Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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1answer
514 views

Phrasal verb of go that means break? [closed]

What is the phrasal verb of the word go that means break? I've thought of go beyond but it seems to be unsuitable. So what is the correct phrasal verb?
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1answer
94 views

What is the correct phrasal verb for “integration by parts”?

When speaking in conversation, or writing up a paper, and applying the said technique on a function, is it correct to say "partially integrate"? e.g. "We partially integrate X..." versus "We ...
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Meaning of the phrasal verb “wheeled on”

The phrasal verb mentioned in the title, wheeled on, can't be found in any* dictionary. Usages: In fact it was the experts, or at least those wheeled on by the remainers who didn't get it. -- Roger ...
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3answers
989 views

Longest Phrasal Verb?

In terms of word count, what is the longest phrasal verb in the language? (The longest that I can think of is only three words long, but there must be longer ones, right?) Take "bend over backward" ...
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1answer
4k views

Use of ''open something up for discussion''

I wrote a sentence and I think it's grammatically correct but I'm not sure because it's long and I don't know if we can use this phrasal verb like this. It opens the matter that ...(a full sentence).....
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1answer
193 views

Is “get in game” a correct way of asking someone to get online in a video game?

In particular, is it OK to use no article (to avoid confusion with the idiom "get in the game")? Are there any better ways to tell someone to log into the game without saying "log in"? Example: "get ...
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3answers
902 views

Constituency tests needed to differentiate between phrasal verbs and verb + prepositional phrase constructions

In this post, I am asking for constituency tests to assist me in writing exercises about phrasal verbs for non-native speakers of English. I respectfully ask that only native speakers answer the ...
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1answer
199 views

“To find something” vs. “to find oneself faced with something”?

What exactly is the difference in the meanings of 1 and 2? After considering all alternatives, we find a variety of different accounts for X. After considering all alternatives, we find ...
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2answers
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What can I use for plural-you? Should I use “you all”?

It used to be the case that for the second person singular we would use "thou" and for second person plural we would use "you". These days, the "thou"s have been replaced with "you" except perhaps in ...
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1answer
1k views

Can I use 'shield off' [closed]

Can I use 'shield off'? Here is an example: The volunteers encourage the visitors to speak with John, rather than shielding him off.
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14answers
7k views

A verb for when we actively extract information from others?

Sometimes, others just inform us about things without us asking them, other times they do not do that even if we ask them. I want a verb for when others do not give us information — whether because ...
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1answer
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Check vs. check up on

What is the difference between "check" and "check up on"? Let us say my friend Kate is in her room a little bit sick. I am going to her bedroom to see if she is OK, and tell other friends of mine: I ...
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2answers
994 views

“Clouded” vs “clouded over.”

What's the different between the two? Example: My mind clouded with murky thoughts. My mind clouded over with murky thoughts. (By the way, should it use with or by?)
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2answers
4k views

Appearances and usage of “believe on” instead of “believe in.”

I am curious as to how much "believe on" has been preferred in over "believe in," and how much it has appeared in writing and manuscripts. I know the King James Bible uses it in only two books of its ...
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1answer
611 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb collect off

In this article, there is a sentence as follows A joy to watch, Wenger had come in as the untrusted foreigner, paved the way for others to join, and rewrote the tactical rulebook. Out went the ...
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1answer
245 views

Zero in on: Have I used it correctly in this context? [closed]

They are all of them competent architects. But I have ZEROED IN ON (= chosen) John to design my house. Have I used “zero in on” correctly here?
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3answers
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Which one is correct “died of” or “died from”? [closed]

I read that died of disease is correct in context of disease and died from is correct in context of accident. but I read in news that died from is also used in context of disease for instance: ...
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2answers
171 views

About the syntactical function and meaning of “up” in “man up” or “lawyer up”

As far as I have been able to understand, up in this kind of phrasal verbs is an adverb which, according to this dictionary, means: 5 Into the desired or a proper condition. What is interesting ...
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2answers
74k views

“apply to” vs. “apply for” an opportunity

I am trying to complete the following sentence: " . . . where certification qualifies students to apply [prep.] a wider range of employment and higher learning opportunities." I have noted the ...
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2answers
348 views

Batter up! A verb or a noun?

Does anyone know whether "batter" as in "batter up!" on a baseball field is a noun or a verb derived from a noun? To test for its verbhood, you'd have to apply some verb-related tests. Can it have a ...
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5answers
1k views

A verb for a more precise way of showing a puzzle?

I have talked about a puzzle in a more general way. Now I want to identify a more precise and specific formulation of that puzzle. What verb should I use? Example: Life in this world seem to be a ...
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1answer
678 views

Can I say “dispose” (without “of”) to mean dumping things?

I had always thought that one must say "dispose of" when referring to getting rid of something, until I came across this article by the government of Australia: In 2001, 19.0 million tonnes of ...
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0answers
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Can the phrasal verb 'result in' be followed by a gerund?

Can the phrasal verb 'result in' be followed by a gerund? Example: We regret that this set of factors resulted in electing Trump, but it is time to move on. The accused expresses his regret that the ...
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1answer
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“disqualify from” or “disqualify of” or “disqualify as”? [closed]

If Jim do such a thing, then he is no more a trustworthy person. I want to rephrase what is meant by the above sentence with the verb "disqualify". Doing such a thing disqualifies Jim from being/of ...
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1answer
7k views

What's the difference between “work on” and “work at”?

