Questions tagged [past-participle]

Questions about past participle forms of verbs.

3
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2answers
60 views
+50

Omitting the auxiliary 'have' before the past participle

In examples (1) and (2), the verb escaped is the past participle form, and the auxiliary 'have' seems to have been omitted before 'escaped'. Specifically, I think 'having' and 'he has' are omitted in (...
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0answers
13 views

“Testing complete” vs “Testing is completed” [migrated]

Consider these two ways of saying something: Testing complete. Testing is completed. This is just an example. I want to understand any differences between the two constructions “ᴠᴇʀʙɪɴɢ ᴀᴅᴊᴇᴄᴛɪᴠᴇ” ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Past participle adjective usage in documentation registers

Very often when documenting data I am confronted with the following dilemma: Should I use the past tense or the present tense to describe processes by which the data are defined? E.g. I might say “...
1
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1answer
35 views

Could I sometimes indicate completed actions using the passive version of the present tense?

The work is done - The work was done. The action is finished - The action was finished For example, I have just finished my work and say The work is done but when I explain something in the ...
1
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0answers
27 views

How to explain the tenses in these sentences?

So my Japanese student is having trouble understanding why the following tenses are used and I’m not sure how to explain it. My line manager wants the meeting arranged immediately. Why does that ...
1
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1answer
40 views

If the past participle of “say” is “said”, and “lay” is “laid”, why the one of “stay” is not “staid”?

I know about the word "staid". Does the past participle of "stay" is "stayed" to avoid confusion with this word? Or the "staid" past participle existed at some time, but it was supplanted by "stayed",...
1
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0answers
26 views

Past participle of stand

I'm new to this community, I hope the question fits this somewhat. Say we have a sentence: The tree which stands in the garden is beautiful. Now using participle construction this becomes: The ...
1
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2answers
174 views

How do you determine if a pre-modifying past participle is a verb or an adjective?

How do you determine if a past participle--when used as a pre-modifier of a noun--is a verb or an adjective? For example: a. I saw a broken vase. b. I saw a murdered man. I think broken in a....
4
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3answers
119 views

What is the difference between had and got?

Are there any significant differences in uses or meanings between these two words? Between the two example sentences below, does one sentence have a slightly different meaning compared to the other, ...
1
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1answer
67 views

Can “taken” be used without an auxiliary verb? “When taken to this extreme…”

Is it correct to use "taken" without an auxiliary (helping) verb? For example: In some cases, a more powerful racial group justifies the domination and, horribly, even the complete destruction of ...
0
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3answers
100 views

Is something “candidate” or “candidated” to become a standard?

The context is technical in the IT field. Taking for example the https protocol would you say: The https protocol is candidate to become in the main standard or The https protocol is candidated to ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Are there two verbs with the same past participle?

I'm interested in finding two verbs with the same past participle but different infinitives. Mock example: to feed -> fed to fead -> fed
2
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4answers
587 views

Is it right to say “phone was rang”?

Recently I saw these two sentences in two different books So after dinner my cell phone was rang and it was Tom. (The Journey of Andrea: Make Sure You Live Your Life to the Fullest Before ...,By ...
1
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1answer
82 views

“I've eaten, shaved and showered”?

Which one is better? I've eaten, shaved and showered. I've eaten, shaven and showered. The first one sounds more correct to me, but shouldn't we use the past participle "shaven" for the same reason ...
1
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1answer
180 views

is/are + past participle vs. have been + past particple

So I am really confused when to use past participle and have been + p.p For example In situations like the ones below Are these dishes washed? Have these dishes been washed? (Washed and ...
0
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1answer
760 views

has grown vs is grown

What is the correct auxiliary in a sentence like this: In the last years the number of some-things is/has grown. ?
0
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1answer
49 views

Proper grammar with ellipsis?

Bear with me, please. Consider this sentence: "He might've turned his head and seen the incident, but I'm not sure." This sounds awkward, but it makes sense, as seen agrees with might have. But ...
8
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1answer
18k views

The past participle of “split”: “split” or “splitted”?

