Questions tagged [poetry]

Poetry Is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its apparent meaning.

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How would one scan the poem in Boromir's dream?

Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring contains this short poem, heard by Boromir in a dream and related to the Council of Elrond: Seek for the Sword that was broken;   In Imladris it dwells; There ...
chepner's user avatar
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How is death "romanticized"? [closed]

Many times in question papers we can see that there's a question on "how death is romanticized in xxxx poem/ story?" My question is how do we determine that the writer has romanticized death ...
user479605's user avatar
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Excerpts from a poem: need help understanding poetic English

This is John Keats’s classic Petrarchan sonnet “To the Nile”, which was written two hundred years ago in a style more ancient still: Son of the old Moon-mountains African! Chief of the Pyramid and ...
Selfie groufie's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is the correct word for referring to the speaker of a song or poem? [duplicate]

Like "narrator", but for something that isn't a narrative. Do we have a word for that?
Adam's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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What does "brook no challenge" mean?

I am not sure how to understand this expression which showed up in a Walt Whitman poem (Passage to India : 142) - English is not my first language Brook normally means 'to not tolerate' but that doesn'...
michaPau's user avatar
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Is "what" or "whom" correct in this example?

I'm writing a poem and the last line will be either: A [sailor] is not what I wish to be or A [sailor] is not whom I wish to be. (Sailor is bracketed because the actual noun is different but ...
Beth Lynette's user avatar
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1 answer
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"Some may be from showing up" meaning in the Rose Tattoo by Dropkick Murphys

I am trying to get the meaning of the song. As far as I can tell, the man is describing his tattoos, or, rather, recalls circumstances where he's got them. I think I understand most of the verses, ...
Col. Shrapnel's user avatar
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1 answer
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Which literary device is "the only place to put the pieces were the bags under my eyes"?

I am writing a few paragraphs about Rupi Kaur's poetry. I've been trying to think about which literary device is used in this example. In milk and honey, written by Rupi Kaur, she states: "the ...
Arden's user avatar
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When quoting poetry, is it appropriate to place [sic] after a lowercase 'I'?

I am quoting one of Rupi Kaur's poems. Kaur purposely writes using all-lowercase letters for the pleasing aesthetic of her poetry. However, this may make it a bit difficult to quote. In one of her ...
Arden's user avatar
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Request for Grammatical Explanation of Shakespeare's Line [closed]

I am particularly looking for the grammatical explanation of the "hath ending" in the last line of the following stanza, why it's not "the world is ending"? Or if I say it means ...
Tayyab's user avatar
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Talking "saloon"

I recollect vaguely a line found in some piece of poetry by Dylan Thomas, and it suggests a question in many ways puzzling that I could hardly answer. I have not been able to find the poem and I ...
LPH's user avatar
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Can I contract "you is" to "you's"? [duplicate]

Not in the sense of "you are", but rather, I'm writing a poem for my girlfriend and I wrote this line: "Loving you's no hassle." I don't want to use anything incorrect, but I also ...
wncslao's user avatar
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15 votes
12 answers
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I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

This is for a poetic endeavor. The person allowing this is a people pleaser and lacking in self-esteem (obviously). They feel they are in love with the “user” and although aware that the “relationship”...
Kary's user avatar
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Meaning of "you are sharing my share of with"

There's a poem that used this phrase and the line approximately sounds like that: I think of [...] the heart you are sharing my share of with the American air. I fail to understand the point of the ...
Bianca I.'s user avatar
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Did the English place name "Frome" used to be pronounced as it is spelled?

The English town Frome is famously pronounced as "froom". The following is two stanzas from the dedication of G.K. Chesterton's poem Ballad of the White Horse, from 1911. Up through an ...
Se F's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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What does Tennyson mean by "Ye think ... the murmur of the world"?

I am finding the following lines from Tennyson's Idylls of the King rather perplexing (full text here): A thousand pips eat up your sparrow-hawk! Tits, wrens, and all wing'd nothings peck him dead! ...
Doubt's user avatar
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Poetic metre of 'Three Little Birds'

I'm trying to understand how poetic feet and meter apply in different contexts, particularly lyrics. When considering this, the majority of the texts which I read seem to assume that meter is fairly ...
Peter Lawford's user avatar
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Is there a term for quoted language in a poem?