What's the difference between work on and work at for this sentence? The children work hard on/at their homework.
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2answers
2k views

What is the meaning of the phrasal verb 'move about'?

In the Xenophobe's guide to the English, page 54, under the heading Sense of Humour, the authors, Antony Miall and David Milsted, state that: English humour is as much about recognition as it is ...
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1answer
355 views

Grammar for kick off something [duplicate]

Macmillan Dictionary gives the following use of the phrase kick off (among others): kick someone off something INFORMAL to force someone to leave a place or activity Recently I encountered a ...
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1answer
358 views

When and by whom was the rule for using 'compare to' versus 'compare with' first recorded?

A longstanding question on English Language & Usage asks "Compared with" vs "Compared to"—which is used when? and has drawn several useful answers. But the question doesn’t ...
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5answers
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Bill O’Reilly Is Forced Out at Fox News

Bill O’Reilly has been forced out of his position as a prime-time host on Fox News, the company said on Wednesday, after the disclosure of settlements involving sexual harassment allegations against ...
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1answer
710 views

What is the right meaning of “is held up to something”?

This all raises the question as to whether it is appropriate to look to athletic figures as role models and whether they should be held up to circumspect levels of conduct. With the constant ...
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1answer
9k views

“hold on” vs. “hold up” in informal English

To convey "wait a second" I always thought that "hold on" was the right phrasal verb. However I saw an American cartoon yesterday repeatedly using "hold up" to express the same. Is that correct or was ...
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2answers
2k views

What parts of speech are the words “pick up” when used as a verb

I'm aware of the difference between "pick up" and "pickup" but what grammatical purpose do the individual words serve when separated? How would you distinguish between them or classify them if you ...
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1answer
672 views

What does “to fall to upon” mean here?

And they fell to upon their frugal supper. (From Vanity Fair) I can only find either to fall to, or to fall on / upon, but never to fall to on / upon.
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1answer
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Is “to put in” a phrasal verb here?

If I had the pen of a Napier, or a Bell's Life, I should like to describe this combat properly. It was the last charge of the Guard—(that is, it would have been, only Waterloo had not yet taken ...
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1answer
23k views

“Provide us with X” or “provide us X”? [closed]

Does provide need the preposition with, or is it truly ditransitive? Kindly provide us with your best quotation Kindly provide us your best quotation. He provided directions. He provided ...
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1answer
3k views

Think up vs come up with vs make up

As an ESL teacher, I was teaching my students some verbal idioms. I did not encounter any problems explaining to them the definition of each until we reached make up, think up vs come up with. I find ...
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2answers
91 views

Is 'slug away' a phrasal verb?

I found slug away in a dictionary which says it is a verb. I'm a little bit confused now. I have a similar one slog away.Are both of them phrasal verbs having the same meaning?
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4answers
16k views

Is there a phrasal verb with the meaning 'understand'?

Find a phrasal verb which is similar in meaning to the word "understand"
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1answer
65 views

What is the difference between “pad out to“ and “pad out with”?

I have read an article that says; We then have to pad out the JPEG header to the length of 0x2F2A with nulls but in my mind, it should be We then have to pad out the JPEG header with the ...
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2answers
2k views

Thanks for checking this video out VS checking out this video [duplicate]

I heard both phrases in some YouTube videos and I am not sure which one's correct. Apart from the answer, could you tell me what I should be googling for in order to understand the grammar related to ...
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1answer
6k views

Past tense of “overdue”? [closed]

What is the past tense of "overdue"? The context is billing/invoicing. For example I'd like to say something like this (which I believe is incorrect): "Invoice overdued"
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2answers
20k views

Part with/from/away

I'm confused between part with and part from. What is the rule behind their usage? How do they differ exactly?
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1answer
588 views

Difference between Slice up and Slice off

Slice up/off some onions for me. What would be more appropriate if both are correct and what's the difference?
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1answer
2k views

Make headway in/on/into/with?

I'm having a difficulty using the right preposition with the phrase "make headway". When I looked the word up from online Oxford and Cambridge Dictionaries, I found they use different prepositions. ...
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1answer
311 views

Phrasal verb meaning “to get rid of someone by frightening him/her”? [closed]

Is there such a word? As in: He (word here) the robber. "frighten off" maybe?
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1answer
6k views

Difference between “flip through” and “flick through”

I have always heard the expression flip through a book, but recently I came across the similar flick through a book. The Oxford Dictionary of English gives the meaning of the phrasal verb flip ...
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2answers
699 views

What is the appropriate usage of the idiom using 'set ..'?

I came across the following question in a textbook. All are about the idiom using 'set', and the answer was found to be "set out". I looked each over in the dictionary and I found 'set out',...
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1answer
2k views

Meaning of “take down” in “I met her at some dinner and took her down.”

I've encountered this particular use in Greville Fane (1893) on two different occasions and am quite perplexed by the actual meaning as none of the meanings for that idiom given by the dictionary seem ...
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1answer
318 views

Why do Indians use “refer (object)” instead of “refer to (object)”?

I've noticed this being done by all my offshore Indian colleagues. They say and write things like, "Please refer attachment" or "Refer the documentation page", instead of "Please refer to the ...
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4answers
1k views

Getting on or off a horse-drawn carriage [closed]

I am writing a story and I was wondering if there was any particular way of saying that the protagonist got off a horse drawn carriage? She is the passenger in the carriage and I wanted to make the ...

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