Questions tagged [phrases]

This tag is for questions about phrases in the linguistic sense. In linguistics a “phrase” is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function. Use [phrase-requests] if you are searching for a phrase.

345 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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4
votes
1answer
245k views

Is 'I am glad to hear that' very formal or informal phrase?

I said this to one professor when she expressed about her current research work. Later, I realized that that phrase could be very informal.
3
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0answers
47 views

Origin of “spring cleaning”

Some people have traced the origin of spring cleaning to the Iranian New Year, which is on the first day of spring. However, it seems like I can find earlier origins of this. What is the true origin ...
3
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0answers
476 views

Long (Pole/Poll/Pull)?

When you're indicating that something is the critical path that causes the whole project to take a long time, which one is it? Long Pole Long Poll Long Pull I actually find various sources when I ...
3
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0answers
112 views

Term for/etymology of the opposite of a nosism (using 'we' to mean 'you')

A nosism is the term for using 'we' to refer to oneself. I am looking for a term for/etymology of using 'we' to mean 'you'. EDIT: Another way of putting it is that I'm looking for the proper term ...
3
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4answers
64k views

What is another phrase for one stop shop?

I am writing a small description and need a phrase to highlight a range of services. Is there another phrase for "one stop shop" which is both catchy and apt?
3
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4answers
112 views

Which noun was referred to after comma?

I am reading a paragraph in English. English is obviously not my first language. I like to confirm my understanding of a sentence. This is the sentence. Copernicus had offered his replacement for ...
3
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1answer
226 views

Prepositional verb structure - “[rely] [on John]” or “[rely on] [John]”

It is difficult to determine the correct consituent structure of prepositional verbs, such as rely on someone. Either on someone forms a constituent to the exclusion of rely, as in (1), or rely on ...
3
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1answer
50k views

Usage of “give it a read”

Is the usage of the phrase "give it a read" correct? For instance, "Hey, I have attached my essay. Do give it a read and let me know what you think".
2
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0answers
39 views

Meaning of “is the same size and”

The following sentence comes from https://android.googlesource.com/trusty/app/storage/ The key value is a hash of the file name and is the same size and the block number size for the file system. ...
2
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0answers
32 views

Why use “Team” while voting?

While I'm surfing the online forum and social media about Godzilla VS Kong movie, I found lots of people said Team Godzilla & Team Kong to mean Support Godzilla & Support Kong. I want to know ...
2
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0answers
71 views

What's the Origin of the phrase “build bridges?”

For the past several days, I am coming across with "build bridges" phrase. I am keen to know about the origin of this phrase. I've done a lot of research on the internet but couldn't find it....
2
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0answers
67 views

When a noun phrase can act as the post-modifier?

According to Oxford Learner's Grammar by John Eastwood [ISBN:0-19-437-597-8], page 187; it is possible for a noun phrase to act as a postmodifier of the head noun. Example: The weather that day was ...
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0answers
351 views

Are both versions correct?

source: AT THE BACK OF THE NORTH WIND | GEORGE MACDONALD But for a four-wheeler as takes families and their luggages, he's the very horse. I was searching for the usage of luggages and found ...
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0answers
53 views

Is there a name for this grammatical structure where a verb is followed by a direction?

In English there are lots of phrases where a verb is followed by a direction and it takes on a whole new meaning. Examples: get up, get off, get down, take in, take out, take off, etc. This is ...
2
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2answers
255 views

Phrase, idiom, expression suited for putting one's own requirement saying that it is instruction coming from someone else

Context My boss one day called me in his office and said that now i have to include tasks 3,5,6 to complete the entire assignment. Traditionally, the usual sequence of task was from 1 through 10, but ...
2
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0answers
455 views

Does this adverb prepositional phrase modify the adverb, or vice versa?

The McGraw Hill Handbook of English Grammar and Usage (pg. 42) gives "We got there late in the evening" as an example of an adverb prepositional phrase ('in the evening') modifying an adverb ('late'). ...
2
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0answers
5k views

Came “into” fruition?

