Questions tagged [past-participles]

Questions about past participle forms of verbs.

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Adjective: attributive “leftover”, predicative “left over”

Wiktionary's entry for left over reads: Use left over after a verb, in a predicate phrase. When directly before a noun, use leftover. Is this a general productive pattern? Otherwise, any reference ...
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2answers
67 views

What is the word for absence of something?

What is the word used to refer to the absence of something? Let's say that I have a water bottle and, I drink all of the water. I think the word should be an adjective or maybe a past-participle verb ...
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13 views

Tireder (comparative form)

According to the CambridgeGEL, page 1583, Participial adjectives take only analytic comparative forms (A marginal exception is tired) What are the reasons leading to this exception?
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35 views

A question concerning Past Perfect Tense [closed]

I met him in London in 1996. I had seen him last five years before. This is an example given for Present Perfect Tense in my grammar book. Does the sentence mean the last time the speaker had met the ...
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41 views

This sentence is Past Simple or Participle “The sheep all baaed in unison.”?

This sentence "The sheep all baaed in unison." is Past Simple or Participle? And could give me somes examples of Past Simple and Participle using the word "baaed".
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be rid of / get rid of

Finally, I got rid of Karen. / Finally, I was rid of Karen. rid of is a phrasal verb whose direct object is Karen got and was function as copular verbs rid of Karen together is a participle clause (...
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38 views

Identifying a passive voice usage of a past participle

I read in a Stack Exchange answer that the tip to determine whether a past participle is acting as part of passive voice construction in a particular sentence or not is: If it describes an action ...
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2answers
855 views

Woken or Have woken

Woken up late . I had to take a taxi to attend the first lecture. OR Have woken up late . I had to take a taxi to attend the first lecture. Which one is the correct sentence, please help me guys as ...
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47 views

Why is slain a past participle of slay?

Past participles in the English language usually end with -ed, but slain is one exception. Why can't we have just slayed rather than that and slain, too?
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troubling or troubled?

Her troubled/troubling marriage, divorce, and life as a single mother made it even harder for her to write. Is only troubled available here? I think both could be possible. With troubling it could ...
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27 views

Past participle - learned or learnt? [duplicate]

Which is it? Personal preference, I dislike 'learnt', but it's correct in UK English usage - is that right?
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60 views

past-participle–modifier placement

Consider the two sentences: The number of the analyzed data sheets exceeds 1000. The number of the data sheets analyzed exceeds 1000. Which position of the past participle "analyzed" is ...
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2answers
247 views

Why is borne a past participle of bear?

This is a question that people have seldom ever asked. In the English language, past participles are verbs that usually end with "-ed" (or "-ore" for those whose present participles end with "-ear"). ...
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be headed: adjectival -ed vs past participle

(Intransitive) go in particular direction: He headed toward the station. (Transitive) cause something to go somewhere: The pilot headed the plane on a northeasterly course. -ed2 (suffix): ...
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95 views

having been participled?

Is anything wrong in this sentence? The enemy, beaten at every point, fled from the field. According to my book it should instead be: The enemy, having been beaten at every point, fled from the ...
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Past participle as adjective without verb 'to be' [duplicate]

Looking at the clause "... to talk to two separate people or groups involved in a disagreement" is the word 'involved' an adjective here? If it is, shouldn't it be 'that are involved'?
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Postpositive “concerned”: temporary state of affairs

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language reads Postpositive present (or absent) denotes a temporary state of affairs: compare the present government. The same applies to involved and ...
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2answers
122 views

“John was happy about being accepted as a team member.” What part of speech is “accepted”?

John was happy about being accepted as a team member. In one sense, John is an accepted team member, so it could be an adjective. In an other sense, John was accepted by someone, or by the team or ...
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523 views

I am pleased with your answer. Is “pleased” a verb or an adjective? [duplicate]

Your answer pleases me(Active voice) I am pleased with your answer.(passive voice) I think it is difficult to say whether pleased is a participle or an adjective in the ...
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75 views

Verbs different forms in a same sentence

My question is related to the statement mentioned below. In first part after auxiliary verb "is" the main verb is present participle which is "increasing" while in the last part the verb is past ...
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1answer
47 views

“Do you have any wine left?” Is this “have something done” or the past participle form of leave as an attributive

In the sentence "Do you have any wine left?" I think left is the past participle form of the verb "leave" and it is now an adjective. Am I right?
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50 views

The sentence sounds incorrect but comes from respectable book, please review and advise [closed]

Current social standards and a sense of morality in our culture have led to the rejection of prostitution. It has been cast it aside as a deviant behaviour by the prostitute and the client. —The ...
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1answer
50 views

Using auxiliary with past participle

I was searching on the meaning of skirt in Longman dictionary and I found the definition which is: "a piece of outer clothing worn by women and girls", Why did not he say: "a piece of outer clothing ...
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67 views

Use of infinite/-ing: to have someone do something or to have someone doing something

I have a question regarding the use of infinite/-ing (or past participle?) in the following sentence. Which one is correct between "Firms often have some of their executives sitting on the board of ...
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4answers
304 views

Omitting the auxiliary 'have' before the past participle

In examples (1) and (2), the verb escaped is the past participle form, and the auxiliary 'have' seems to have been omitted before 'escaped'. Specifically, I think 'having' and 'he has' are omitted in (...
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1answer
51 views

Could I sometimes indicate completed actions using the passive version of the present tense?

