as in the set phrase "if you will" as an actual verb, with the rare sense "wish, desire, want", not as a mere future marker. Therefore, in this ...
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1answer
97 views

Pointing out customer's mistake politely in customer support setting [closed]

If someone sends in a support request with a mistake that they clearly made, what would be the polite way to answer? I initially used the term It seems that you have forgotten to fill in this and ...
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2answers
93 views

“Bash her up” – offensive or just an idiom?

My girlfriend and I were having an argument over something that her female friend had said about me, which I found rude and displeasing. My girlfriend responded to my complaint by saying "What do you ...
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1answer
144 views

is this answer rude? [closed]

recently some on in LinkedIn send a message to me: Thank you for connecting with me! I am recruiting for an Android Developer role (multiple levels) for a company whose product mostly likely impacts ...
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1answer
204 views

Is it rude to say 'You're actually cute for a person'? [closed]

You're actually cute for a person elitedaily says it is rude to say so. Well, I never heard someone say it. When someone says that you are pretty, or that you are cute, is it rude or is it a ...
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0answers
109 views

Is it okay to say “Excuse me, Ms.” to get attention from strangers who are women? [closed]

I was wondering that above sentence on title, “Excuse me, Ms.” is rude or not. I’ve watched a video on youtube about English titles, but “Excuse me lady.” is very rude to get attention from women, ...
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1answer
134 views

What should I say when my friend will have a new baby soon? [closed]

As titled. There are a ton of examples to congratulate newborns, however, is there anything similar before the birth of a new baby?
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1answer
139 views

How can I express that I have completed task given somebody in polite manner?

Somebody asked me to rebase my github repository with his repository and I did it as per his/her request. How can I express it in polite manner? Some sentences running in my mind are: I did rebase ...
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1answer
168 views

“to whom it may offend” vs. “to whom I may offend” [closed]

In my opening speech, is it right if I say I apologize to whom it may offend" or "I apologize to whom I may offend"
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1answer
1k views

“Could you please deal with it” sounds rude

My friend with a C2 in English says that "Could you please deal with it" sounds rude and it is better to use "Could you please take a look at it" or "Could you please fix it" because that's more ...
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1answer
73 views

Proper way to refer to someone that previously held an official title, but is no longer in said title

I’m trying to figure out the best way to refer to someone in a resume. I once received an award from former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld when he was still the Secretary of Defense. I use this ...
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2answers
226 views

Elon Musk’s “thanks for being awesome”

In a recent open letter to “everybody”, famous visionary entrepreneur Elon Musk uses the closing statement “Thanks for being awesome” (emphasis mine): From: Elon Musk To: Everybody Subj. ...
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2answers
86 views

Does one party involved in the action of “introducing someone to someone else” have a higher authority?

When you use the sentences such as "Kate introduced Joe to Ellen", "My former colleague introduced me to his boss", "My brother introduced them to me", is there one side of the introduction that has a ...
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1answer
113 views

How to properly refer to a person who had changed their name in the past tense?

A person changed her name from A to B. "My 6th grade English teacher was A" sounds right, but when I alter the sentence structure to "B was my 6th grade English teacher" it sounds right. These are ...
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2answers
3k views

Hi, Hello, Dear in answer to client’s Hi

We’re are a small atelier on Etsy and usually get questions from clients starting with Hi, Hi Roman (they sometimes see my name before composing a question) or Hey there. What would be the safest way ...
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1answer
728 views

Using “Would you like” vs “Do you want” between friends

Does it sound normal or overly polite to use "Would you like" between friends, for example "Hey Bob, would you like to play chess with me?"
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16answers
20k views

“Can I” vs “May I” in restaurant setting when ordering

A while back, while we were getting fast food, my friend commented on my usage of "can" versus "may" when asking to take my order. I said: Can I have a ....... and my friend argued you're ...
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1answer
880 views

Is it impolite to say hello to a doctor as “Hi, First Name”? [closed]

I'm based in Canada and I'm not a native English speaker. Is it impolite to call doctors and dentists by their first name instead of "Dr. Last Name" when answering a phone call?
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1answer
55 views

First names or surnames?

Writing out an interview with two Americans, in US English. It's an interview with 'brothers and sisters in the field' of medicine, semi-scientific, slightly formal but in a friendly kind of way. So ...
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0answers
90 views

“Osteoarthritis patients” vs “people with osteoarthritis”

In the scientific literature, I've seen two different preferences to refer to "people who have disease X". For example: Osteoarthritis patients People with osteoarthritis What are the actual ...
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2answers
159 views

'Do' as a one-word short answer

Example: - It's stuffy in here. Shall I open the window? + Do. Example: - Do you mind if I look at your paper? + No, please do. What is the grammar behind this structure? When can it be used?
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0answers
6k views

Is “keep my fingers crossed for you” polite or impolite?

Email is critical to business today. I'd like to write business email. Is "keep my fingers crossed for you" polite or impolite? ex:) I will keep my fingers crossed for you. Good luck to you.
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1answer
113 views

Email: addressing the users in CC [closed]

I am in a corporate setting, replying to an email from company's client. The email contains multiple participants in CC. I've never spoken to the client nor to anyone in CC. Is it normal to start my ...
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3answers
391 views

Should she have said that I stole the drink?

I'm Japanese and I live in US now. I can speak English a little. Today I went to a cafe and I mistook taking someone's drink. (I already purchased, and it was same matcha). A staff realized that and ...
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1answer
354 views

Was I being impolite using this phrase “Add our John Doe in the copy :)” at the end of a business conversation? [closed]

Some context: English is not my native language and I had a chat with my colleague from a remote location. She asked my team lead to add two users in some system and since the team lead was off the ...
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1answer
144 views

Global socially acceptable way of acknowledging that I'm being a “pedantic w****r”?

I'm Australian and would not hesitate to call myself a "pedantic wanker" in public (because, well... I often am!). There is a very small chance that someone (most likely elderly or particularly ...
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4answers
9k views

“Take care, sir!” - how formal/informal is “take care” in the meaning of “goodbye”?

According to oxforddictionaries (and also e.g. What does "Take care sweets" mean?), take care used at the end of a conversation has the meaning of goodbye: Said to someone on leaving them....
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1answer
7k views

“Yes sir” usage [closed]

I have heard "Yes, sir." used by a client or by the older participant in a conversation and it seems to me that this goes against the common usage. What is the connotation of "Yes, sir." in a ...
0
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1answer
595 views

Shoud I use a new line after Hi (someone's name) in e-mail? [closed]

In an e-mail, suppose we start with Hi John. Should I follow with Hi John, some content (i) or Hi John, some content (ii) Is there any etiquette behind choice (i) vs (ii)?
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1answer
2k views

How informal is “I am fond of”? [closed]

As said in the title how informal is "I am fond of", can I start a cold-email to a design studio like I am fond of your works or designs?

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