My friend wrote some copy, explaining that her "company came into fruition because she realized the opportunity..." I've never used "came into fruition" -- only "came to fruition". Is "came into ...
2
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0answers
154 views

Leave someone out. Discard somebody out. What is wrong with this sentence can someone help

In a demo session a demo students said the sentence. Sometimes you just have to discard somebody out. I didn't know how to fix it but I know he meant sometimes you have to leave somebody out. But how ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Grant somebody access to something or Grant access to something for somebody

Often I have to request access to specified resource for specified person. Is there any error in any of these forms and what is better to use? Grant somebody access to something Grant access to ...
2
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1answer
12k views

What's the correct phrase to use? In our app or on our app

This new service will be available in our app. This new service will be available on our app. What's correct? Second one feels wrong but interested to know what's right here.
2
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1answer
543 views

In the phrase “Good afternoon” what type of word is “afternoon”?

In the phrase "Good afternoon" what type of word is 'afternoon'? I've argued that it was a temporal pronoun, but a colleague googled the term "temporal pronoun" and came up with almost nothing, so I'...
2
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1answer
967 views

What is the english equivalant of Tamil saying 'pul thadukki bayilvan'?

In Tamil, there is a saying புல் தடுக்கி பயில்வான் ( pul thadukki bayilvan ) that translates to something like below: A person who thinks himself as a wrestler but falling down even his legs ...
2
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1answer
319 views

Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz

German chancellor Angela Merkel said at the Auschwitz commemoration: "Es ist eine Schande, dass Menschen in Deutschland angepöbelt, bedroht oder angegriffen werden, wenn sie sich irgendwie als Juden ...
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0answers
9 views

What is the meaning of (half a notion for something)?

What is the meaning of (half a notion for ..) in this context? What is left is attachment to yourself: a recognition of worth and the wish that it be preserved. Thus, half a notion for approaching ...
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0answers
42 views

Being confused with how the author describe the time frame

Dasgupta,2019,p.2597 said that the treated group comprises all firms that are headquartered in countries that have passed a leniency law by year t. The control group comprises firms in countries that ...
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0answers
37 views

“Either x or either y-” why does this occur?

Recently, I've noticed several instances of people repeating "either" in sentences, ex. "you're either the predator or you're either the prey." Is this a documented phenomenon, or ...
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0answers
38 views

What does ‘put a heavy thumb on" mean?

More recently, I have come across a sentence in Los Angles Times, which says "A White House office dedicated to the issue, similar to the White House office focusing on climate change, would put ...
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0answers
42 views

Infinitive Phrase or Verb Constituent

I refer to Doing Grammar by Max Morenberg as my default grammar reference. Morenberg makes a distinction between infinitive phrases, which function as Noun Subjects & Objects (SC, NDO, etc), and ...
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0answers
33 views

Add “you say” when asking a rhetorical question

Is it possible to add "you say" at the end of a rhetorical question? Let me give you an example: Someone says that their new job involves dancing - and then you respond by asking "...
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0answers
20 views

Are the maximal noun phrases found by this code incorrect?

I was reading the accepted answer to this question on natural language processing In there an english sentence is given: "Natural language processing (NLP) is a field of computer science, ...
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0answers
27 views

Omission of the noun in the second sentence of two sentences joined by a conjunction like “and”

First, I want to make clear that I'm not a native English speaker. So this question may seem too easy for native English speakers, but it is quite difficult to definitively answer for me. I have seen, ...
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1answer
32 views

Adjective classification in this sentence

In the phrase: "in a good many ways." are good and many adjectives? And if so, are they each descriptor or classifier? Or is the phrase 'good many' idiomatic? And if so, can 'good' and 'many'...
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0answers
44 views

Metaphor similar to “one apple spoils the whole bunch”?

