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Questions tagged [poetry]

Poetry Is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its apparent meaning.

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Looking for a poem I have mostly forgotten [migrated]

I apologize in advance if this type of question does not follow the community guidelines, but I'm not sure where else to ask it (even my creative writing professor couldn't help). There was a poem on ...
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In a poetic structure using an AABBA scheme, should the final line's meter match the first two's?

I'm writing a poem for a class, my upper-level college written comp class, and we weren't told what structure to use but that we needed to use an established poetic structure employing verse as ...
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Zeal vs. Zest. Am I Using them Correctly Here?

Hello beautiful people, I'm writing a poem and I want to make sure I'm using "zeal" and "zest" correctly. To give context, it's about a storyteller (being I) retelling a story of a man who is giving ...
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“extinct” or “turn extinct”? [closed]

I was reading a poetry. One of its line is: "these voices need a pen before they turn extinct" Now I wonder if it should be "turn extinct" or just "extinct"?
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“Feeding off your fingers.” What does this mean? [closed]

"Feeding off your fingers." What does this mean? I'm Russian and I don't know literary English, but I'm translating the famous song Come Undone by Duran Duran. Who do you need, who do you love ...
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British / American poetry appreciation

Do native poetry enthusiast pay attention to British vs. American pronunciation when enjoying poetry? As I understand, there could be differences in rhythm and rhyme depending on the given accent, ...
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What is western persimmon?

I saw western persimmon in Leaves of Grass by the 19th-century American writer Walt Whitman. If you google it, you realize that American persimmon is also called common persimmon and eastern persimmon....
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Meter and rhythm in Poetry [closed]

Why is poetry called a 'literature in metrical form' or 'a composition forming rhythmic lines'?
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Using the metonymy “feather” to refer to an angel?

I was wondering if you can use the metonymy feather to refer to an angel(s)? Would feathers refer to several angels? Does this apply to poetry only or can I use it in other media?
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Using 'Ibid' within footnoting A Level

I am currently completing my final piece of A Level coursework for English Literature. I have cited a quote, and then the second quote is from a different place. Wrote out all the relevant details ...
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What is the equivalent of “euphony” when applied to writing?

In the details below, I use something to stand in for the word I am looking for. Speech may have euphony; writing may have something. For example, when writing about the relative sizes of items, I ...
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Can we use “whisky” to describe a squirrel going up a tree?

I am confused that the term "whisky" is used in the poem The Squirrel to describe a squirrel going up a tree (though 'whisky' denotes a drink). According to the Cambridge Dictionary, "whisky" denotes: ...
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What type of poem is this

I'm no English major. And I'm no poet either. But I love to read and I really like poetry. Anyways I found this Poem, and I hadn't seen anything like it before. Sky. Clouds sailing the soft blue ...
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pronouncing -ó in poetry [duplicate]

Do you guys know how '-ó' is pronounced? Context: The Windhover, Hopkins.       No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear,       Fall, gall ...
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Robert Frost's epitaph [closed]

What does Robert Frost's epitaph- "I had a lover's quarrel with the world " mean ? It is written just above his wife's epitaph -"Together wing to wing and oar to oar ". What do these symbolise?
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How should I understand these lines from As You Like It?

I am currently on my second reading of As You Like It. I am having a really hard time comprehending lines 22-25 in Act 1, scene 2. Here are those lines as they appear in the version I am reading (The ...
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What's the meaning of the phrase “be just beyond”?

This is a poem by Emily Dickinson: To wait an Hour—is long— If Love be just beyond— To wait Eternity—is short— If Love reward the end— What's the meaning of the phrase be just beyond here?
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Historical grammatically of “Do not go gentle into that good night”? [duplicate]

I am not by any means a poetry expert, but I know a bit about grammar and writing. Ergo, I can say that in Dylan Thomas’s most famous poem, Do not go gentle into that good night, the refrain that the ...
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What Does “that for” mean?

I'm trying to grasp the specific meaning of this poem. I get the sentiment, but have a hard time grasping that for destruction ice in this context. The author knows enough of hate to make a statement ...
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Meaning of the phrase “deceive the truth”

So I'm reading this poem, Milton's "How Soon Hath Time" and doing a line-by-line analysis. But I'm stuck in this line where the poet says "Perhaps my semblance might deceive the truth". Can anybody ...
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In Charles Bukowski's “Some people” what is the meaning of phrase “It's Cherub, they say”?

I'm puzzled at a phrase in Charles Bukowski's poem "Some people". The second paragraph reads: it’s Cherub, they’ll say, and they pour wine down my throat rub my chest sprinkle me with oils. ...
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1answer
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Is there a name for words rhyming from two different stanzas?

Im analyzing this poem, and I noticed that none of the words rhyme with each other in a stanza, but words rhyme with another word from tge next stanza. I understand rhyme scheme is supposed to be ...
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Could someone kindly scan the word “idiot” for me, please?

Three syllables or two? I mean, YES, it is three: officially. So the dictionary says. Still, how would you scan it in an iambic line? Or would it make a good trochee?
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What's an example of a 'cheville' word in english?

The dictionary.com word of the day is 'Cheville' and it explains it as such: A word or expression whose only function is to fill a metrical gap in a verse or to balance a sentence. Can anyone give ...
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'The Secret People' a poem by G.K. Chesteron: Is “Blood runs red” a proverb or is it literary language?

