Questions tagged [personal-pronouns]

Questions related to personal pronoun, an independent pronoun which can have various forms according to gender, number, person, and case.

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Singular–plural choices in subject+verb agreement, notional agreement, and pronouns with ambiguous antecedents [migrated]

The original version of a particular sentence: EWB is a group of engineers that, unlike many engineering corporations, assist people around the world by applying its knowledge to solve problems in ...
6
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2answers
705 views

The Royal We: Who are “we”?

Although King George III of Great Britain did respond to a Loyal Address using the personal pronoun I: My Lords, I thank you for this dutiful and affectionate Address. The satisfaction which you ...
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0answers
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Is capitalization of the personal pronoun “I” a modern thing in English? [duplicate]

In an answer to a question I asked, the user included an extract from a text seemingly written in older English. Not Old English, but definitely older English, made evident by the fact it spelled e.g. ...
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9answers
2k views

The hidden flaw in “singular they”—what to do about reflexive pronouns?

We have a highly regarded answer by nohat to a question about gender-neutral pronouns, in which he points to the "singular they" and its long history of use in English. (Note that he also advises ...
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2answers
69 views

What's the name of this grammar error: “due to him having…” [duplicate]

I know there's something wrong with the way the indirect-object pronoun "him" and the gerund "having" are being used here, but I can't put my finger on it or find it on Google. Here's another example: ...
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1answer
275 views

We three or us three

Does the subject value in the following example need to be "us" or "we". Does it follow the same principle in pluralising the subject where removing one component isolates the correct noun? Dad and ...
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1answer
226 views

Her and her husband proper grammar [duplicate]

I am editing the following sentence, and having an issue with identifying the proper pronoun. “Her and her husband’s journeys and careers have allowed them to travel extensively.” I know the rule ...
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2answers
79 views

Is there any such thing as noun pronoun proximity?

I have read of Concord (or noun-verb agreement) and was wondering if, is as I have been told, there is a similar grammar rule for noun-pronoun agreement/proximity. When there's a sentence where two ...
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5answers
191 views

Is it correct to use “their” when referring to a single person when the gender is known? [duplicate]

I have come accross this sentence: There is a 2.5% probability that whenever we measure a woman, their height will be less than 142 centimeters. Is the use of their correct here? Shouldn't it be ...
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2answers
379 views

Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent “their” or “her” money buying cakes

Can you please tell me if we would use their or her as a possessive pronoun in this sentence? Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent their money buying cakes. Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent ...
6
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1answer
185 views

Analyzing 'genitive/accusative + V-ing phrase (gerund-participle phrase)' as different constructions

(1) I regretted [his leaving the firm]. (2) I regretted [him leaving the firm]. (3) I regretted [leaving the firm]. (4) He didn’t bother [giving me a copy]. Regarding the above ...
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9answers
233k views

When do I use “I” instead of “me?”

From some comments in the answers for common English usage mistakes (now deleted, 10k only), there's confusion around the usage of I vs. me: While the sentence, "the other attendees are myself and ...
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1answer
13k views

“Thou shalt not pass” and “You shall not pass” hybrid

Is it technically incorrect grammar to make a hybrid of the well known statements: "Thou shalt not pass" and "You shall not pass"––this hybrid being: "You shalt not pass"? From what I understand from ...
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2answers
541 views

What is the possessive case and the objective case of “ye?”

I know very well that archaically, "thou" is the nominative case for the modern day "you" while "thee" is the accusative case and that there is no distinction between the nominative and accusative ...
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1answer
45 views

Subject & Object Pronoun Question [duplicate]

What is the rule in use here that allows me to use I do in place of me in the second sentence? An Olympic sprinter on a bad day runs faster than me on a good day. An Olympic sprinter on a bad day ...
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1answer
3k views

“in you_ and your family’s best interests”

I’ve seen this picture of a leaflet being tweeted today. It’s supposedly issued by the UK government and distributed widely: Am I overlooking something or does it really contain the grammar error ...
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6answers
67k views

“Your and my [something]” vs “Yours and my…”

Prompted by comments against this question, I'd like some help figuring out why some people (myself included) prefer yours over the apparently more logical/grammatically consistent your in this kind ...
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6answers
254k views

“My wife and I's seafood collaboration dinner”

I just stumbled upon a Reddit post titled: My wife and I's seafood collaboration dinner. How does it look? Sure enough, the top comment immediately points out that it should be "my wife's and my". ...
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2answers
938 views

Is the signature of a letter a subject or an object?

