Questions tagged [parts-of-speech]

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How do you determine if a pre-modifying past participle is a verb or an adjective?

How do you determine if a past participle--when used as a pre-modifier of a noun--is a verb or an adjective? For example: a. I saw a broken vase. b. I saw a murdered man. I think broken in a....
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0answers
38 views

What part of speech is 'Hearing' in these sentences?

"Hearing the voice, the boy woke up" "The boy woke up hearing the voice" What is 'hearing' in these sentences?
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1answer
30 views

Give/insert a pronoun [closed]

I have come across a question in a book. Please explain the solution. The statement is as follows: The city_________ is very large. (Give a pronoun).
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1answer
43 views

What is the noun form of `Forbid` [closed]

Is there any noun form of the verb Forbid? The meaning will be same as Prohibition. Update: As some suggestions are coming up like: Ban, Prohibition etc; my question is ban and prohibition seem a ...
2
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0answers
27 views

What part of speech is 'put' in the expression 'stay put'?

A previous question asked the same of 'warm' in 'stay warm' but the single answer was not very satisfying to me and also 'put' is not the same as 'warm' even if, as the answer suggests, 'you' is ...
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0answers
49 views

from high enough

because he hadn’t jumped off from high enough. I wonder whether high in the sentence is an adjective? or a noun? As far as I know, a preposition should be followed by a noun (-- group).
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1answer
29 views

What these parts of speech symbols mean in this word list [closed]

This word list has these strange symbols for parts of speech which I can't find documentation on. Wondering if one could list out what they mean. a: the (?) v: be (verb) c: and (conjunction) i: of (?)...
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2answers
36 views

What adjectives can be used as adverbs? [duplicate]

Are the following sentences acceptable to native speakers? I want it so bad. The children grew up happy and healthy. Jimmy works hard. He followed her quick. What adjectives can be used as adverbs? ...
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0answers
17 views

What does “self temporarily” mean? [migrated]

This is the whole paragraph I’m having trouble with: His uncle backhanded him so hard across his left cheek that Isaac’s sense of self temporarily broke upon the ground on which his body fell. ...
1
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1answer
42 views

What part-of-speech is “all” in these sentences?

These different dictionarys don't agree about what part-of-speech "all" is when it goes between subject and verb: For Cambridge dictionary is an adverb The kids all go to school on the same bus. ...
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0answers
13 views

atom state or atomic state: compound nouns

Consider the sentence X is derived from the atom state. My confusion is about the use of the word atom in front of state. Is this form ok, or is the correct form rather atomic state? Perhaps both are ...
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0answers
46 views

“Too short a time” or “Too short of a time”? [duplicate]

What is the correct phrase to be used among these two: Too short a time Or Too short of a time Which one is correct for daily English usage?
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3answers
11k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
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2answers
76 views

What part of speech is “mountain” in the sentence “Avalanches are dangerous to mountain climbers.”? [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand the grammar of this sentence: Avalanches are dangerous to mountain climbers. What part of speech is the word mountain?
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1answer
41 views

Can 'smart home' and similar phrases be adjectives if followed by a noun, or do they become complements? [closed]

I'm having some confusion here as I've been tasked with checking that some texts fit a style guide for work, and it requires that two adjectives directly preceding a noun be hyphenated, e.g. 'well-...
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2answers
101 views

In “You did me wrong”, is “wrong” an adverb or some other part of speech instead?

Consider: You did me wrong. In that sentence, is wrong an adverb or some other part of speech? I don’t understand the syntactic construction being used here.
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1answer
47 views

Is “minus your points” a valid phrase?

Suppose that a teacher says I will minus your points if you cheat. To mean "I will deduct your points." Here, minus is apparently used as a verb. Checking out the dictionaries, it can be seen that ...
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6answers
8k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
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1answer
40 views

“Why is it that…” relative clause? [closed]

It would be great if someone could explain this sentence structure to me: "Why is it that you don't like me?" I don't understand how all of the components come together. What is the link between it ...
3
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1answer
275 views

What part of speech is the word “entire” in “over the little garden field entire”?

The sentence is: "After a while she got up from where she was and went over the little garden field entire." A quote from Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. I want to know if the ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Is there a specific term to refer to a word associated with specific part of speech?

I'm looking for a term I can use to refer to words tagged with a specific part of speech. Let's say the word run may be used as a verb and as a noun. So, run (n) and run (v) are ... of word run. Is ...
3
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1answer
240 views

A few miles into the town — verbless clause, or adverbial phrase?

A few miles into the town, I saw a beautiful building that was now abandoned. I don't know if "a few miles into the town" is a verbless clause like this (Being) a few miles into the town, I saw a ...
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2answers
428 views

What is the classification of the words such as “group of”, “bundle of”, “number of” and also the right form of verb after using this words?

