Questions tagged [phonetics]

Phonetics (pronounced /fəˈnɛtɪks/, from the Greek: φωνή, phōnē, 'sound, voice') is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign.

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3
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4answers
187 views

Easily recognizable spoken words

I'm looking for terms that describe easily recognizable spoken words. I think this could be in phonology/phonetics but I'm unsure where in particular as I have no formal background. I apologize if ...
5
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1answer
409 views

Is it common to vocalize syllabic L, but use dark L as a coda consonant after unreduced vowels?

This question is about words that end in a syllabic L like little /ˈlɪtl/ capital /ˈkæpɪtl/ able /ˈeɪbl/ bible /ˈbaɪbl/ syllable /ˈsɪləbl/ Question 1: Is it common for people who usually ...
3
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2answers
447 views

Different /ə/ pronunciation at the end of a word; for example, in “phenomena”

Sorry for my English but I'm a self-taught beginner. That's why I had been looking at the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) with high hopes until I saw phenomenon’s plural form. In the singular, ...
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2answers
704 views

Is the “ng” sound often pronounced simultaneously with the “n” sound?

Don't native speakers in some regions pronounce [ŋ] simultaneously with the [n] sound in order to connect it without releasing the "g"? For instance, can the word "singer" instead of sɪŋ·ər, be ...
0
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1answer
388 views

Why does /ɪ/ often sound like /ə/?

For example if you listen to the pronounciation for "seminar" on Oxfordlearner dictionary it sounds like an /ə/ to me. BrE /ˈsemɪnɑː(r) https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/...
4
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1answer
331 views

Should I pronounce the singular “Irishman” and the plural “Irishmen” identically?

Can someone tell me how to pronounce the following: Irishman/Irishmen I have read carefully, according to the online Oxford Living Dictionaries, the pronunciation of words like Irishman/Irishmen: ...
0
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1answer
75 views

How to pronounce the “s” of pupils [duplicate]

How to pronounce the "s" at the end of pupils. What is the phonetic of this word.
4
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1answer
649 views

Is there a difference between the pronunciation of the “n” in “now” and the “n” in “counsel”?

When I say the "n" in "now" - the tip of my tongue touches touches the roof of my mouth When I say the " n" in "counsel", the tip of the tongue doesnt touch the roof of the mouth or between my teeth. ...
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2answers
726 views

Why does the “-ed” suffix give “wanted” a second syllable, when “based” or “looked” only have one?

Why is it that wanted has 2 syllables, but based has 1 syllable. The root of these words, want and base, are both monosyllablic. And both of these past tense forms end with the same -ed suffix: ...
2
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1answer
63 views

“I die” and “I’d die”

I have a question about the pronunciation between “I die” and “I’d die”. If I consider linking words and link the “d” in “I’d and the d in “die”, the pronunciation of I DIE and I’D DIE would be the ...
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0answers
67 views

When to expect a *kn*

Here is a personally inspired question, but I hope it finds broader relevance. Without clear specific roots, what phonetically indicates that a word is spelled with a kn rather than an n? Recently a ...
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2answers
2k views

Psychology of diphthongs

First of all, technically this probably should be at the English Language Learners site, because I'm an English learner, but my intuition says I'll probably get more useful answers here because of my ...
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1answer
107 views

Term for toddler-mispronounced words

Is there a single-word equivalent to "child speech"? A term that would convey that a toddler, still learning the language, has mispronounced a word?
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2answers
1k views

Do Americans who have the cot–caught merger pronounce 'all', 'tall', 'Paul', etc. with the same vowel quality as 'lot'?

Do American English speakers who pronounce cot and caught as [kʰɑt] pronounce all, tall, Paul, etc. with the same vowel quality? If my subjective experience is anything to go by, I feel like I've ...
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1answer
400 views

Why does the schwa sounds like an 'e' in some words? [closed]

I've noticed that in some words the schwa sounds more like 'e' and not 'ə', for exmaple: environment(.mənt), is with a schwa, but sounds like 'e'. Also in a word like 'substance'-stance doesn't sound ...
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0answers
24 views

What symbol to use for pronunciation help [duplicate]

I am looking to enforce that my letter "a" should be pronounced as "ah". In my book I am writing I have the name Gorak (Gore-ahk). What would be the best way to explicitly show that it is Gore-Ahk ...
6
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3answers
3k views

Is /kləʊðz/ really the correct phonetic transcription of the word “clothes”?