I have just written a question in the PPCG site, and now that I read it again I have just noticed that I have just written "split" and "splitted" randomly as the past participle of "to split": Can ...
3
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2answers
700 views

What tense is “I am broken”?

This seems to be some type of present tense, but guides to verb tense only give the following two options: present progressive tense and present perfect tense. Present progressive tense uses a present ...
0
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2answers
204 views

Problems of Use of Participle in Academic Writing: “When considering” VS “When considered”

I have questions about the participle phrase in academic writing which are related to the dangling modifiers of 3 cases. Could you explain me more the appropriate use of sentences with the participle ...
0
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1answer
377 views

Why do we use forms of “have” with past participles to form the present perfect, as in “I have taken”?

We use has, had, or have with a past participle to form the present perfect. This contrasts with our use of a single verb for the present simple. We do not say “I taken the test,” but instead use the ...
1
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1answer
285 views

Use of past participles

Past participles are used as adjective in English language. But I have found a sentence on the internet. As She was looking at me shocked. I do not know whether this sentence is right or wrong. ...
6
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4answers
5k views

Is “have went” gaining common currency in AmE and BrE?

In the following article from English today there is a survey about the usage of the erroneous, but apparently rather commonly used expression “have went” in place of “have gone”: ... several ...
2
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1answer
805 views

Roast Chicken vs Roasted Chicken [duplicate]

I was reading the "Oxford Word Skills" book when I got a question: Since "roast" itself can act as an adjective (and of course as a verb), is it correct to say either "roasted chicken" or "roast ...
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3answers
450 views

Why there are three different sounds for -ed?

Following this question on the pronunciation of the final -ed. What is the reason why there are three different pronunciations (/ɪd/, /t/ and /d/)? EDIT: I'm well aware that phonetic shifts exist, ...
1
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1answer
455 views

If a word can be both an adjective and a verb, can you still use the past principle as an adjective?

For example, the word "averse" could serve as both a verb and an adjective. Can I still use "aversed" as an adjective? Are "more aversed" and "more averse" the same thing? For another example, are "...
0
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0answers
72 views

would have ppt for expressing likelihood/certainty about something in the past

I know quite well how to use "would have" + ppt for desired actions which were not possible due to some external causes: "I would have visited you but I forgot the address". However, I often see ...
3
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1answer
586 views

Participial Phrases

Is the sentence below grammatically correct? I repeatedly punched his face until I passed out, my arms sliced a few times by his blade." I know what participial phrases are; I read about them ...
0
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0answers
50 views

Passive or adjective?

I'm an English teacher and a question has been preocupying my mind since my first experience of teaching. Take a look at this sentence: "The door is closed every day at 8:00 What kind of sentence ...
0
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1answer
953 views

What is the past simple and past participle of spit? Each online dictionary has different form

Cambridge: past tense and past participle : here is the cambridge link:spat.https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/spit#british-1-1-2 Oxford:spits, spitting, spat, spitted Oxford link :...
26
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2answers
2k views

Irregular verbs: the history of the suffix “-en” used in past participles

Recently, I've been helping my home students learn the past participles of some of the irregular verbs, in a "new" way. Basically, I show that sometimes the suffix -(e)n is added to the PRESENT stem. ...
0
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1answer
94 views

“We are committed to continually investing in ourselves” or “We are committed to continually invest in ourselves”? [duplicate]

Which is correct? Also why? For some reason the continually is throwing me off here. Thanks.
0
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2answers
111 views

What is the exact difference between “called” and “so-called”? [closed]

Actually, in English to Korean dictionary, both of "called" and "so-called" have the same meaning. In many examples of the dictionary, "so-called" is used as adjective rather than past-particle, i.e.,...
5
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2answers
582 views

“Bereaved” vs. “bereft”

I saw the sentence below, and I think it would sound better after changing "bereaved" to "bereft": Having lost his father in early childhood, he was bereaved of his love and affection. The Oxford ...
3
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3answers
189 views

Outsourced Partner or Outsourcing partner?

