Skip to main content

Questions tagged [poetry]

Poetry Is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its apparent meaning.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4 votes
2 answers
556 views

Parse Pope's "they humbly take upon content"

From Alexander Pope's Essay on Criticism II.305–310: Others for language all their care express, And value books, as women men, for dress: Their praise is still—"the style is excellent": ...
Quuxplusone's user avatar
  • 2,724
4 votes
2 answers
73 views

Why "when we first begun" in Amazing Grace?

In the hymn Amazing Grace, the final verse reads thus: When we've been there 10,000 years Bright shining as the sun We've no less days to sing God's praise Than when we first begun Given that we ...
Leonard Blavatsky's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

Using brackets / ellipsis in quotes; also, citing poems?

When using a bracketed form of ellipsis, would I also bracket the period at the end of a quote ended early? Ex. "What god drove them to fight with such a fury? / Apollo the son of Zeus and Leto. ...
user500550's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
88 views

Terminology: Does a judge have a career in "litigation"?

I'm working on a song parody, satirizing a notably litigious group of people, and have run up against a little issue of "accuracy of terminology" and "phrasing that reflects my ...
Mooning at the Beys's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
55 views

Is the rhyme scheme about the ending sound or two sounds? [closed]

I'm an English language arts teacher, and I teach poetry. Used to tell my students that the rhyme scheme is about the ending sound of each line; like AABB, ABAB, etc. And when you find multiple lines ...
Ibrahim Fathy's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is there a name for this kind of loose pseudo alliteration? for example, gold -> glitter, crown -> king

In Norse poetry, to the fastidious skald, a word like take is not considered to alliterate with train, but a word like track does alliterate with a word like troop, and tear does alliterate with tin. ...
Ludvig Boysen's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
132 views

What does 'haply' mean in Keats's 'Ode to a Nightingale'?

The following line occurs in Keats's poem 'Ode to a Nightingale': And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne It seems to me that 'haply' means either, as Merriam-Webster says, 'by chance', or, ...
EulerSpoiler's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
270 views

What does 'pards' mean in Keats's 'Ode to a Nightingale'?

John Keats's 'Ode to a Nightingale' contains the line "Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards,". Away! away! for I will fly to thee, Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, But on the ...
EulerSpoiler's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Where can I find information on the prosody of a poem?

Where can I find out what the meters, feet, and stresses are in a poem? I found a website where you can guess where they are, but the website doesn't provide answers.
BadUsername's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
122 views

Eighteenth-century pronounciation of "wax"

In "Against Idleness and Mischief"(1715) ("How doth the little busy bee"), Isaac Watts rhymes "wax" and "makes". Were these two words pronounced the same at the ...
Tevildo's user avatar
  • 1,293
5 votes
2 answers
156 views

Do "radiant" and "brilliant" rhyme for the purposes of poetry? Wiktionary says their transcriptions are /ˈɹeɪ.di.ənt/ and /ˈbɹɪljənt/

Is this a dialectal/idiolectal thing, where some merge /i/ and /j/, and others don't? I'm ESL and always thought they're merged until now.
capet99's user avatar
  • 59
2 votes
2 answers
273 views

What is the sentence structure for this verse in John Keats' "The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone!"?

He writes: When the dusk holiday—or holinight [—][some versions put another em dash here] Of fragrant-curtain’d love begins to weave The woof of darkness thick, for hid delight, Should I read a ...
InfiniteSnow's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
103 views

Who is being fed in "Did hourly feed him by" from Walden, or, Life in the Woods? [duplicate]

There was a shepherd that did live, ⁠And held his thoughts as high As were the mounts whereon his flocks ⁠Did hourly feed him by From Walden, or, Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau I'm confused ...
ronald christenkkson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Understanding the line from Gunga Din

So, in Kipling's Gunga Din, there's a piece in the second stanza: The uniform ’e wore Was nothin’ much before, An’ rather less than ’arf o’ that be’ind, For a piece o’ twisty rag An’ a goatskin water-...
Hokhodihokh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
55 views

What is the reason for the absence of articles in in "... with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door" in "The Raven"?

The seventh stanza of Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven reads as follows: Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore; ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 20.4k
2 votes
1 answer
73 views

What's with the definite article in "It was in the bleak December"?

