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Questions tagged [phrasal-adjectives]

The tag has no usage guidance.

2
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2answers
51 views

Why does the adjective “suitable” come after “hands-on activities”?

Please clarify the grammar used in the sentence below. Most museums provide hands-on activities suitable for both children and adults. Question: Why is the adjective "suitable for" placed after ...
2
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3answers
47 views

Looking for a specific synonym of “selfish”

A word or phrase that describes best a specific type of person or their behavior. The type of person that would not act upon a threat if said threat is not affecting their personal well-being directly....
2
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2answers
150 views

Word or phrase used to describe someone who controls someone else through possessions or financial means

Not sure if such a phrase or word to describe a person/actions actually exists. Have been using “to lord something over someone,” but this might not be the correct usage. ex1: If someone pays for a ...
1
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1answer
45 views

definite article 'a'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, pag 529, says: Predeterminer AdjPs (e.g., such a nuisance, or so serious a problem) occur as external modifier in NP structure, preceding the ...
1
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1answer
85 views

Hyphenation of Compound Adjective

Is this correct: Representation of a 4 to 9-node-quadrilateral element? and this: which is the case of a multi-degree of freedom problem?
0
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1answer
103 views

What part of speech is “care” in the following sentences?

Joe is the student with the highest grade With the highest grade is an adjective phrase modifying student, with "with" being a preposition and "highest" being the adjective. But in the following ...
1
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2answers
126 views

Can one get away with using the root “surl” from the adjective “surly” in a sentence?

It always strikes me as odd when an adjective that ends in y doesn't have a dictionary defined root noun (funny≈fun; angry≈anger; silly≠sill; etc). More specifically, I'm trying to write a lyric, and ...
1
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1answer
38 views

noun + the + adjective [duplicate]

We learned in school that in English always "adjective +noun".But in "Cyrus the great" or "Alexander the great" is "noun+the+adjective". What is the name of the phrase? When could we use that phrase?
1
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1answer
269 views

How to hyphenate a phrasal adjective: PCI-compliant

I have a phrase I use often in my work, but I'm not sure if I'm hyphenating it correctly. As it stands, I've been writing it like this: The PCI-compliant payment gateway... I think PCI-compliant is a ...
0
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0answers
37 views

Grammatically correct to say 'The document, “come” back to haunt us, was causing trouble'

Would it be grammatically correct to say 'The document, come back to haunt us, was causing a lot of trouble'. I am familiar with this phrase but I recently encountered it used in a way similar to ...
0
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3answers
210 views

Adjective for having enough and satisfactory food [closed]

I have eaten enough food. The food was delicious and may be I have eaten a lot more than required. I enjoyed it. Now I am very happy about it. How to describe this? Should we say "I have had enough ...
2
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1answer
1k views

“It is happy for me to …” and “It is glad for me to…”

Okay, so my students in Japan keep using “it is happy for me to…” “…it is glad for me to…” I know it is incorrect and the words happy and glad can be changed with others to make some ...
0
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2answers
78 views

'The snap election results' or 'The snap-election results'? [closed]

Which of the two is grammatically correct? The snap election results are in. The snap-election results are in. The sentence should refer to the results of an election that was announced suddenly and ...
-1
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1answer
850 views

How should the phrase “thank you” be written in the following sentence? [duplicate]

According to prevalent formal writing style rules, Should the phrase be in quotes (as in "thank you" or thank you)? Should T of Thank be capital? Should there be a hyphen? They did not give him a ...
-2
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1answer
40 views

Adjective position [closed]

1.Mathematics teacher 2.Mathematic teacher 3.Teacher in mathematics Which one is grammatically correct ?
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0answers
35 views

Hyphenation Query (Compound words hyphenated alongside adjectival phrases?) [duplicate]

Not sure if I've correctly titled this query; my grammatical lexicon is severely wanting. The phrase in question is from a short story, and is as follows: "More likely a second—floor-apartment ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Should a phrasal adjective be hyphenated when its modifier is omitted?

With modifier: We were going on an air-to-air photo mission. Without: We were going on our first air to air. OR We were going on our first air-to-air.
0
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2answers
67 views

“For him not going” or “his not going”

For him not going to party was a big mistake. His not going to party was a big mistake. I think in the first sentence gives a sense that he is sad as he missed the party. The second sentence ...
0
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1answer
75 views

Left to themselves — is a 'when' needed? [closed]

I read, in Arthur Bloch's hilarious "Murphy's Law", the following corollary to Murphy's Law: Left to themselves, things tend to go from bad to worse. Is that grammatical? Does the clause before ...
1
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2answers
153 views

Is it correct to use 'present' after a noun or pronoun?

Can an adjective go just after a noun? The teachers present in the hall are my life saviours. In this sentence is using 'present in the hall' right or should I say 'presenting in the hall'?
3
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2answers
152 views

What does 'removed from' mean when it's used with some type of material?

The following is a quote from the computer science classic, "The Mythical Man-Month" (1975). Finally, there is the delight of working in such a tractable medium. The programmer, like the poet, ...
28
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6answers
6k views

What's a word for the shape of the space among the trees in a forest?

I'm writing a proposal that contrasts systems with two different geometries. I'm looking for a word or short phrase (preferably non-technical), that would describe one of the geometries, which is ...
1
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1answer
226 views

Why are nouns in counting adjectival phrases singular?

Basically, why is it: "two-item plate" "three-person table" "two-man race" I was trying to find a rule (or a style guide reference or something) that I could pass on to a friend that explains why ...
1
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1answer
254 views

“Is far from…” - How do I connote the simile, without the literal connotation?

