Questions tagged [phrasal-adjectives]

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28
votes
6answers
6k views

What's a word for the shape of the space among the trees in a forest?

I'm writing a proposal that contrasts systems with two different geometries. I'm looking for a word or short phrase (preferably non-technical), that would describe one of the geometries, which is ...
14
votes
1answer
5k views

Fractions as phrasal (compound) adjectives

Is there a difference between a written-out fraction that serves as a noun: He gave me one half of his sandwich. and a written-out fraction serving as an adjective: I gave her a one-half share ...
10
votes
3answers
6k views

article heading should be “Experiment setup” or “Experimental setup”?

My advisor insists on using a heading "Experimental Setup" in his science journal articles. I always cringed a little, thinking it should be "Experiment setup" instead. Now I am writing an article and ...
8
votes
1answer
75k views

What is the correct usage: In the morning vs. On the morning? [closed]

In the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team. Or On the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team .
7
votes
5answers
889 views

Is ‘suit-wearing’ an adjective sui generis?

I was interested to find the term, “Occupy Wall Street’s suit-wearing cousin” appearing in a May 31 New York Times article titled Facing down the Bankers. It begins with the following line: Dennis ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

“Dead simple..” vs. “Really simple..”

I'm writing copy for a new web application and I'm having some trouble with it. On one headline I've written "It's dead simple ...", but while my client was reviewing it he asked if this is not too '...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

Differences between “inasmuch as” vs “as much as” [closed]

Can anyone provide me with some examples illustrating the differences between mentioned adjectives. Is it possible to use them interchangeably on various occasions?
7
votes
3answers
4k views

“Italy-based company” or “Italian-based company”

When referring to a company that is based in Italy, I am never sure which of the above is correct. Logically speaking, "Italy-based" seems the most appropriate (since the company is based in Italy, ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “purse-lipped mother-in-law” an established word representing for a woman who is censoriousness and nagging about everything?

I found an interesting phrase, “purse-lipped mother-in-law” in the following lines of the article titled “The newspaper that rules Britain,” which appeared in New Yorker magazine, April 2nd, 2012 ...
4
votes
2answers
490 views

How are compound adjectives nominalised?

There are compound adjectives in which each word is inflected (as adjective). When they are nominalised, should each adjective be separately nominalised or only the ultimate word? The concrete ...
4
votes
1answer
183 views

I threw a coin in a well that [was] or [is] in the forest [duplicate]

Which statement is correct and why? I threw a coin in a well that was in the forest. vs I threw a coin in a well that is in the forest. Also, is the "is/was" before "in the forest" called a ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

Awkwardness around 'go live' phrase [closed]

Context: software company training documents. We commonly use the phrase "go live" when talking about making a system operational. I'm fine with using it as two separate words, but it becomes awkward ...
3
votes
4answers
323 views

Quote positioning on a long sarcastic-explanation phrase

In the following excerpt, would it be more correct to close the quotation after "pose"? ...and they stand in the ISO-standard "security man waiting for you to walk through the door so he can escort ...
3
votes
3answers
700 views

“Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped? How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? "One-Day Only Promotion" or "One-Day-Only Promotion" Which is ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Different types of “pride”

At one point while browsing the internet I came across an article that had wonderful adjectives for the different types of pride one can feel. Unfortunately I didn't bookmark it, and I can't find it! ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the adjective form of “black humo(u)r”?

If one were to describe a statement by referring to "black humour", how should he/she go about forming the adjectival form of the term? "blackly humourous" or "black humourous"
3
votes
2answers
134 views

Is there a name for somebody you’re jealous of?

I'm trying to describe King Saul's suicide out of fear of his rival David, of-whom-he-is-jealous. Is there a better way to describe this?
3
votes
1answer
188 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
2
votes
2answers
53 views

Why does the adjective “suitable” come after “hands-on activities”?

Please clarify the grammar used in the sentence below. Most museums provide hands-on activities suitable for both children and adults. Question: Why is the adjective "suitable for" placed after ...
2
votes
2answers
598 views

Is it acceptable to italicize a compound descriptor instead of hyphenating it?

I'm having a disagreement about how to treat a compound descriptor like "This is one of those everyone-shut-up-and-go-away kind of days." It has been claimed to me that this descriptor can just as ...
2
votes
3answers
71 views

Looking for a specific synonym of “selfish” [duplicate]

A word or phrase that describes best a specific type of person or their behavior. The type of person that would not act upon a threat if said threat is not affecting their personal well-being directly....
2
votes
3answers
326 views

Word or phrase used to describe someone who controls someone else through possessions or financial means

Not sure if such a phrase or word to describe a person/actions actually exists. Have been using “to lord something over someone,” but this might not be the correct usage. ex1: If someone pays for a ...
2
votes
2answers
154 views

What does 'removed from' mean when it's used with some type of material?

The following is a quote from the computer science classic, "The Mythical Man-Month" (1975). Finally, there is the delight of working in such a tractable medium. The programmer, like the poet, ...
2
votes
2answers
682 views

Use of apostrophe in adjective phrase containing a possessive

I work and write for a tech company that has created many first-in-the-world technologies. In press releases, I often write something like “[Company name] today announced another world’s first with ...
2
votes
2answers
180 views

“Two separate nouns + based” as the attribute?

