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Questions tagged [parts-of-speech]

The tag has no usage guidance.

118
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19answers
25k views

Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?

Is "women men girls love meet die" a valid sentence? If so, what does it mean? The sentence shows up in academic papers about the "Sausage Machine" for natural language processing. (A google will ...
51
votes
7answers
7k views

Mimsy were the Borogoves - why is “mimsy” an adjective?

I'm reading Lewis Carroll's "Through the Looking-Glass" and I've found a famous poem Jabberwocky: Twas bryllyg, and the slythy toves Did gyre and gymble in the wabe: All mimsy were the ...
35
votes
6answers
91k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”? [duplicate]

Listen to all your fans Name all the states vs Listen to all of  your fans Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or optional, correct or ...
35
votes
6answers
4k views

What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”

The question "Not worth the paper it's printed on" - wrong meaning? got me thinking about what part of speech, or lexical class, the word 'worth' takes? A comment in Which is correct: &...
32
votes
4answers
47k views

How does the phrase “used to” work, grammatically?

It is common to hear people say "used to" to indicate that they did something in the past but no longer do; for example, "I used to play basketball." How would "used to," used in that context, fit ...
27
votes
7answers
122k views

Is “yesterday” a noun, an adjective or an adverb?

Are words like "yesterday" and "tomorrow" considered nouns, adjectives, or even adverbs? I'm getting mixed signals from several references. In a case like "I have an important meeting tomorrow," it ...
25
votes
3answers
4k views

When a single use of a word has more than one word-sense (or part of speech) in the same sentence

Consider the sentence: John used to work for the newspaper that you are reading." (source) Newspaper has several well-known senses. The two that occur here are the sense of the newspaper, as a ...
24
votes
2answers
9k views

What part of speech is “down” in “Put your pencils down”?

I need to know what down in this specific sentence means. I don't know if it is a preposition or an adverb.
22
votes
6answers
8k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
21
votes
5answers
10k views

Is “I’ve boughten many vinyls” correct in its use of “boughten”?

Per Merriam-Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/is-boughten-a-word) boughten is an adjective. According to my non-native-English-speaking friend the sentence "I've boughten many ...
21
votes
3answers
15k views

Word to describe the quality of being optional or mandatory

Something like 'Optionality' or 'Ordinality'? (It's similar in kind to the words "Arity" and "Cardinality") Example: "Fred listed the XXXity of each parameter, noting whether it was optional or ...
17
votes
4answers
14k views

What part of speech is “on” in “on fire”?

A while ago, there was an answer on Jeopardy! along the following lines: In the sentence he was on fire, the word on is this part of speech. The judges ruled that it was a preposition. But I ...
16
votes
3answers
2k views

Why not an s on “speed” in “Ukraine speed to test new-look Germany defence”

This url links to an Australian article (sourced from Reuters) about a football team. The article has the following title: Ukraine speed to test new-look Germany defence I understand that the word ...
16
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the grammatical function of 'Celsius' in “ten degrees Celsius”?

In this sentence: Iron melts at around 770 degrees Celsius, 1,400 degrees Fahrenheit. What is the grammatical function of the words 'Celsius' and 'Fahrenheit' ?
16
votes
12answers
5k views

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few ...
16
votes
4answers
2k views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out of ...
16
votes
2answers
14k views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
15
votes
3answers
4k views

What part of speech is ‘mountains’ in the sentence “I like climbing mountains”?

I'm trying to understand the grammar of this sentence: I like climbing mountains. Here's what I've got so far: "I" is the subject "like" is the verb I believe "climbing" is a participle Maybe "...
15
votes
7answers
7k views

Is “running” a gerund or a participial adjective?

An enlightening experiment Google Books yields only 39 results, and instead asks me if I wanted to say “an enlightening experience”, and eagerly shows an impressive 10,000 results when I click on ...
15
votes
7answers
5k views

Is “so” a pronoun?

Reminded by What is the grammatical function of so in this sentence, something that has always bothered me is that the word "so" can be used as a pronoun: It looks like rain Responding with: No,...
15
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4answers
7k views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
14
votes
10answers
31k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
13
votes
6answers
21k views

How many different parts of speech can the f-word be used as?

In an "interesting" thread of comments we began to look at the word fuck in several different uses. Most of them were interjections and verb uses as would be expected. But, perhaps dialectally, the ...
13
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it true that a word ending in -y is more likely to be an adjective than a noun?

Claim: a word ending in -y is most likely not a noun but an adjective. Don't have my tagged corpus handy to check. Anyone have the stats on Parts-Of-Speech of words ending in y and assuming they don'...
13
votes
4answers
5k views

New Oxford American Dictionary describes “the” as an adjective

When I look at the definition given from the Mac OS X Dictionary (I have set American English as interface language, and the dictionary used is then the New Oxford American Dictionary), I read: the ...
13
votes
8answers
1k views

“Cry foul” - is foul a noun?