In using a contrasting simile, I think I have fallen into a trap. I want to say: The academy is far from a placid house of learning. In the sense of: The academy is not at all a serene place ...
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3answers
1k views

Question about “stranger-than-fiction” in a sentence from the novel “Waterland” [closed]

I am not very clear about the meaning of the phrase "stranger-than-fiction" from the novel "Waterland" that was written by Graham Swift. http://www.fiction2.com/waterland-online-graham-swift?page=0,2 ...
7
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1answer
64k views

What is the correct usage: In the morning vs. On the morning? [closed]

In the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team. Or On the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team .
1
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2answers
647 views

Word for something being a misnomer - “misnomerous”? “misnomatic”? [closed]

What is the word used to describe something as being a misnomer?
2
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2answers
2k views

Adjective for someone who knows their limits

I am looking for adjectives for describing a person who knows their limits, what they are capable of and what not, knows their weak and strong points. Usage example: When you are going through a new ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Drive-up” vs. “Drive-through”

Recently, I've come across these two words: a drive-up machine/restaurant a drive-through restaurant I'm wondering if there's any difference in the meaning. I found that the word drive-...
1
vote
1answer
361 views

as little as 1 day as an adjective object phrase of a preposition

You can get your money back in as little as 1 day! It is a sentence I heard from an advertisement. Sadly, I cannot tell if this is what the advertisement said, for I did not pay much attention to ...
2
votes
1answer
486 views

What about adjective “especial” for a person?

I read about the use of especial and special. But I'm not sure if applies the same when describing a person. For instance, do you say: I am an especial person. or I am a special person.
3
votes
1answer
184 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
1
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1answer
77 views

Why did the author use “muttering” instead of “mutters” in this sentence?

"He wanders away from the group, muttering something about fingers and toes." - The hunger game, Mockingjay. And can you give me the name of this grammar structure? Is it short form of relative ...
1
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3answers
407 views

Adjective phrase for a time?

I wrote a sentence that I don't know is correct. The presence of the doctor after the incident matters to every patient. I think "after the incident" is used as an adjectival phrase. But there ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Is there any adjective for describing a person who prefers his/her friends to his/her family?

I'm looking for an adjective /idiom /expression /phrase with a negative connotation, for describing someone who spends their time mostly with their friends, and prefer their friends to their own ...
8
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3answers
6k views

article heading should be “Experiment setup” or “Experimental setup”?

My advisor insists on using a heading "Experimental Setup" in his science journal articles. I always cringed a little, thinking it should be "Experiment setup" instead. Now I am writing an article and ...
1
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1answer
7k views

Offroad, off road, or off-road?

My instincts tell me that the following phrase should be "2014 and newer off-road equipment." When I Google it, I see all of the these: offroad, off road, and off-road. Is there a correct one? Or ...
4
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2answers
472 views

How are compound adjectives nominalised?

There are compound adjectives in which each word is inflected (as adjective). When they are nominalised, should each adjective be separately nominalised or only the ultimate word? The concrete ...
0
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1answer
9k views

Proceed vs. Proceed further/ahead- Redundancy

In a training session on Business English, the instructor often said, proceed and proceed further, usually, after a pause by the speakers or whenever he interrupted. Examples: I ...
-1
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2answers
96 views

How do I use paired?

In the sentence "they've built roads, ports and stores in our city, but these facts are unpaired to the schooling steep growing levels." I'd like to know two things: Is the usage of "but these facts ...
1
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4answers
211 views

In the context of a grocery store's signage, which is correct - “Everyday” or “Every Day”?

Here is an illustrated example: A grocer may print information pertaining to a low price deal, on the above pictured sign, and attach it to a shelf for customers to see.
2
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2answers
666 views

Use of apostrophe in adjective phrase containing a possessive

I work and write for a tech company that has created many first-in-the-world technologies. In press releases, I often write something like “[Company name] today announced another world’s first with ...
3
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2answers
131 views

Is there a name for somebody you’re jealous of?

I'm trying to describe King Saul's suicide out of fear of his rival David, of-whom-he-is-jealous. Is there a better way to describe this?
0
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1answer
880 views

Can a prepositional phrase starting with “during” work as an adjectival phrase?

A prepositional phrase comprising a preposition and a noun phrase can generally function either as an adjectival phrase or as an adverbial phrase. The book on the table is mine. (The ...
0
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2answers
2k views

What's a word to describe black humor of the variety that criticizes the injustices of the world?

For example, let's say I see a homeless man and woman eating scraps of food next to a garbage fire to keep warm and I say to my friend, "Must be date night" (with undertones of "This is a sad world"). ...
4
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1answer
183 views

I threw a coin in a well that [was] or [is] in the forest [duplicate]

Which statement is correct and why? I threw a coin in a well that was in the forest. vs I threw a coin in a well that is in the forest. Also, is the "is/was" before "in the forest" called a ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Different types of “pride”

At one point while browsing the internet I came across an article that had wonderful adjectives for the different types of pride one can feel. Unfortunately I didn't bookmark it, and I can't find it! ...
1
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1answer
477 views

Adjectives used with intransitive verbs in lieu of adverbs

I certainly wouldn't argue that "I feel good" should be replaced with "I feel well," but I have forgotten what we used to call the adjective in this type of construction. Adjective predicate? ...
0
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2answers
50 views

What terms should be used to mean the different states of attendance of volunteers in a clinical study?

In a clinical trail with several visits, it is common to see volunteers not attending their visits at some time point for different reasons. I have these different situations, and I would like to know ...
1
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1answer
723 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...