In Wyatt's Whoso List to Hount, there is a (fictional) piece of writing quoted. Here are the three lines that display this: There is written, her fair neck round about:/ 'Noli me tangere for Caesar'...
DRE's user avatar
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How was the è in past-tense verbs pronounced?

How would Shakespeare have pronounced damnèd for example? How about the end of Nurse's Song by Blake: The little ones leapèd, and shoutèd, and laugh'd And all the hills echoèd How would he have ...
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If a written line of poetry ends ᴡɪᴛʜᴏᴜᴛ a punctuation mark and the next line starts with “and”, is this considered an enjambment?

In the poem “Planetarium” by Adrienne Rich, there are the following lines: of a woman trying to translate pulsations into images for the relief of the body and the reconstruction of the mind. The ...
muksi's user avatar
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"Sought for" at the end of a sentence

Does anyone know if "sought for" can be used at the end of a clause, phrase, or sentence, even if "for" might be redundant? I'm not speaking of "sought for [something]", ...
Frixos's user avatar
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Prepostition 'as to' in poetry

So I ran accross this line in a poem of Alexander Pope: Vice is a monster of so frightful mien As to be hated needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
660 views

In English, are trains female?

In the poem Night Mail by W. H. Auden, the eponymous train is always referred to as being female: This is the night mail crossing the Border, Bringing the cheque and the postal order, Letters for the ...
DrMcCleod's user avatar
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1 answer
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How to understand Trisyllables in poetry?

I can understand usually when a foot in poetry is iambic or trochaic, however I am a bit confused when a foot is comprised of 3 syllables. Is there poetry written with this? And how do you tell where ...
JohnR's user avatar
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What is the mouse shape of "The Mouse's Tale" in Alice? [closed]

"The Mouse's Tale" is a shaped poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in his 1865 novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. I read in Mouse Tale (Fall 91): Traditional tail-rhymes have a shorter ...
MaudPieTheRocktorate's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
109 views

Why 'd' in 'Aeneid'?

The Latin poem Aeneis is Aeneid in English. How did the last d come about? A few suspects by quick search: /ð/ → /d/ shift in English, but there must be a shift /s/ → /ð/. It seems romance languages ...
sundowner's user avatar
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1 answer
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Despite a break of traditional rules, my sonnet still be called a sonnet?

I am having to do a sonnet for a class poetry slam, and in reviewing what I have at the moment, realize this as one of my lines: .../so briefly, in the multivalent chagrin, the gray of conformity, ...
BigRigz's user avatar
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1 answer
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iambic pentameter, stress, and monosyllables

I am studying poetry structure and I am focusing on iambic pentameter at the moment. From what I have read, there are 10 syllables per line and 5 stressed and 5 unstressed syllables. It goes ...
user1261710's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

"Hook it home" meaning

I stumbled upon the idiom "hooking it home" in some of Bukowski's lines. Namely, the whores are there for young boys and old men; to the young boys they say, "don't be frightened, ...
dimitris's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
96 views

Help with some Bukowski syntax [closed]

I'm working to translate some Bukowski and got confused with the syntax of "Advice For Some Young Man In The Year 2064" (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/751678994049154743/) to the point that ...
dimitris's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
721 views

Is there any literary name attributed to 12 verse length stanza?

Not a 12 line poem, but a 12 verse stanza.
Santino Agosti's user avatar
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1 answer
71 views

Where would the question marks fall within this poem?

Can someone help me punctuate this line? It is poetry, which may not always follow the common rules of punctuation... I asked myself is there such a place in the deepest part of the soul where noone ...
gayle's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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A meaning without suitable words

I wanted to add a poem to my book but I can't manage to convey my meaning in the right words. The first sentence was about bells that indicate _____. That was where my sentence end. The meaning that I ...
Artemis Silver's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
121 views

What is the rhythm of the following poem?

When we grab you by the ankles, Where our mark is to be made, You'll soon be doing noble work, Although you won't be paid. When we drive away in secret, You'll be a volunteer, So don't scream when we ...
Liam Loroy's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
563 views

What is it called when a poetry stanza alternates between iambic tetrameter and triameter?