First example: A bundle of roses is the most beautiful thing one can have in the morning. A bundle of roses are the most beautiful thing ... Second example: The number of books are ...
3
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1answer
80 views

Category of the First Term in the Partitive Construction

Are the words in bold type in the following sentences determiners? One of the books was written by X I want two of those 8 percent of the population has X I ate some of that cake In a treatise ...
3
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1answer
281 views

Like as a preposition and prepositional phrase sub categorization rules

I'm trying to figure out how the sentence "My hands are shaking like crazy," breaks down into lexical categories. I know "like" can function as a preposition, meaning "similar to", but I'm not sure if ...
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1answer
38 views

How to identify a phrasal verb + object from a verb + prepositional phrase

In sentences with the combination “verb + preposition + noun phrase” is there a procedure to identify whether it is a phrasal verb + object or a verb + prepositional phrase? or does it solely depend ...
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1answer
27 views

Adverb or something “else”?

What exactly is the functionality of else (as in "something else")? Does it always modify an action? Does it also sometimes qualify a noun? Most common dictionaries seem content with defining ...
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5answers
983 views

What is the gram­mat­i­cal term for “‑ed” words like these?

In English we say things like: a cal­i­brated de­vice a dis­trib­uted prod­uct a founded com­pany a de­stroyed house Those ‑ed words there all sig­nify that some verb (here re­spec­tively cal­i­...
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2answers
8k views

The difference between “parts of speech”, “word classes”, “word categories”?

As a foreign language speaker, I find it hard to distinguish these terms. I've searched on the net; on wikipedia, on grammar.about.com, and some other pages, yet still having difficulties. One just ...
2
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1answer
48 views

How would pretty be classified in this sentence [duplicate]

The sentence is "You look pretty tonight". I believe that pretty would be an adjective as it's referring to "You". However in the sentence "You look pretty gorgeous tonight" I believe that pretty ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Words with multiple parts of speech

What is it called when a word can serve more than one part of speech? 'Aggregate', for example, can be used as a Noun, an Adjective, or a Verb.
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100 views

What part of speech is “handsome” in the following sentence [closed]

What part of speech is handsome in the sentence: The bridegroom looked so handsome.
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1answer
58 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
2
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1answer
195 views

Can I use 'quiet' as a verb in BrE?

Can I use the word 'quiet' as a verb in BrE (as opposed to N. American)? If I can, how is it conjugated? The phrase I am looking to write is, "I wish to quiet my mind". Should it be 'quieten'? That ...
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2answers
35 views

What will be the best word in this situation? [closed]

He knew it was a very ___ operation but he was determined to carry it out. Available options are: a) Difficult b) Dangerous c) Risky d) Troublesome It seems that all the options are valid. Could ...
2
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1answer
93 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...
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2answers
47 views

Does a ver­bal noun turn back into a verb when mod­ified by an ad­verb? [duplicate]

Here singing is a noun: I like singing. But what about here? I like singing loudly. Loudly is still an ad­verb, right? But singing is still be­hav­ing like a noun, right? So which is it, a noun ...
2
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2answers
113 views

“To hunt is my favorite pastime.” What part of speech is “to hunt” in this sentence?

The function of infinitives seems to be up for grabs at the last post I commented at. I either need to be schooled or my interlocutors do. May your answers bring some clarity. These are your choices....
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1answer
1k views

Building a phrase structure of “On the weekend …”

I'm reading Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing, and I'm doing one of the early exercises, trying to work out some of the language infliction about the word 'fun'. On the ...
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1answer
41 views

What is a phrase like “in my house” called?

What is the grammatical name and function of the clause in bold: They were in my house when the thieves broke in.
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1answer
31 views

What does “by all constitutional means” mean in this context?

This is an extract from a speech Churchill made in 1947. Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or ...
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2answers
246 views

“Equals” - a verb or not?

I was checking out the usage of the word "equal" as a verb on the Merriam-Webster website. Under the "Recent Examples on the Web: Verb" section, I stumbled upon this peculiar quotation: "That map ...
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2answers
208 views

How is “iff” different from “if”

So I just discovered iff thinking it was a typo. But after looking it up and reading other answers on here it is a valid contraction of words if and only if. Much like XOR in a mathematical domain. ...
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4answers
1k views

Can “Christ­mas” be used as an ad­jec­tive in “Christ­mas-col­ored”?

I was just won­der­ing whether I can write: Christ­mas-col­ored stock­ings I know that Christ­mas can be a mod­i­fier as in Christ­mas gift, but can it be used as an ad­jec­tive in Christ­mas-col­...
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12answers
5k views

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few ...
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1answer
357 views

Are there any word types in English that don't fall into one of these 5 functional categories?

(And I suppose the logical follow-up question is - are there any functions words take that are not included in these 5 categories?) 1) deliver specific content/ meaning adjective adverb noun verb ...
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2answers
111 views

What is the part of speech is “the door” in the sentence below?

Grammatically speaking what is "the door" in the following sentence? To answer the door, she pulled it open. Is it a modifier?
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1answer
102 views

What part of speech does “fledgling” have in the following sentence?

"Murray has years of experience in family practice, but he is just a fledgling in surgery." In the above sentence, is fledgling a noun or an adjective? Or, is it both? Is that why both noun and ...
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2answers
37 views

“Including” disambiguation [closed]

This sentence is from Wikipedia: A website is a collection of related web pages, including multimedia content, typically identified with a common name, and published on at least one web server. Is ...
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3answers
5k views

What part of speech is “why” in the following example?

In the sentence "Why is this here?", is "why" an adverb? What part of speech is "why?" I think it modifies the verb "is", so I think it is an adverb.