Is the the word "foul" in the saying "cry foul" a noun, an adjective or an adverb? I had a disagreement with my teacher, where I think it's a noun. As in screaming "Foul!", saying that the action is ...
13
votes
5answers
8k views

If a word has two different meanings, is it two different words or one word with different meanings?

My brother and sister-in-law are arguing about whether "train" meaning locomotive and "train" meaning teach constitutes one word with two different meanings or if it's two different words. I said ...
12
votes
9answers
4k views

Is “times” really a plural noun?

In the question What part of speech are "plus", "times", and "minus", we discover that plus is a preposition, and are left to assume that so is times, in phrases such as "...
12
votes
7answers
3k views

What part of speech is “telling” in “that would be telling”?

In the phrase "that would be telling", what is the word "telling"? I think it would be either an adjective or a verb, but which is it? Neither seems to be obviously wrong. I think the former would ...
12
votes
1answer
50k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

What part of speech is 'say' ? If I were, say, to use it?

I can use 'say' as a noun : (Chicago Tribune 2007) Aflac Insurance - the first U.S. company to voluntarily offer its shareholders a say on pay. OED (Presumably it is an uncountable noun and the ...
11
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5answers
6k views

What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?

As a spin-off from this comment: If a human exclaims something like "ouch!", I believe it's considered an interjection. But if a pig exclaims "oink!", what is the part of speech? And if a bell goes ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
11
votes
1answer
7k views

What form of verb is “thank” in “thank you”?

Is the word thank in Thank you! a verb? If not, what part of speech is it then? If it is a verb, is it in the imperative mood? I'm asking because I've seen someone write Do thank you! which sounds ...
11
votes
4answers
5k views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The knight’s ...
10
votes
10answers
37k views

What word can fulfill the most parts of speech?

I know there are several parts of speech: Noun Verb Pronoun Adjective Adverb Preposition Conjunction Interjection There might be others as well. Sometimes a word, depending on how it is used, can ...
10
votes
5answers
7k views

Parts of speech and functions: “Bob made a book collector happy the other day”

Having been bamboozled by various questions and answers on this site, I'd like to know what are the parts of speech (POS) and grammatical functions of the words and phrases in the following sentence: ...
10
votes
4answers
3k views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a target ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be a ...
9
votes
5answers
968 views

Cooking apples and cleaning ladies

Consider the following sentences: Cooking is my favourite activity. Cooking apples are essential for this recipe. Cooking functions in the first sentence as a gerund. How does it function in the ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

What part of speech is “methinks”?

Dictionaries call this word a verb, but it doesn't seem to behave like any other verb in the English language. Another question on this site calls it a “conjoined pronoun-verb combination”, which ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the word for using one part of speech where another would be more grammatical?

There's a Greek word that means using the wrong part of speech somewhere in a sentence, as in: I don't know the who or the how or the when. Where "who", "how", and "when" are being used for nouns. ...
8
votes
4answers
39k views

Part of speech for “please” followed by a verb

I know that "please" can be many different parts of speech; interjection, an adverb, or a verb, depending on how it's used. I'm looking specifically to find out what part of speech "please" is when ...
8
votes
4answers
8k views

Adverbial form of “timely”

The following sentence seems incorrect to me, because the adjective timely is being used as an adverb: Payments not received timely will be returned and additional interest will be due. That ...
8
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3answers
1k views

The verb form of “Is entered in the race”

[I'm not much of an expert in English usage, just an armchair boffin, so I hope I'm not out of line asking what may be a dumb question, to the regulars here...] I am trying to figure out the form of ...
8
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4answers
5k views

More on 'who should she see': what part of speech is 'should' in this phrase?

Prompted by What does 'should' mean in this sentence?, instead of asking what it means, I'm interested in what part of speech it is. The sentence is: She walked through the forest, and who should ...
8
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5answers
3k views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does Pinker classify these words as prepositions in *The Sense of Style*?

In his recent book, The Sense of Style, Steven Pinker explains permissible uses of commas and writes this sentence And when the writer pinpoints the coherence relation he has in mind with an ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Do all words have a part of speech?

Do all words have a part of speech? The closest counterexample I can think of is yes. The dictionary says its supposed to be an adverb but it doesn't really strike me as something that modifies a ...
8
votes
2answers
844 views

How did 'mad' come to be a determiner?

There's a group of words — I think they're called determiners — used to indicate number in some way... like many, few, most, etc. During a linguistics class my professor said this was a closed group ...