I want to sign a letter jokingly not by name, but by a personal pronoun. Is the signature a subject or an object? I feel like using object pronoun (me) sounds better, but why? The signature looks more ...
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1answer
31 views

Is the sentence “we are playing with my friend” correct if the “we” only means my friend and me?

My friend says it should be "My friend and I are playing", but I think "We are playing with my friend" is correct too. Is it?
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1answer
73 views

Am I right in thinking modern usage of the word “me” is drifting to “I”; Is there an increasing trend?

In reply to suggested duplicate question: It may be that I can find some useful guidance from the earlier Answer (for which thanks), but I'm really asking whether there's a general trend, particularly ...
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3answers
7k views

Is saying “Let me show you it” totally wrong?

My kids (8-10yrs) love to say things like this. It just rolls naturally out and I correct them often. Is there is a specific reason the grammar is wrong? Maybe for the brain it is more direct than ...
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2answers
102 views

Is it okay to use “he” when the subject of the sentence is “his wife”? [closed]

This is the sentence in question: While Dev’s wife is in India for a few weeks, he and Miranda spend almost every day together. The subject of the sentence is "Dev's wife", and I'm pretty sure that "...
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2answers
52 views

Usage of 'I' and 'Me' [duplicate]

Is there any rule as to what is used in the beginning of a sentence, 'I' or 'Me'? Example: 1) I and x are good friends. 2) Me and x are good friends. Which is correct? Or are both of these ...
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6answers
46k views

“Who wants ice-cream?” — Should I say “(not) I” or “(not) me”?

With the enthusiastic question of "Who wants ice-cream?", what is the more correct response? (Not) I. (Not) me. Neither response is a sentence. The first response of "(not) I" sounds ...
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6answers
223k views

What is the difference between “thee” and “thou”?

What is the difference between thee and thou and how are they used?
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3answers
773 views

How do you refer to the fictional author of a poem?

If a poem is written in the first person, how do you refer to the first person character in the poem? e.g. Underneath the fallen blossom In my bosom, Is a letter I have hid. It was brought ...
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2answers
273 views

Which are right choices in: “Can you imagine him/his forgetting his own birthday?”

Which one of the following is correct? Can you imagine his forgetting his own birthday? Can you imagine him forgetting his own birthday? The question was asked in SNAP 2009 and I can't understand ...
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2answers
8k views

Why do we say “of mine/of his” instead of “of me/of him”?

He's a friend of mine. That's a car of his. Why do we use the possessive when the meaning would be the same while not using it (e.g. a friend of me and a car of him)? I thought maybe it is short ...
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4answers
5k views

“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
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1answer
133 views

“He” refers to whom? [closed]

"Tom said to Sam that he should go to the shop." In the above sentence, 'he' refers to whom? There is ambiguity here,right?. It can mean either tom or sam. So is the sentence above correct? If not, ...
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1answer
92 views

Numerical agreement with “Many a” [duplicate]

Does 'many a' take a singular pronoun or a plural one? Many a is followed by a singular noun. So also does it follow a singular pronoun?
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2k views

Is there a grammatical name for the third-person 'you'?

I've had this conversation several times in my life, where I use a second-person pronoun when actually using the third-person: "If you were dressed up as a clown at night holding black balloons, I ...
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1answer
2k views

“They interviewed several candidates who/whom he thought had the experience he required.” [duplicate]

They interviewed several candidates who he thought had the experience and qualifications he required. My test prep book says this should be "who" because of the subordinate clause's predicate: ...
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2answers
10k views

Between you and (“me” or “I”)? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "between you and me" or "between you and I"? I am not a native English speaker, so please bear with me.
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3answers
2k views

“Being [he/him] is not easy.” Which is prescriptively “correct”?