In his classic poem which pretty much everyone knows by heart, Edgar Allan Poe writes as follows: Ah, distinctly I remember It was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember Wrought its ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 20.4k
3 votes
4 answers
213 views

How would one scan the poem in Boromir's dream? [closed]

Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring contains this short poem, heard by Boromir in a dream and related to the Council of Elrond: Seek for the Sword that was broken;   In Imladris it dwells; There ...
chepner's user avatar
  • 195
1 vote
0 answers
25 views

How is death "romanticized"? [closed]

Many times in question papers we can see that there's a question on "how death is romanticized in xxxx poem/ story?" My question is how do we determine that the writer has romanticized death ...
user479605's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
99 views

Excerpts from a poem: need help understanding poetic English

This is John Keats’s classic Petrarchan sonnet “To the Nile”, which was written two hundred years ago in a style more ancient still: Son of the old Moon-mountains African! Chief of the Pyramid and ...
Selfie groufie's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the correct word for referring to the speaker of a song or poem? [duplicate]

Like "narrator", but for something that isn't a narrative. Do we have a word for that?
Adam's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
1 answer
242 views

What does "brook no challenge" mean?

I am not sure how to understand this expression which showed up in a Walt Whitman poem (Passage to India : 142) - English is not my first language Brook normally means 'to not tolerate' but that doesn'...
michaPau's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes
0 answers
54 views

Is "what" or "whom" correct in this example?

I'm writing a poem and the last line will be either: A [sailor] is not what I wish to be or A [sailor] is not whom I wish to be. (Sailor is bracketed because the actual noun is different but ...
Beth Lynette's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
389 views

"Some may be from showing up" meaning in the Rose Tattoo by Dropkick Murphys

I am trying to get the meaning of the song. As far as I can tell, the man is describing his tattoos, or, rather, recalls circumstances where he's got them. I think I understand most of the verses, ...
Col. Shrapnel's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Which literary device is "the only place to put the pieces were the bags under my eyes"?

I am writing a few paragraphs about Rupi Kaur's poetry. I've been trying to think about which literary device is used in this example. In milk and honey, written by Rupi Kaur, she states: "the ...
Arden's user avatar
  • 153
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

When quoting poetry, is it appropriate to place [sic] after a lowercase 'I'?

I am quoting one of Rupi Kaur's poems. Kaur purposely writes using all-lowercase letters for the pleasing aesthetic of her poetry. However, this may make it a bit difficult to quote. In one of her ...
Arden's user avatar
  • 153
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

Request for Grammatical Explanation of Shakespeare's Line [closed]

I am particularly looking for the grammatical explanation of the "hath ending" in the last line of the following stanza, why it's not "the world is ending"? Or if I say it means ...
Tayyab's user avatar
  • 39
1 vote
2 answers
105 views

Talking "saloon"

I recollect vaguely a line found in some piece of poetry by Dylan Thomas, and it suggests a question in many ways puzzling that I could hardly answer. I have not been able to find the poem and I ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 22.7k
14 votes
3 answers
5k views

Can I contract "you is" to "you's"? [duplicate]

Not in the sense of "you are", but rather, I'm writing a poem for my girlfriend and I wrote this line: "Loving you's no hassle." I don't want to use anything incorrect, but I also ...
wncslao's user avatar
  • 141
15 votes
12 answers
4k views

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

This is for a poetic endeavor. The person allowing this is a people pleaser and lacking in self-esteem (obviously). They feel they are in love with the “user” and although aware that the “relationship”...
Kary's user avatar
  • 163
1 vote
2 answers
56 views

Meaning of "you are sharing my share of with"

There's a poem that used this phrase and the line approximately sounds like that: I think of [...] the heart you are sharing my share of with the American air. I fail to understand the point of the ...
Bianca I.'s user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
117 views

Did the English place name "Frome" used to be pronounced as it is spelled?

The English town Frome is famously pronounced as "froom". The following is two stanzas from the dedication of G.K. Chesterton's poem Ballad of the White Horse, from 1911. Up through an ...
Se F's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
142 views

What does Tennyson mean by "Ye think ... the murmur of the world"?

I am finding the following lines from Tennyson's Idylls of the King rather perplexing (full text here): A thousand pips eat up your sparrow-hawk! Tits, wrens, and all wing'd nothings peck him dead! ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 419
0 votes
0 answers
64 views

Poetic metre of 'Three Little Birds'

I'm trying to understand how poetic feet and meter apply in different contexts, particularly lyrics. When considering this, the majority of the texts which I read seem to assume that meter is fairly ...
Peter Lawford's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Is there a term for quoted language in a poem?