The work is done - The work was done. The action is finished - The action was finished For example, I have just finished my work and say The work is done but when I explain something in the ...
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How to explain the tenses in these sentences?

So my Japanese student is having trouble understanding why the following tenses are used and I’m not sure how to explain it. My line manager wants the meeting arranged immediately. Why does that ...
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60 views

If the past participle of “say” is “said”, and “lay” is “laid”, why the one of “stay” is not “staid”?

I know about the word "staid". Does the past participle of "stay" is "stayed" to avoid confusion with this word? Or the "staid" past participle existed at some time, but it was supplanted by "stayed",...
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522 views

Past participle of stand

I'm new to this community, I hope the question fits this somewhat. Say we have a sentence: The tree which stands in the garden is beautiful. Now using participle construction this becomes: The ...
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2answers
252 views

How do you determine if a pre-modifying past participle is a verb or an adjective? [duplicate]

How do you determine if a past participle--when used as a pre-modifier of a noun--is a verb or an adjective? For example: a. I saw a broken vase. b. I saw a murdered man. I think broken in a. is an ...
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3answers
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What is the difference between had and got?

Are there any significant differences in uses or meanings between these two words? Between the two example sentences below, does one sentence have a slightly different meaning compared to the other, ...
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1answer
119 views

Can “taken” be used without an auxiliary verb? “When taken to this extreme…”

Is it correct to use "taken" without an auxiliary (helping) verb? For example: In some cases, a more powerful racial group justifies the domination and, horribly, even the complete destruction of ...
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3answers
270 views

Is something “candidate” or “candidated” to become a standard?

The context is technical in the IT field. Taking for example the https protocol would you say: The https protocol is candidate to become in the main standard or The https protocol is candidated to ...
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123 views

Are there two verbs with the same past participle?

I'm interested in finding two verbs with the same past participle but different infinitives. Mock example: to feed -> fed to fead -> fed
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4answers
3k views

Is it right to say “phone was rang”?

Recently I saw these two sentences in two different books So after dinner my cell phone was rang and it was Tom. (The Journey of Andrea: Make Sure You Live Your Life to the Fullest Before ...,By ...
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2answers
388 views

“I've eaten, shaved and showered”?

Which one is better? I've eaten, shaved and showered. I've eaten, shaven and showered. The first one sounds more correct to me, but shouldn't we use the past participle shaven for the same reason ...
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1answer
627 views

is/are + past participle vs. have been + past particple

So I am really confused when to use past participle and have been + p.p For example In situations like the ones below Are these dishes washed? Have these dishes been washed? (Washed and ...
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3k views

has grown vs is grown

What is the correct auxiliary in a sentence like this: In the last years the number of some-things is/has grown. ?
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92 views

Proper grammar with ellipsis?

Bear with me, please. Consider this sentence: "He might've turned his head and seen the incident, but I'm not sure." This sounds awkward, but it makes sense, as seen agrees with might have. But ...
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1answer
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The past participle of “split”: “split” or “splitted”?

I have just written a question in the PPCG site, and now that I read it again I have just noticed that I have just written "split" and "splitted" randomly as the past participle of "to split": Can ...
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2answers
2k views

What tense is “I am broken”?

This seems to be some type of present tense, but guides to verb tense only give the following two options: present progressive tense and present perfect tense. Present progressive tense uses a present ...
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509 views

Problems of Use of Participle in Academic Writing: “When considering” VS “When considered”

I have questions about the participle phrase in academic writing which are related to the dangling modifiers of 3 cases. Could you explain me more the appropriate use of sentences with the participle ...
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1answer
628 views

Why do we use forms of “have” with past participles to form the present perfect, as in “I have taken”?

We use has, had, or have with a past participle to form the present perfect. This contrasts with our use of a single verb for the present simple. We do not say “I taken the test,” but instead use the ...
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326 views

Use of past participles

Past participles are used as adjective in English language. But I have found a sentence on the internet. As She was looking at me shocked. I do not know whether this sentence is right or wrong. ...
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Is “have went” gaining common currency in AmE and BrE?

In the following article from English today there is a survey about the usage of the erroneous, but apparently rather commonly used expression “have went” in place of “have gone”: ... several ...
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1answer
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Roast Chicken vs Roasted Chicken [duplicate]

I was reading the "Oxford Word Skills" book when I got a question: Since "roast" itself can act as an adjective (and of course as a verb), is it correct to say either "roasted chicken" or "roast ...
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4answers
826 views

Why there are three different sounds for -ed?

Following this question on the pronunciation of the final -ed. What is the reason why there are three different pronunciations (/ɪd/, /t/ and /d/)? I'm well aware that phonetic shifts exist, I study ...
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904 views

If a word can be both an adjective and a verb, can you still use the past principle as an adjective?

For example, the word "averse" could serve as both a verb and an adjective. Can I still use "aversed" as an adjective? Are "more aversed" and "more averse" the same thing? For another example, are "...
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1answer
798 views

Participial Phrases

Is the sentence below grammatically correct? I repeatedly punched his face until I passed out, my arms sliced a few times by his blade." I know what participial phrases are; I read about them ...
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What is the past simple and past participle of spit? Each online dictionary has different form

Cambridge: past tense and past participle : here is the cambridge link:spat.https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/spit#british-1-1-2 Oxford:spits, spitting, spat, spitted Oxford link :...

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