What is it called when a poetry stanza alternates between iambic tetrameter and triameter? If I shall wander into hell And die upon its coals So we have one line of iambic tetrameter and one line ...
FaerieFire's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
192 views

Meaning of these verses from a poem by Keats [closed]

What does these words mean : And in the midst of this wide quietness A rosy sanctuary will I dress With the wreath’d trellis of a working brain, I'm not a literature student, these verses were ...
Kashmiri's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
168 views

What's the meaning of "steal" in There Is A Pleasure In The Pathless Woods? [closed]

There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar: I love not man the less, but Nature ...
LIdbioe's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
242 views

What is the figure of speech used in these lines? [closed]

Jacob's Ladder Hearken! Trim that swagger a trifle, you wretched lump of earth! Stamp those feet neither, nor act so haughty Hearken! You are but a tiny figure on the grand scroll A statistic, a ...
user405662's user avatar
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What is a word for when you understand and comprehend something but cannot do it?

Emily Dickinson understands all the concepts of poetry but cannot write all her thoughts.
user421172's user avatar
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0 answers
23 views

What is the meaning of "right back over my hill" in a poetic context?

Before he was gone - right back over my hill Who now will find him? Why, nobody will Doom shall I bring to him, I that am queen Lost forever, nine by nineteen. What is the meaning of right back over ...
Sabbir Ahmed's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
237 views

What is the name of the poetic device where the author creates neologisms/malaprops to complete the rhyme?

I just learned about slant rhyming where you use a distorted not quite rhyme. Emily Dickinson is noted or these. (I personally don't like these, as they distract. Much like trying to make a pun on ...
Sherwood Botsford's user avatar
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0 answers
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Rhetorical device for sentence structure imitating meaning

I am trying to find the specific rhetorical device which means that the structure of the sentence I’m writing about imitates the meaning. In this particular case the writer using enjambement to convey ...
Alice's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
126 views

Does the antecedent of ‘you’ shift in Labouchère’s poem “The Brown Man’s Burden”?

I was reading Henry Labouchère’s poem “The Brown Man’s Burden” first published in 1899. I was a little confused because at one point the antecedent for ye/you appears to switch from the white men to ...
CuriousCat's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
78 views

What does "klioklio" mean? [closed]

I'm reading Malcolm Lowry's letters and his second letter to Conrad Aiken finishes like this: Klioklio, C. M. Lowry Does anyone know what "klioklio" mean? Thanks in advance!
ovide's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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What does "te-thrum" mean?

I'm reading Malcolm Lowry's letters and his first letter to Conrad Aiken finishes like this: te-thrum te-thrum te-thrum te-thrum, Malcolm Lowry Does anyone know what "te-thrum" mean in this ...
ovide's user avatar
  • 139
1 vote
1 answer
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Did the accent in "without" shift from the first syllable to the second in the past?

To be sure, the line from William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, written in 1591, reads: There is no world with-OUT Verona walls. However, a passage in John Milton's Paradise Lost, written in 1667, ...
Ricky's user avatar
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3 answers
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Is the Christmas carol “We Three Kings” intentionally ungrammatical for artistic reasons, or does it use archaic grammar?

I was listening to the “We Three Kings” Christmas carol, and I ended up taking note of the syntax. Given the use of the thou/thy/thee/thine pronouns for the second-person singular and the vocative ...
thepufferfish's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
64 views

"conquer by flood and by field"

While reading an English poem from Robert M. M'Cheyne (1813–1843), Jehovah Tsidkenu (= Jehovah our Righteousness) there is one stanza that reads Jehovah Tsidkenu! my treasure and boast, Jehovah ...
Tiago Martins Peres's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
66 views

Name of this lyrical device comparing oneself to something that's described by the same word, but in another sense of the word?

Warning: The examples contain some offensive words, but I believe that is not against the rules here? Lately I've been listening a lot to a certain hip-hop album, in which almost every track uses a ...
Fiksdal's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
297 views

What is a person called if they study poems but do not write them?

I am doing a research paper for Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson. I do not know the term to use if I'm trying to talk about someone who studied the poems they made before they died. Can anyone help me ...
Noel J.'s user avatar
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