Questions tagged [philology]

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Qur'anic Studies: Meaning of the word "tooth" [closed]

In the meantime, Luxenberg has made two proposals that relate to the question of how the text was first written. First, he argues that the “Ur-Qur’an” sometimes used a single “tooth” as mater ...
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2 votes
1 answer
237 views

Shakespeare’s Subjunctive

Shakespeare’s Macbeth famously says, “If it were done, when ‘tis done, then ‘twere well it were done quickly,” which I rearranged, according to my understanding, as, “‘Twere well it were done quickly, ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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English Philology vs English studies difference in meaning and connotations for Natives?

In Poland, English University major is called "English Philology" (pol. Filologia Angielska), and this is how it is usually translated and communicated. By the Poles. When you google English ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Eponymous adjective formation

I’m writing an essay on Homer’s Odyssey, and I was wondering whether the correct adjectival form would be Odysseian or Odyssean according to etymology, as I’ve seen both used in academic contexts. I ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Is there a word to designate grammatical constructions such as "all the more since" or "as long as"?

Do philologists have a single word to refer to grammatical constructions such as all the more since or as long as, or is 'grammatical construction' the most compact way to refer to those kinds of ...
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3 answers
2k views

Boilerplate versus Template

I'm Finnish IT-professional and done front-end -web developement mostly in my past. I like natural languages too and today I started to struggle with difference between two IT-related English word. ...
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2 votes
0 answers
86 views

Meaningless "Do" And the supposed relationship between English and the Celtic languages [duplicate]

The verb "do" often serves a meaningless purpose in questions. John McWhorter argues in his book "Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue" that this is a direct influence of the Celtic languages. In all of my ...
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Ancient greek philosophy - looking for a quotation of the kind: "I am scared for the future, I don't trust the youth of today"

I am looking for a famous quotation that was written by an ancient greek philosopher and that basically convey the following idea: I am scared for the future, I don't trust the youth of today Do ...
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1 answer
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What does it mean that two languages are genetically unrelated? [closed]

I would like to know what does it mean that two languages are genetically unrelated? I have seen answer in this topic Genetic Relatives what does it mean that languages are genetically realted but ...
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2 answers
2k views

-er rather than -lier as an adverbial comparative form

In modern German, one can make tief into the comparative tiefer, regardless of whether the word is used as adjective or adverb. In English, I now have a sentence in which I want to do the same thing ...
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32 votes
5 answers
1k views

When did the term "scientist" overtake usage of the term "natural philosopher"?

The word scientist comes from the Latin scientia, but when did its usage become more prevalent than the term natural philosopher?
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27 votes
4 answers
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Why do written English vowels differ from other Latin-based orthographies?

Written English vowels differ from other Latin-based orthographies. Consider what the written vowels in the romance languages represent. Also, for example, consider this simple comparison between a ...
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Genetic Relatives

In the vein of historical linguistics, what languages (modern or dead) are considered genetically related to English? Also what differences mark a language as a genetic relative vs a language that had ...
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