Questions tagged [poetry]

Poetry Is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its apparent meaning.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
0answers
92 views

Strange (archaic?) use of preposition

There was a shepherd that did live, And held his thoughts as high As were the mounts whereon his flocks Did hourly feed him by. ............ This beautiful little piece is quoted in "Walden" ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

what kind of stanza is this?

Had he and I but met By some old ancient inn, We should have set us down to wet Right many a nipperkin! Source: The man he killed by Thomas Hardy
22
votes
19answers
15k views

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____” [closed]

I am writing a poem for school. The verse with the word I need to change is this: 7 hours is too long In much too short a day You really don’t care if you get an answer wrong Because you don’...
1
vote
2answers
250 views

Meaning of "There as a man, if that he was a man, not that his manhood could be call'd in question" in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan: There was a man, if that he was a man, Not that his manhood could be call'd in question, For had he not been Hercules, his span Had been as short in youth as ...
33
votes
3answers
5k views

Meaning of "bull" in Byron's "this is no bull, although it sounds so"

From Byron's Don Juan: One with her flush'd cheek laid on her white arm, And raven ringlets gather'd in dark crowd Above her brow, lay dreaming soft and warm; And smiling through ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Meaning of "we're a slenderer pair than you would make the half of" in Byron's "Don Juan"

From Byron's Don Juan: Here Lolah interposed -- "Mamma, you know You don't sleep soundly, and I cannot bear That anybody should disturb you so; I'll take Juanna; we're a slenderer ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Meaning of "while he thereto was lashed" in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan: Nor yet had he arrived but for the oar, Which, providentially for him, was wash'd Just as his feeble arms could strike no more, And the hard wave o'erwhelm'd ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Meaning of "that the sail was becalmed between the seas" in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan: 'T was a rough night, and blew so stiffly yet, That the sail was becalm'd between the seas, Though on the wave's high top too much to set, They dared not ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Meaning of "breakers close beneath her lee" in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan, Canto II: Some lash'd them in their hammocks; some put on Their best clothes, as if going to a fair; Some cursed the day on which they saw the sun, And ...
6
votes
2answers
223 views

Parsing a passage in Byron's Don Juan: what is the subject of "offer" here?

From Byron's Don Juan: CXCIV "Man's love is of man's life a thing apart, 'T is woman's whole existence; man may range The court, camp, church, the vessel, and the mart; Sword, gown, gain, glory, ...
1
vote
1answer
346 views

Meaning of "if still free" in Byron's Don Juan

From Don Juan: And even if by chance—and who can tell? The devil's so very sly—she should discover That all within was not so very well, And, if still free, that such or such a ...
1
vote
0answers
116 views

Meaning of "they were become traditional"

From Byron's Don Juan: And if your quarrels should rip up old stories, And help them with a lie or two additional, I'm not to blame, as you well know—no more is Any one else—they ...
1
vote
0answers
128 views

Meaning of "as if so gentle that you could not see" in a poem by Keats

On a Picture of Leander, by Keats: Come hither, all sweet maidens soberly, Down-looking aye, and with a chasten'd light, Hid in the fringes of your eyelids white, And meekly let your fair ...
2
votes
1answer
245 views

Meaning of "who would not let men call their wives their own to kick like Britons"

From Aurora Leigh: I had my windows broken once or twice By liberal peasants, naturally incensed At such a vexer of Arcadian peace, Who would not let men call their wives their own To kick ...
-1
votes
1answer
78 views

An inconsistency in Julian Grenfell's 'Into Battle'

Grenfell's First World War poem Into Battle contains this verse : The blackbird sings to him: "Brother, brother, If this be the last song you shall sing, Sing well, for you may not sing ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Meaning of "haply of your fault"

From Aurora Leigh: Or worse, we'll say. For dogs, unjustly kicked, Yell, bite at need; but if your dramatist (Being wronged by some five hundred nobodies Because their grosser brains most ...
3
votes
1answer
368 views

Meaning of a sentence in "Aurora Leigh"

I cannot understand the meaning of one sentence in Aurora Leigh: "Now may God Deliver me from this strait! This gift of yours Was tendered . . when? accepted . . when?' I asked. 'A month . . ...
1
vote
2answers
535 views

What is the meaning of the sentence "Hopes dashed through" and what is the use of Through" as an adverb?

