Questions tagged [phrasal-verb-split]

applies to splitting phrasal verbs and arranging their objects (e.g. pick up the phone v.s. pick the phone up)

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Odd sounding phrasal verb splits with specific pronouns. Are there rules? [duplicate]

Give the examples... A: Did you check it out? Did you check the book out? Did you check Netflix out? Did you check the recommendation out? Did you clean it out? Did you wipe it off? Did you log it ...
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109 views

“… takes as input …” vs “… takes input as …”

Why did the author place "as" between the verb take and the preposition here? Give an efficient algorithm that takes as input a desired accuracy ϵ > 0 and returns a simple cycle C for which r(C)≥ r*...
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66 views

Word order for a split verb [duplicate]

If I have a split verb, such as "pick up" and I am a addressing a third person, I can say either: I will pick Fred up at 11am. Or: I will pick up Fred at 11am. For the second person, we have: ...
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3answers
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How do they look <on her> <her on>? [closed]

Considering that They look him on as a callous predator. http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/matthew-norman-my-sympathy-for-gary-glitter-516838.html Would this be true: How do ...
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Is “read back through the logs” a valid use of the phrasal verb?

Can "back" split the phrasal verb like this to emphasize that one is going through the logs in reverse chronological order? In general, is splitting phrasal verbs a good idea?
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The expression “Call off” as a meaning of “Postpone” [closed]

As a synonym of "postpone", "call off" can be used. But, I can't understand why "call off" has a meaning of "postpone". Please tell me its origin.
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1answer
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Why it is not possible to put a noun object after the particle when the object refers to a person with some phrasal verbs ? Is there a specific rule?

For example: X pulled off the sweater or X pulled the sweater off but let someone off the hook not let off the hook someone to knock over the car or to knock the car over and to knock the child ...
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How are (any) phrasal verbs used with nouns? [duplicate]

I was unable to find anything worthwhile, so I'm eager to ask it here. Is it fully correct to put the "it" in the middle and say "turn it down" (or any other phrasal verb)? Can I say both "He took up ...
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2answers
712 views

When can we change the order of the particle and the verb in a phrasal verb?

My textbook says this: Be careful with word order when using phrasal verbs. The verb and particle cannot be separated: when it is a three-part phrasal verb I caught up with Jack further ...
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225 views

“Bring down X” vs. “bring X down” [duplicate]

I am unable to understand the difference between these two sentences: I want him to bring down the opponents. I want him to bring the opponents down. Which is right and when should each be ...
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4answers
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Is it correct to change the common structure in these phrasal verbs?

I just read a book to learn English. And the topic I read is about the phrasal verbs, but a big doubt has come up to my mind. Is it correct to change the position of the preposition (putting it with ...
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2answers
947 views

“put X down to” vs. “put down X to”: subjects of verbs with two particles

I expect I would have to put down many coats to do the job. (SOURCE) One factor to distinguish phrasal verbs from prepositional verbs is particle movement. Phrasal verbs can place the particle before ...
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2answers
4k views

“Plugging in X” vs. “plugging X in”

Does one say Plugging in that value into the previous equation... or Plugging that value in the previous equation... or something else?