"It is I" follows a well-known prescriptivist rule This question is about prescriptive grammar. It’s a fairly well-known prescriptivist rule that “me, him, her, them” (in other words, pronouns in the ...
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2answers
1k views

Why is “be” the only English verb that inflects for grammatical person, not just for grammatical number like all the rest of them?

Why do we say “I am a teacher” instead of “I is a teacher” considering that I is a singular pronoun not a plural pronoun? Don’t singulars always take -s forms? Why does be work differently?
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1answer
79 views

A particular occasion for the use of objective forms of personal pronouns

Everybody learns in school that in conventional spoken English one uses "objective" forms of personal pronouns (me, us, him, her, them) for "predicate nominatives" where some conventional formal rules ...
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6answers
13k views

“He” / “she” vs. “it” regarding beloved objects

Is that normal to regard a beloved object (an animal, a car, a book) as he/she? If yes, what gender should be used in this case? One comment in this question touched the tendency to humanize things ...
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2answers
1k views

Using pronoun “it” instead of (personal) pronouns “her” or “him”

Can pronoun "it" be used instead of (personal) pronouns "her" or "him" in a disparaging/derogative manner especially in the personal pronouns? I've watched a movie wherein a dead body was found and, ...
4
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1answer
139 views

What is the correct way to say “It was this week that Justin and my lives changed forever”?

What is the correct way to indicate "Justin and I" as being possessive of our individual lives in this sentence? Is there a way to do this without restructuring the sentence? A friend of mine posted ...
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1answer
63 views

Duplicate but Still cannot understand the concept? [duplicate]

Personal pronouns are confusing. Which one is correct? She went with him and I. Or She went with him and me. - Susan went with Don and "I" to the office. Or Susan went with Don and "...
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4answers
9k views

What are the origins of the regional pronoun “yinz” of southwestern Pennsylvania?

A common informal word used in southwestern Pennsylvania and the forefront example of what is commonly known as "Pittsburghese" is the word yinz, pronounced /jɪnz/ in IPA. Alternatively it is less ...
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4answers
4k views

“the growth of he and his sister” in this sentence from the Guardian

Just read this line on the Guardian: He dismantles his bedroom and helps tidy the house, daubing white paint over the pencil marks on the doorframe which have measured the growth of he and his ...
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2answers
69k views

“Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”

Which is correct: me and my wife or my wife and me? The sentence in which this is used is Ms. Smith informed me and my wife that she was afraid of being accosted.
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0answers
30 views

Is it necessary to use personal pronoun with whatever, whoever etc. everytime?

Consider the following sentences: 1. Whatever you give, I'll eat. 2. Whatever you give, will be eaten. Now consider this: 3.a) Whatever happens, happens for good. 3.b) Whatever happens, it happens for ...
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3answers
107 views

Use of the singular nominative case pronoun [duplicate]

Has the pronoun "me" been discarded from general usage? More and more, I hear people say something like, "He served pizza to my sister and I" or "Between you and I, that dinner was not very good." ...
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1answer
196 views

third person - personal pronoun for AI ( Artificial Intelligence )?

I'm brainstorming on the architecture for an AI system - and describing the interaction with the world - i keep getting back on the question of - how do i refer him/she/it on the third person? Him ...
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1answer
262 views

What possessive is used when “everybody” is the antecedent? [duplicate]

Is this sentence right? Everybody is wasting his time. Is his or its the possessive of everybody? Most people use his but in my opinion it should be its: Everybody is wasting its time. I ...
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2answers
7k views

“I’ll listen to any concerns you or him may have.” Which pronoun do I use here, “he” or “him”?

I had a question about possession. I wrote the sentence: He may need to stay for a while, therefore I’ll listen to any concerns you or him may have.” Is it him or he? Because it sounds natural to ...