I'm reading E.A.Poe Complete tales and Poems and I found out this interesting phrase In which a have a question. ... was caracterized by a dramatic stories, Breakdowns and recoveries, personal ...
2
votes
3answers
13k views

What does spite mean in "spite of despondence" in the poem Endymion by John Keats?

The poem Endymion by John Keats reads: A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a ...
3
votes
2answers
354 views

Is there a name for this paragraph indentation style?

In longer form poems you sometimes see a verse where the first line is indented to the level of the end of the previous verse’s last line. For example, this Keats poem: or this poem from Wordsworth: ...
2
votes
1answer
636 views

Meaning of "care" in " my care is like a shadow in the sun"

In the poem “On Monsieur’s Departure” attributed to Queen Elizabeth I of England, we find this passage: My care is like my shadow in the sun Follows me flying, flies when I pursue it, Stands ...
0
votes
0answers
294 views

A figure of speech combining two phrases

I have read somewhere that it is typical of poems such as Nibelungenlied to use a figure of speech which in fact merges two phrases into one by the mean of a common word. An example could be the ...
0
votes
1answer
563 views

Passive voice sentence in "The New Colossus" excerpt

I'm in 10th grade English, and for my assignment I have to highlight three sentences in this excerpt in The New Colossus by Emma Lazarus. ... "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses ...
1
vote
0answers
221 views

Can we say "Some things end good, some things end bad" in informal American/Britain English?

I have a question about this sentence: Some things end good, some things end bad Could it be safely written in poetry or in the lyrics of a song? I know that there are the adverbs well and badly, ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Should it be "you and I" or "you and me" in the song "We are the world"

In the song "We are the world" by Michael Jackson and Lionel Ritchie, there are these lyrics: "We are the world, We are the children We are the ones who make a brighter day So, let's ...
4
votes
1answer
610 views

What is the etymology of "oil"? Is the cute description of oil and petrol in the poem Autogeddon fiction?

Extract from Autogeddon - by Heathcote Williams. OIL. From the Sanskrit root -il, light, illumination, And petr, Peter, the rock. Thus, petrol is―remarkably―light from the rock. The part ...
0
votes
0answers
704 views

"Cursed" as two syllables in poetry [duplicate]

While the normal pronunciation of "cursed" is in one syllable, I have seen it used as a two-syllable word, "curs-ed". The Cambridge dictionary lists this pronunciation as an alternative in UK only: ...
0
votes
1answer
145 views

Can "those" be a two-syllable word?

For the purpose of poetry, can one use "those" as a two-syllable word (tho-uhz)? Or is it always one syllable, as in normal usage? Minimal (contrived) example of the possible, or impossible, use: ...
0
votes
1answer
233 views

What meter and verse form does this poem have?

I found this poem a while ago, and I'm wondering what verse form and meter it utilises: The wrinkling sea shone dimly Beneath a waxen moon. The bitter gale blew bleakly Against a mermaid’s ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

What is the purpose of indentation in a poem? [closed]

For example, in this poem, entitled Remember, by Christina Rosetti: Remember me when I am gone away,       Gone far away into the silent land;    &...
3
votes
2answers
695 views

What does this Gil Scott-Heron line mean: "God's hole card has been thoroughly piqued."

The line is from "Comment #1." I know that a "hole card" is a card in poker (and apparently also blackjack) that is dealt face-down. But I'm unclear on what it means for that card ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

In poetry, what is the word for using a word that can be substituted for many others?

In Frost's poem Loneliness, the last line is 'Our loneliness, so long and vast.' I believe that the word 'loneliness' could be a 'stand-in' word for many others such as 'life', 'expectations' or '...
3
votes
1answer
128 views

"Be like night" vs "Be like the night"

I'm sorry if this question is somewhat basic. I have a sentence here that goes like this: Be like night, in covering others’ mistakes And like the earth, in being humble; In love and ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the name of this rhyme scheme: ABABCCDDC?