In scientific writing, it is correct to write something like The filter-based method is good. But what if I have two nouns before -based? Something like The lowpass filter-based method is good. ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“It is happy for me to …” and “It is glad for me to…”

Okay, so my students in Japan keep using “it is happy for me to…” “…it is glad for me to…” I know it is incorrect and the words happy and glad can be changed with others to make some ...
2
votes
1answer
619 views

What about adjective “especial” for a person?

I read about the use of especial and special. But I'm not sure if applies the same when describing a person. For instance, do you say: I am an especial person. or I am a special person.
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is it preferable to generally use nested prepositional phrases or a hyphenated adjectival phrase?

I've recently run into some sticky situations involving how to write out complicated concept descriptions. Take this example: Which metrics are appropriate for evaluating the accuracy of a ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Adjective for someone who knows their limits

I am looking for adjectives for describing a person who knows their limits, what they are capable of and what not, knows their weak and strong points. Usage example: When you are going through a new ...
1
vote
2answers
531 views

Adjectives used with intransitive verbs in lieu of adverbs

I certainly wouldn't argue that "I feel good" should be replaced with "I feel well," but I have forgotten what we used to call the adjective in this type of construction. Adjective predicate? ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is there any adjective for describing a person who prefers his/her friends to his/her family?

I'm looking for an adjective /idiom /expression /phrase with a negative connotation, for describing someone who spends their time mostly with their friends, and prefer their friends to their own ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

hyphenation of adjective phrases [duplicate]

Should adjectival phrases that are hyphenated when they modify a noun, e.g. a case-sensitive password, be hyphenated when they are predicate adjectives, e.g. The password is case-sensitive?
1
vote
1answer
352 views

How to hyphenate a phrasal adjective: PCI-compliant

I have a phrase I use often in my work, but I'm not sure if I'm hyphenating it correctly. As it stands, I've been writing it like this: The PCI-compliant payment gateway... I think PCI-compliant is a ...
1
vote
1answer
300 views

“Is far from…” - How do I connote the simile, without the literal connotation?

In using a contrasting simile, I think I have fallen into a trap. I want to say: The academy is far from a placid house of learning. In the sense of: The academy is not at all a serene place ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is it “invoice receivables” or “invoices receivable”?

The latter follows the analogy of accounts receivable as a post-positive adjective.
1
vote
1answer
995 views

What does “fresh-off-the-vine technologies” mean?

Time magazine (February 11) carries an article reviewing the fast evolution of drone technology and problems and opportunities involved with President Obama’s “drone campaign”, under the title Drone ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror film,...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

definite article 'a'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, pag 529, says: Predeterminer AdjPs (e.g., such a nuisance, or so serious a problem) occur as external modifier in NP structure, preceding the ...
1
vote
2answers
246 views

Can one get away with using the root “surl” from the adjective “surly” in a sentence?

It always strikes me as odd when an adjective that ends in y doesn't have a dictionary defined root noun (funny≈fun; angry≈anger; silly≠sill; etc). More specifically, I'm trying to write a lyric, and ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

noun + the + adjective [duplicate]

We learned in school that in English always "adjective +noun".But in "Cyrus the great" or "Alexander the great" is "noun+the+adjective". What is the name of the phrase? When could we use that phrase?
1
vote
1answer
245 views

Why are nouns in counting adjectival phrases singular?

Basically, why is it: "two-item plate" "three-person table" "two-man race" I was trying to find a rule (or a style guide reference or something) that I could pass on to a friend that explains why ...
1
vote
2answers
725 views

Word for something being a misnomer - “misnomerous”? “misnomatic”? [closed]

What is the word used to describe something as being a misnomer?
1
vote
1answer
387 views

as little as 1 day as an adjective object phrase of a preposition

You can get your money back in as little as 1 day! It is a sentence I heard from an advertisement. Sadly, I cannot tell if this is what the advertisement said, for I did not pay much attention to ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Why did the author use “muttering” instead of “mutters” in this sentence?

"He wanders away from the group, muttering something about fingers and toes." - The hunger game, Mockingjay. And can you give me the name of this grammar structure? Is it short form of relative ...
1
vote
3answers
431 views

Adjective phrase for a time?

I wrote a sentence that I don't know is correct. The presence of the doctor after the incident matters to every patient. I think "after the incident" is used as an adjectival phrase. But there ...
1
vote
1answer
8k views

Offroad, off road, or off-road?

My instincts tell me that the following phrase should be "2014 and newer off-road equipment." When I Google it, I see all of the these: offroad, off road, and off-road. Is there a correct one? Or ...
1
vote
1answer
753 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

What is the equivalent of a “Good Watch” for an audiobook or record?

We say that a movie is a "good watch" and a book is a "good read". Somehow, to say that an audiobook or an album is a "good listen" doesn't sound right to my ears, but perhaps that's only because I'...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Game-development-oriented or game development-oriented? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? “Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? As the title states, which is the correct hyphenation of ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Hyphenation of Compound Adjective

Is this correct: Representation of a 4 to 9-node-quadrilateral element? and this: which is the case of a multi-degree of freedom problem?