In Wyatt's Whoso List to Hount, there is a (fictional) piece of writing quoted. Here are the three lines that display this: There is written, her fair neck round about:/ 'Noli me tangere for Caesar'...
DRE's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
147 views

How was the è in past-tense verbs pronounced?

How would Shakespeare have pronounced damnèd for example? How about the end of Nurse's Song by Blake: The little ones leapèd, and shoutèd, and laugh'd And all the hills echoèd How would he have ...
minseong's user avatar
  • 3,526
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

If a written line of poetry ends ᴡɪᴛʜᴏᴜᴛ a punctuation mark and the next line starts with “and”, is this considered an enjambment?

In the poem “Planetarium” by Adrienne Rich, there are the following lines: of a woman trying to translate pulsations into images for the relief of the body and the reconstruction of the mind. The ...
muksi's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
202 views

"Sought for" at the end of a sentence

Does anyone know if "sought for" can be used at the end of a clause, phrase, or sentence, even if "for" might be redundant? I'm not speaking of "sought for [something]", ...
Frixos's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
2 answers
260 views

Prepostition 'as to' in poetry

So I ran accross this line in a poem of Alexander Pope: Vice is a monster of so frightful mien As to be hated needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

In English, are trains female?

In the poem Night Mail by W. H. Auden, the eponymous train is always referred to as being female: This is the night mail crossing the Border, Bringing the cheque and the postal order, Letters for the ...
DrMcCleod's user avatar
  • 379
0 votes
1 answer
208 views

How to understand Trisyllables in poetry?

I can understand usually when a foot in poetry is iambic or trochaic, however I am a bit confused when a foot is comprised of 3 syllables. Is there poetry written with this? And how do you tell where ...
JohnR's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
308 views

What is the mouse shape of "The Mouse's Tale" in Alice? [closed]

"The Mouse's Tale" is a shaped poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in his 1865 novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. I read in Mouse Tale (Fall 91): Traditional tail-rhymes have a shorter ...
MaudPieTheRocktorate's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
130 views

Why 'd' in 'Aeneid'?

The Latin poem Aeneis is Aeneid in English. How did the last d come about? A few suspects by quick search: /ð/ → /d/ shift in English, but there must be a shift /s/ → /ð/. It seems romance languages ...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 647
1 vote
0 answers
1k views

"...The merry children spilling out of their homes..." What is the figure of speech here? [duplicate]

What is the poetic device in the line 'the merry children spilling out of their homes'? This is taken from the poem "My Mother at Sixty-six" written by Kamala Das, an Indian poet (the poem ...
Adil Mohammed's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
134 views

Despite a break of traditional rules, my sonnet still be called a sonnet?

I am having to do a sonnet for a class poetry slam, and in reviewing what I have at the moment, realize this as one of my lines: .../so briefly, in the multivalent chagrin, the gray of conformity, ...
BigRigz's user avatar
  • 443
1 vote
1 answer
3k views

iambic pentameter, stress, and monosyllables

I am studying poetry structure and I am focusing on iambic pentameter at the moment. From what I have read, there are 10 syllables per line and 5 stressed and 5 unstressed syllables. It goes ...
user1261710's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
105 views

"Hook it home" meaning

I stumbled upon the idiom "hooking it home" in some of Bukowski's lines. Namely, the whores are there for young boys and old men; to the young boys they say, "don't be frightened, ...
dimitris's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
107 views

Help with some Bukowski syntax [closed]

I'm working to translate some Bukowski and got confused with the syntax of "Advice For Some Young Man In The Year 2064" (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/751678994049154743/) to the point that ...
dimitris's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there any literary name attributed to 12 verse length stanza?

Not a 12 line poem, but a 12 verse stanza.
Santino Agosti's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

Where would the question marks fall within this poem?

Can someone help me punctuate this line? It is poetry, which may not always follow the common rules of punctuation... I asked myself is there such a place in the deepest part of the soul where noone ...
gayle's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
87 views

A meaning without suitable words

I wanted to add a poem to my book but I can't manage to convey my meaning in the right words. The first sentence was about bells that indicate _____. That was where my sentence end. The meaning that I ...
Artemis Silver's user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
8