What is the name of this rhyme scheme: A B A B C C D D C A list of (other) rhyme schemes can be found here. An example can be found on this page. Sweet Destiny by Jan Turner (stanza 1) Oh ...
3
votes
1answer
23k views

What is the name of a verse consisting of 7 syllables?

What is the name of a verse consisting of 7 syllables? I thought it was called a heptameter, but that seems to be something different. Example: I like chocolate cake with pears.
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Rules of metrics rhythm and rhyme in poetry, do they exist in English?

I know there are a lot of rules and guidelines in english, for writing a good essay (especially around S.A.T. season!) No such thing in spanish, though! However, for writing poems Spanish does have a ...
1
vote
1answer
534 views

Noun + Infinitive vs. Gerund + Noun

Here is a quote from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner: And I had done a hellish thing, And it would work 'em woe: For all averred, I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow. Ah ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it considered normal to say "many millions"?

For a poem I'm writing for my English class, in order to fit in some consonance, I plan on saying Many millions of miles But I am wondering if this is correct grammar, as millions already implies ...
0
votes
1answer
121 views

Is there a standard poetic contraction for "holiest"?

Is there a standard poetic contraction for the word "holiest"? I wish to contract it to two syllables, such that it reads "HOLE-yist". Should this be spelled "hol'est"? Or even "hol'iest"? Would ...
5
votes
1answer
181 views

Why does the letter 'y' appear randomly in front of words in Renaissance poetry? [duplicate]

In a work by Thomas Watson (1555-1592), there is a line as follows: Her dainty forehead from the sun ykept. Why does y appear in front of kept? I have seen this odd use of y in other poems in the ...
36
votes
2answers
16k views

Why did Blake spell "tyger" with a "y"?

In the poem THE TYGER by William Blake: Tyger Tyger, burning bright, In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? Why is "Tiger" spelled Tyger, ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Confusion about some lines in "The Children's Song" by Rudyard Kipling [closed]

In Rudyard Kipling's poem "The Children's Song" from Puck of Pook's Hill, what do the lines in bold mean? Teach us to rule ourselves alway, Controlled and cleanly night and day; That we may ...
4
votes
1answer
274 views

Word for including by exclusion [duplicate]

I once knew a word that meant to mention something by announcing that you would not mention it. The word may be Greek; I encountered it in the study of poetry. An example, then, from poetry, Edmund ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

What does the word "wind" mean in this John Donne poem?

“Go and Catch a Falling Star”, by John Donne Go and catch a falling star,         Get with child a mandrake root, Tell me where all past years are,         Or who cleft the devil's foot, Teach me to ...
0
votes
1answer
597 views

Meaning of a poetic phrase (in Melville's "Misgivings") [closed]

Herman Melville wrote the poem "Misgivings," which is impressive and, seemingly at least, about the American Civil War. Its last line is, "The hemlock shakes in the rafter, the oak in the driving ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

The meaning of "span" that belongs to horses

In the poem "One and one" of Mary Mapes Dodge there is a line: Two little ponies must go to a span It seems, the "span" here is some term belonging to horses. Obviously, some place where they run ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Term for song or poem where the end of one line is also the start of the next [duplicate]

The Jonathan Coulton song "Sticking it to Myself" has an interesting style of lyricism in its second verse: Sticking it to my Self-control; that's not the only thing I lack A plan. Just my ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the poetic meter of 'O.K.'? [closed]

Is the acronym "O.K." generally pronounced as an iamb or a trochee? Or is it context-dependent?
6
votes
1answer
498 views

Why are diacritics used in words that apparently don't need them? Is it some sort of poetic license? [duplicate]

In his poem Spring and Fall, Gerard Manley Hopkins uses diacritics where one would normally not see them. Does anyone know why? Here is the poem: Márgarét, áre you gríeving Over Goldengrove ...
-2
votes
1answer
411 views

What does the translator mean in English in this translation of a verse by the Urdu poet Ghalib? [closed]

Here is the translation of a verse by Ghalib [1797–1869], originally written1 in the Urdu language: Neither Asad besought cruelty, nor was thy tyranny fond of the insanity; to whatever extent I ...

1 2
3
4 5
7