I hope this question fits the group. As a teacher of EFL I have come across this question several times: Question: Does "/kləʊðz/" provide the right phonemic representation of the final sound in the ...
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1answer
2k views

Are [ɪ] and [i] are allophones of the same phoneme in English? [closed]

I am leaning towards no, but would like confirmation and perhaps an example to illustrate.
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1answer
77 views

What is the tolerance on formants?

On Wikipedia, there is a list of phonetic vowels and their average 1st and 2nd formants. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formant#Formants_and_phonetics Throughout the web are many more of such charts ...
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0answers
329 views

What is the phonetic transcription for my pronunciation of /l/?

Please listen to my pronunciation. http://vocaroo.com/i/s0DWEjzb1GpG When I say "seagull", when making the L sound, my tongue makes contact with the area behind my front teeth. It's an /l/. But ...
2
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1answer
595 views

Why does the Cambridge Dictionary use /eɪ/ for the vowel sound in “Sea Bass”?

Why does the Cambridge Dictionary use /eɪ/ as the vowel sound in bass in "Sea Bass"? Is this caused by the plosive sound of B? I think my ear is not distorted. It should be: Sea Bass = /ˈsiː ...
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1answer
387 views

Is initial d becoming unvoiced in (many varieties of) English?

I believe I heard once that initial d in English is historically becoming less voiced. But I cannot find references confirming that. Is it true? And if it is, then is it part of an identifiable ...
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1answer
274 views

“I like hear good news”

I'd like to know whether it's common in informal speech to delete the infinitive particle "to" in the construction 'to hear sth.' This video shows an example at 6:36; I've analysed it at 0.5 speed, ...
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2answers
107 views

Can the /t/ and /v/ sounds be dropped in “what,” “that” and “of”? [closed]

Is it ok to drop the 't' sound in these example: wha that (what that) tha the (that the) & the 'v' (like in the the word 'of') sound matter o fact (mater of fact) of course, to a native ...
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1answer
102 views

Does this mixture between pronunciations have a name?

If a person pronounces a word with the sound /ɒ/, for example not, but says /kɑr/ instead of /kɑː/, does this mixture receive a name?
4
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1answer
204 views

Am I wrong when I think that I can hear the two different ways they pronounce “flap T”?

When I listen to the Beatles' "LET IT BE", I can distinctly hear that the first T is pronounced like Polish or Russian or Spanish "R", only more quickly and softer. But when I watch "The Negative ...
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2answers
873 views

How to spell out short vowel pronunciations

Let me put it concisely: How would you write a word to pronounce like 'o' in 'hot'? (short vowel o) How would you write a word to pronounce like 'a' in 'sat'? (short vowel a) How would you write a ...
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1answer
168 views

Elvis Presley's pronunciation of 'dancing' in his “jailhouse rock” /'dæn(t)ɪn/

I'd like to know the IPA narrow transcription of his pronunciation of 'dancing' in "jailhouse rock", as well as what phonological process makes it possible. It seems like intrusive /t/ deletes the ...
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1answer
460 views

When was the velarized allophone of /l/ (IPA [ɫ]) formed in English?

English, Portuguese, Dutch, and Russian all have velarized [ɫ] at the syllable coda. When did this start happening in English?
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2answers
1k views

Pronunciation and transcription of the vowel in “fear”, “dear”, “near” etc

I wonder, words like fear, dear, near and so on have long e in pronunciation, and it should be transcribed as /i:/, but I've found it transcribed as short /ɪ/. Why is that?
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2answers
3k views

What is the most common sound for each of the vowel letters (a, e, i, o, u) of American English?

For each of the vowel letters of American English, what is the most commonly used sound of each of them. That is, what is the most commonly used sound that represents the letter "a", the most ...
16
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4answers
4k views

Why is /sɪ/ pronounced differently in “six” /sɪks/ and “sit” /sɪt/?

six /sɪks/ and sit /sɪt/ Why do they have the same phonetic symbol /sɪ/, if /sɪ/ is pronounced differently in those two words? The main focus in my question isn't the difference in pronunciation ...
17
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10answers
4k views

Is the mispronunciation of foreign words especially likely in English?