I'm not an English native speaker. My lecturer in my university keeps using "outsourced partner" instead of "outsourcing partner", while I saw everyone in internet is more often using "outsourcing ...
0
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1answer
602 views

has me beat vs. has me beaten vs. beats me

An LA Times column titled "A Word, Please: Microsoft unveils top 10 grammar mistakes, but its editing tools aren’t perfect" has this passage: ... Microsoft’s No. 1 most common grammar mistake ...
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0answers
2k views

Have had/has had

Should the following sentence read "In recent years, the rapid development and mass proliferation of artificial intelligence have had various sociopolitical implications" or "In recent years, the ...
3
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2answers
2k views

“It never truly sunk in, …”: Sunk or sank?

I just began reading The Only Grammar Book You’ll Ever Need by Susan Thurman. On the first page of the Introduction chapter, the author wrote “Maybe all that talk in English class about parts of ...
2
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1answer
168 views

What part of speech is “rested” in this sentence? [duplicate]

In the sentence, "I was well rested," is rested an adjective or a past participle? Similarly, in the sentence, "Your room was organized," is organized an adjective or a past participle?
1
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1answer
331 views

Polysemous prefix 'un-'

The prefix 'un-' is polysemous. Its meaning depends on the word class of the root/stem it is being attached to: for verbs the meaning has a "reversible" effect and for adjectives it has a "negated" or ...
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0answers
117 views

Is the structure of “fraught by villainous scoundrels” acceptable?

I'm writing a poem in which certain stanzas are of the form - The skill has been taught extensively It has been taught by aces; The journey is fraught with perils It (is/will be) ...
2
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1answer
345 views

Why does past participle phrase modifies object of a sentence?

I am confused when i read the following sentences. Her cruel sisters had brought expensive new clothes for the party and laughed at her when they saw Cinderella crying , dressed in her plain, dirty ...
0
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0answers
13 views

What is the past participle of the verb to get? [duplicate]

I get often confused with the verb to get in the past tenses. I see gotten, got, etc. Could someone kindly clarify with some few examples? Shall I say: I have got or I have gotten
0
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1answer
447 views

Structure with to infinitive or gerund or past participle

I read a vocabulary book . There is a sentence which makes me confused. " The government had passed a bill outlawing smoking while driving" . I wonder if why the author use "outlawing" here but not ...
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2answers
1k views

So, “The company's meetings are scheduled” means “someone schedules them (regularly)” or “someone is scheduling them (right now)”?

We all know that simple present tense shows Routine Actions such as a habit, a hobby, a daily event, a scheduled event or something that often happens (Source) Eg: I schedule the company's meetings (...
0
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1answer
459 views

Very confused! Past Participles As Adjectives or Passive Voice express a routine or an on-going task

We all know that simple present tense shows Repeated Actions such as a habit, a hobby, a daily event, a scheduled event or something that often happens (Source) Eg: I play tennis. We also know that ...
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3answers
3k views

Past tense verb form vs. linking verb + past tense form

I had the sentence "I haven't read the flashcards I have made these past few days." Someone corrected it with "I haven't read the flashcards I made these past few days" Then someone corrected that ...
21
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5answers
10k views

Is “I’ve boughten many vinyls” correct in its use of “boughten”?

Per Merriam-Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/is-boughten-a-word) boughten is an adjective. According to my non-native-English-speaking friend the sentence "I've boughten many ...
1
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0answers
484 views

Past participle used as an adjective

I found this "blog" where the point I refer to is fully explained. http://englishharmony.com/past-participle-as-adjective/ Since the moment I read it, I've been wondering if It was already ...
9
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3answers
739 views

When can auxiliary “have” for a past participle in a modifier be omitted?

In the 1928 novel The Well of Loneliness, Radclyffe Hall writes: Arrived at the church, she and Wanda would stand looking down between the tall, massive columns of the porch, on a Paris of domes ...