I am trying to describe sectarianism that starts from the oldest generation and seeps down to their children and grandchildren and I am getting major writer's block when trying to find a metaphorical ...
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0answers
61 views

I wish to know meaning of phrase / expression wacky duck

I am writing a story at the moment about one villain from a horror movie and I often need rhymes. English is not my mother tongue. I read on Urban Dictionary that "wacky duck" means a hit to ...
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0answers
111 views

English phrase for Marathi “Aaiji chya Jivavar Baiji Udar” -“At expense of Mother-in-law's efforts, Showoff of Daughter-in-law's Generosity”

In India's Maharastra state in Marathi language ,there is a saying, "Aaiji chya Jivavar Baiji Udar" which means "At expense of Mother-in-law's efforts, Showoff of Daughter-in-law's ...
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0answers
19 views

Interpretation of phrase with imperative

I want to clear up the usage of imperative in the following sentence: "Come here to earn a coffee." Is this sentence equivalent to "if you come here then you will get a coffee"?
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2answers
57 views

Conjunctions, commas, and multiple sentences

I've browsed a lot on the Internet and couldn't find the answer on how to use commas on the next examples. Probably, it's because I don't know how these constructions are called? I'd appreciate some ...
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0answers
39 views

What is a single word/phrase that can be used in place of 'mistaken assumption' or 'incorrect belief'?

What is a suitable word that can be used in the below story scenario? I've considered the following words; Delusion, Conjecture, Fallacy, Belief, Erroneous assumption. Is there a better word anyone ...
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0answers
90 views

Face (in) a direction

Which one and why? To face a direction To face in a direction Context: Use this method to ensure your character always faces in the direction they are moving in.
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3answers
100 views

Can you please explain the use of “in what” in this sentence below?

I couldn’t figure out the grammatical role of “in what” in the sentence below. What does “in” refer to in this case? Can someone explain it please ? Burroughs killed Vollmer in what he first ...
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0answers
502 views

Is it correct to say “mission completed”?

Is it correct to say "mission is completed" or I should say "mission completed"?
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0answers
66 views

What does “as of” mean in this sentence?

The ocean threw its water over the island with the roar as of many voices.
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1answer
85 views

Phenomenon, when a phrase (lit. trans. into English from other regional language) has obvious mistake(s) and still uncorrectable due to popularity

Let me layout an example to make the situation, described in question more clear: There is a popular road in a city of Gujarat, India whose name when literally translated into English means "Horse ...
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0answers
19 views

did + present-continuous form

A conversation between me and my friend: Friend: I was sleeping when you called. And I do that everyday till 13:00. Me: ok ~3 days later he replies to me at 10:00 already~ Now my question: Is it ...
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0answers
28 views

What does „stocks of things, recent stuff” mean?

My friend has a problem with the phrase in the title. We’re both non-natives of English and despite my advanced level I’ve never seen such a phrase. It was said by a bilingual child while telling ...
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0answers
137 views

Is the phrase 'lock a target on sth' correct?

Let's assume a sniper wants to say 'I am aiming at the objective and I have my crosshairs right on it'. I've always thought they would use an expression 'I locked on/onto the target'. However, ...
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0answers
61 views

Who this part refers to?

I’d like to ask about the sentence I’m not sure about in The Engineer’s Thumbs by Conan Doyle. .. that of Mr. Hatherley’s thumb, and that of Colonel Warburton’s madness. Of these the latter may ...
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2answers
579 views

“The 1800s” versus “the 19th century”?

As a non-native English speaker, who never says "Xth century" in my language, phrases such as: In the late 19th century, they invented a lot of cool stuff! ... always forces me to stop and think ...
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0answers
200 views

Word or phrase to describe anything that seems trivial but can be indicative of something important

When I say “anything” I could be referring to a comment, an interaction, a symbol, or an action. I’m not sure how to explain this without using examples. In hospitals, doctors often identify patients ...
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0answers
22 views

“Aim for hard problems” vs “Aim for solving hard problems”

In my resume, I want to communicate I enjoy solving hard problems. I used a phrase backend programmer with an aim for hard problems In my natural language leaving out the solving word does not ...

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