Are there other languages out there, more phonetic than English, in which the sound of foreign words can be specified adequately? For example, is it the case that when Arabs move to America their ...
4
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3answers
2k views

Is there any word with two consecutive monophthongs whose symbols could be combined to a diphthong? [closed]

For example, ɔ and ɪ in one word one after another. Note that I talking about a situation where the symbols could be combined as written l, not the sounds. IPA does not have explicit different written ...
6
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2answers
726 views

difference between the OALD pronunciation of /i/ in happy /ˈhæpi/ and /ɪ/ in sit /sɪt/?

I wanted to learn more about phonetics and I stumbled across this website: http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/about/english/pronunciation_english However, I couldn't get what the ...
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2answers
2k views

Silent /d/ or /t/

When a word ending with the /d/ or /t/ sound is pronounced and the next word starts with a consonant, the sounds /d/ or /t/ are silent. For example: I used to play tennis. My question is related to ...
6
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1answer
555 views

/ɪ/ sound when not stressed

I've seen that some words in English are pronounced with the /ɪ/ sound when the vowel is not stressed. Some examples include: pocket /ˈpɒkɪt/, comet /ˈkɒmɪt/. But hundred /ˈhʌndrəd/. Is there any ...
2
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1answer
186 views

pronunciation of the sequence '-edness'

I'd like to know whether the pronunciation of nominalizations from a participle + -ness, such as fixedness (putting aside adjectives with full pronunciation such as 'wickedness') is similar to that of ...
6
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1answer
347 views

Can the modal verb “can” be pronounced as /ŋ(k)/?

Can the modal verb "can" be pronounced as /ŋ(k)/ ? It may be the context of a following /k/, as in "we can come and see", but I have also notice it being reversed /ŋ(k)/. Therefore, I'd like to ...
4
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1answer
2k views

How is the word “saw” pronounced in the US, specifically, New York?

English is my second language, therefore I have trouble grasping certain words phonetically. When I speak with my co-workers, sometimes and almost always, they pronounce the word saw as sawr, like, ...
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1answer
607 views

Why are some long vowels transcribed with single, short IPA vowels? [closed]

When transcribing English vowels phonetically, long vowel sounds are usually written with two IPA vowels when the vowel is at the end of word or syllable: paper /pei-/ But sometimes long vowels ...
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2answers
2k views

Why is the letter “c” pronounced like /s/ when it comes before “e”, “i”, or “y”, but as /k/ elsewhere?

Could you please tell me why from an historical point of view that when the letter c comes directly before the letters e, i or y in English that we use the /s/ sound, but in other cases we use the /k/ ...
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1answer
3k views

What's the meaning of /e/, /i:/, /a:/, /z/ and /p/?

I was doing homework with the kid and I found this. Can anyone explain what this is about?
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2answers
627 views

“All of” pronunciation [duplicate]

I'm from a place where there is no "L" in the language, and it's always been tricky to say. Well, I did some research and, at least for American-English, there are two types: A "light L" and a "dark ...
4
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2answers
2k views

Is there a way to phonetically write English so that when read it is with a “British accent”? [closed]

I am going to be performing a monologue which will mostly be in a southern accent, but there is one brief part, where I quote a British person, and would like to give it a general British accent. Is ...
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2answers
364 views

The pronunciation of “try to” vs. “tried to”

I know that try to is pronounced /tɹaɪɾə/, but how is tried to pronounced? It wouldn't make sense for it to have the same pronunciation, because then we wouldn't be able to differentiate between ...
0
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2answers
595 views

Why is the English Alphabet pronounced non-phonetically? [closed]

Ok, so with the phonetic alphabet, there is a 1 to 1 correspondence with how we actually say a letters in a word and how it's actually read outloud. That is, according to the phonetic alphabet, the ...
2
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0answers
319 views

English pronunciation symbols – why so many systems? [closed]

I wanted to improve my English pronunciation. But I just realize that I cannot understand the symbols in my English dictionaries (including some online dictionaries). There are so many, just look at ...
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1answer
338 views

What phonetic alphabet is used here?

Can someone tell me what phonetic alphabet is used here? Also, how is this word pronounced? Update: This is a scientific term from a 1976 National Bureau of Standards manual. The original word is ...
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0answers
152 views

The perception of /ɑ/ and /a/

The Cambridge Dictionary transcription for the word barn is /bɑːrn/ If someone says this word as /baːrn/ (open front vowel), will this sound foreign to you? Will you notice at all? What will your ...