The line I am referring to is as follows: The fine French kings came over in a flutter of flags and dames. We liked their smiles and battles, but we never could say their names. The blood ran ...
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Meaning of “laughing string” in a Yeats poem

Does anyone know the meaning of ‘laughing string’ in these lines by Yeats? Bred to a harder thing Than Triumph, turn away And like a laughing string Whereon mad fingers play Amid a place ...
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Meaning of “wont” in a poem [closed]

I was translating this poem by Lord Byron: If, in the month of dark December, Leander, who was nightly wont (What maid will not the tale remember?) To cross thy stream, broad ...
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What sounds better My lovely Kellisa or the lovely kellisa [closed]

Am wrting a poem for a beautiful girl in my advanced English class and the last thing I want is for her to think I don't care about her (its freshman advanced English)
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Are “wuzzy” and “was he” homophones?

Can you have multiple-word homophones? If not, what would such pairs of same-sounding multiple words be called? There is the funny/children's rhyming poem Fuzzy Wuzzy: Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear. ...
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What is a word to describe the tone of an author who reveals a lot of information in a few sentences?

Is there a word to describe the tone of an author who tells readers of the past life and attributes of a character cryptically in a short passage? Is this considered tone, or is there another term for ...
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“hug” vs “embrace” vs “cuddle” (nouns) [closed]

According to Cambridge Dictionary these three words are synonyms (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/cuddle). How would you order these three words in terms of which is more loving? ...
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“untouched” vs “intact” vs “unblemished” [closed]

According to the Google dictionary these three words are synonyms. How would you order them in terms of which is more literary? Which one can be used more appropriately in a poetical context such in ...
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“I felt you when …” or “I felt it when …” [closed]

Please have a look at the following poetic line: "...I felt you when you washed up on an unknown coast..." Can I say "I felt you..." (to stress exactly my emotional proximity to the other person) or ...
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“washes sth/sb up” or “been washed up” or “washed up ”

Please have a look at the following poetic line: "...I felt it when the ocean/sea washed you up on an unknown coast..." Is this right or it is right to say: "...I felt it when you were washed up on ...
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Noun regarding flowers which are blooming [closed]

Please have a look at the following poetic lines: " Two white roses are your cheeks... the teardrops of sadness which flowed down them brought them into bloom instead of withering them" Is it ...
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Is this a grammatically correct line in a poem: “Will he roll the dice, and follow it to Vegas?”?

I want to use the following line in a poem: "Will he roll the dice, and follow it to Vegas?" A couple of things to note; firstly, obviously I'm using "roll the dice" in both a figurative/idiomatic ...
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In the poem “If—”, why does Kipling say “If you can… don't deal in lies”?

Just another question about the immortal poem :) The first verse reads as follows: If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies, Or, being hated, don’t ...
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55 views

Word order in the Hail Mary prayer

Part of the Hail Mary reads Blessed art thou among women, And blessed is the fruit of thy womb, etc. I have some intuitive sense that putting the adjective first accomplishes something subtle ...
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Strange (archaic?) use of preposition

There was a shepherd that did live, And held his thoughts as high As were the mounts whereon his flocks Did hourly feed him by. ............ This beautiful little piece is quoted in "Walden" ...
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what kind of stanza is this?

Had he and I but met By some old ancient inn, We should have set us down to wet Right many a nipperkin! Source: The man he killed by Thomas Hardy
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Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____” [closed]

I am writing a poem for school. The verse with the word I need to change is this: 7 hours is too long In much too short a day You really don’t care if you get an answer wrong Because you don’...
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2answers
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Meaning of “There as a man, if that he was a man, not that his manhood could be call'd in question” in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan: There was a man, if that he was a man, Not that his manhood could be call'd in question, For had he not been Hercules, his span Had been as short in youth as ...
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Meaning of “bull” in Byron's “this is no bull, although it sounds so”

From Byron's Don Juan: One with her flush'd cheek laid on her white arm, And raven ringlets gather'd in dark crowd Above her brow, lay dreaming soft and warm; And smiling through ...
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Meaning of “we're a slenderer pair than you would make the half of” in Byron's “Don Juan”

From Byron's Don Juan: Here Lolah interposed -- "Mamma, you know You don't sleep soundly, and I cannot bear That anybody should disturb you so; I'll take Juanna; we're a slenderer ...
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Meaning of “while he thereto was lashed” in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan: Nor yet had he arrived but for the oar, Which, providentially for him, was wash'd Just as his feeble arms could strike no more, And the hard wave o'erwhelm'd ...
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Meaning of “that the sail was becalmed between the seas” in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan: 'T was a rough night, and blew so stiffly yet, That the sail was becalm'd between the seas, Though on the wave's high top too much to set, They dared not ...
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Meaning of “breakers close beneath her lee” in Byron's Don Juan

From Byron's Don Juan, Canto II: Some lash'd them in their hammocks; some put on Their best clothes, as if going to a fair; Some cursed the day on which they saw the sun, And ...
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Parsing a passage in Byron's Don Juan: what is the subject of “offer” here?

From Byron's Don Juan: CXCIV "Man's love is of man's life a thing apart, 'T is woman's whole existence; man may range The court, camp, church, the vessel, and the mart; Sword, gown, ...
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Meaning of “if still free” in Byron's Don Juan

From Don Juan: And even if by chance—and who can tell? The devil's so very sly—she should discover That all within was not so very well, And, if still free, that such or such a ...
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Meaning of “they were become traditional”

From Byron's Don Juan: And if your quarrels should rip up old stories, And help them with a lie or two additional, I'm not to blame, as you well know—no more is Any one else—they ...