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Questions tagged [particles]

The tag has no usage guidance.

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1answer
28 views

differentiate `to+verb` from `verb` in the context of a list

He gives wisdom and knowledge to enable his children to understand and see the invisible. He gives wisdom and knowledge to enable his children to understand and to see the invisible. Sometimes I ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Why does “writes” take “to” but “reads” not take “to”? [closed]

I hope this is the right sub, but I was wondering what the technical difference is between words such as "write", which take the particle "to" when involved with a grammatical object, and "read", ...
10
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4answers
604 views

In “go to sleep”, is “to” a particle or a preposition?

In the phrase go to sleep, I've always thought of sleep as a noun by analysis with go to school, which would make to a preposition. However, sleep could possibly be interpreted as a verb, which would ...
3
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2answers
724 views

Why do we say “been to” instead of “been in”?

Why is the particle "to" sometimes used in sentences with been? For example, the following sentences are grammatically correct Dad is in the garden. A: “Where's Dad?” B: ”He's in the garden” A: “...
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0answers
25 views

Use of with/and to show addition

If I want to add an idea to another, should I use "with" or "and"? For example: Purchase and Sale Agreement with Assignment of Quotas? or Purchase and Sale Agreement and Assignment of ...
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3answers
4k views

Is the verb “Go” always followed by “to” when talking about a place/location?

Other than the phrase Go home. I can't find other uses of go without to when talking about a specific destination/physical place. I am going to California. She went to Milan. The other ...
1
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3answers
407 views

When should I add “to” before an infinitive in a parallelism sentence?

Here is a sentence I wrote: All he can do, as it turns out, is to stay by her side, take her to wherever he goes and hope someday she will wake up. I added to ahead of take... in the first place, ...
-1
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1answer
773 views

to understand something “under”/“by” something

Is the following correct: The pieces are based on the concept of imperfect reconstruction. By imperfect reconstruction, I understand a strategy that produces repetitions which ... The dictionaries ...
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1answer
431 views

Storm off vs storm out

Is there any difference between these two? Can I say: He had a row and stormed off/out?
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5answers
159 views

“What would I not exact from you…?”

The meaning of the phrase in bold is incomprehensible to me. Could someone please explain or paraphrase the sentence for me? CAESAR. Vengeance! Vengeance!! Oh, if I could stoop to vengeance, what ...
1
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2answers
751 views

Can someone explain the ambiguity in the following sentence? “ We decided on the boat.” [closed]

In one interpretation, on the boat is a prepositional phrase telling the location of the decision. Under the other, decided on is a two-part verb with the meaning "chose". But there is no ...
3
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2answers
306 views

What is the grammatical construction behind the word “climbing” in the phrase “climbing wall” or the word “running” in the phrase “running” shoes?

I am curious about the grammar behind the word "climbing" in the phrase "climbing wall" (or the word "running" in the phrase "running shoes," etc). I first thought it was an adjective describing the ...
0
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1answer
365 views

What do the particles mean in 'believe of, on, to something'?

Foreword: The use of 'believe of' in this comment, motivated this question. 2. intr. With in, †of (rare), †on, †to (rare). To have confidence in the truth or accuracy of (a statement, doctrine, ...
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2answers
31k views

In writing and speaking, which one can I use? have took or taken [closed]

Which one is correct? I have took the class or I have taken the class? Would it be ok it I use I have took in spoken language?
3
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1answer
4k views

“I let him do it” and “I allow him to do it”, why exactly does one require 'to'?

I let him do it. and I allow him to do it. Why does the latter require to? What are the "rules" of using to with an infinitive? When is it necessary?
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2answers
138 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
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3answers
1k views

Particle or preposition?

I'm studying Spanish and I have some questions about the grammatical parallels in English. Le gustan cocinar y hornear. He likes to cook and (to) bake. When an infinitive is used in Spanish, ...
0
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1answer
92 views

“How to *verb* this thing *another verb*…” vs. “How to *verb* this thing TO *another verb*…”?

Which one from the following two variants is the correct one? How to make this thing to work...? How to make this thing work...? I'm not an English speaker, but for me, the first variant sounds good ...
3
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1answer
104 views

“I can't remember things as I used” — why not “as I used to”?

There's a line in Alice in Wonderland: I can't remember things as I used—and I don't keep the same size for ten minutes together! I wonder why the 'to' has been omitted from the verb 'used to'. ...
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2answers
147 views

What is the second “to” in “to take this opportunity to foreground poetry”?

That’s why it’s particularly appropriate for us to take this opportunity to foreground poetry as an aural experience. — Source Is this "to" the same as "something to say?" P.S.: Isn't this ...
1
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2answers
227 views

What is the function of this “to” here?

Old people did not know enough once, perchance, to fetch fresh fuel to keep the fire a-going; new people put a little dry wood under a pot, and are whirled round the globe with the speed of birds, in ...
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1answer
2k views

“Do you still want me to do X” vs. “do you still want that I do X”

Which is correct? Do you still want me to do the project for you? Do you still want that I do the project for you?
2
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1answer
564 views

Is the second “to” grammatical in “I plan to help build and then to start”?

I wrote this sentence: I plan to help build a strategic vision for Arabic digital content and then to start implementing that vision. I want to produce value-added information in a specific context ...
6
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1answer
16k views

What's the difference between “a year”, “per year” and “out of a year”?

Suppose I want to say that I'm at sea seven months out of twelve. (Just an example.) I think I can say "I'm at sea 7 months a year" or "I'm at sea 7 months per year" or "I'm at sea 7 ...
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2answers
99 views

Is there any semantic difference to have a particle after transitive verb?

“There was a time when I supposed my job was to pass on the teaching of the Church.” (The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life) The example has the phrasal verb, pass on, and its object (the teaching ...
2
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3answers
2k views

give a lift to or without “to”?

Reading a text I have seen the following: A man and two girls he gave a lift to. But doesn't this mean that I can say "give a lift to"? What about this: I gave my friend a lift. I gave a ...
7
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2answers
915 views

“put X down to” vs. “put down X to”: subjects of verbs with two particles

I expect I would have to put down many coats to do the job. (SOURCE) One factor to distinguish phrasal verbs from prepositional verbs is particle movement. Phrasal verbs can place the particle before ...
2
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2answers
163 views

“Down” in “hung down the front…”

"A bush grew out of the gutter and hung down the front of the house." Could anybody please explain where in the above sentence 'down' belongs? It could belong to 'hang' a bit like a phrasal verb, or ...
4
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4answers
697 views

The verb “to get” + particle …?

In the phrase "to get all crazy" am I correct when I say that the "all crazy" is a particle phrase? Example: I'm up for tonight's party. I'm going to get all crazy.
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3answers
4k views

Do I need to add “to” in every clause in this sentence?

Working in the field helps us to learn how to apply theories to solve real-world problems, to apply […], and to […]. Are the "to" after each comma necessary?
1
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0answers
110 views

Is it correct to say “John helps you talk with people”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but English is not my first language. For me it ...
5
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2answers
10k views

“To enable him to escape” vs. “to enable him escape”

I have been coming across this kind of sentence more and more: She gave him a key to enable him to escape capture. She gave him a key to enable him escape capture. Which sentence is correct? My ...
81
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10answers
358k views

What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”?

What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? For example: Please, help me to understand this. or: Please, help me understand this.