Questions tagged [participles]

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb or verb phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb.

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44
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3answers
313k views

What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?

What is the difference between a gerund and a participle?
2
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2answers
2k views

Order of participial adjective

I'm proof-reading a thesis by one of my friends and there's some recurring construct which I always mark as false but I'd like to check with you. In the comments I was told that the example I ...
20
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7answers
8k views

When can the -ing form of a verb be placed before a noun?

My native-speaker's grammatical intuition tells me that: There is a sleeping man under the tree. is fine but There is a fishing man by the river bank. is wrong. Why? I've thought about this ...
17
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12answers
7k views

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few possible ...
6
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4answers
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Past participle of a verb created from an acronym

Standard GPL would require that those applications be GPL'd (or compatible licensing), whereas LGPL requires only the library's source to be made available. Is the use of words like GPL'd common to ...
6
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1answer
19k views

Comma before adverbial participial phrases (reduced adverbial phrases) and participial prepositions

Another tricky comma question that has recently popped up in my line work that I have not been able to resolve to my satisfaction. Apologies it's a bit long, but all parts are related and additional ...
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0answers
773 views

How can you tell when a participle is being used as an adjective? [duplicate]

How can you tell when a participle is being used as an adjective? I feel completely lost trying to guess. Just as a completely arbitrary example For every dedicated scientist patiently recording ...
30
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2answers
6k views

What is the name for the process which turned “iced cream” into “ice cream”?

There are several words (mostly related to food) which are shortenings of their historical forms. For example, the cold treat ice cream was originally known as iced cream in the 1680s. The -ed ending ...
3
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5answers
230 views

“I hate Jill singing those songs.” = “I hate Jill when she is singing those songs.”?

Can the sentence I hate Jill singing those songs. mean I hate Jill when she is singing those songs. Or does it mean something else?
5
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1answer
4k views

Looking forward to follow vs. following [duplicate]

I was reading this today: We look forward to following your progress. Am I correct in thinking that it is missing a be or that -ing should be removed? So We look forward to be following your ...
4
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4answers
938 views

Is this use of present participle grammatically correct?

We are a Zhongguancun-based English training school looking for native English speakers from the US and Canada. If you are interested in this position. Please send your CV and photo to [email address]....
4
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1answer
2k views

Is the past participle becoming obsolete? (I have went)

I noticed someone saying "I have went" about a month ago and it jarred me. Then I heard it again, and again, so I started paying attention. I noticed that the first couple of people I heard say this ...
15
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8answers
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“What I'm doing is watching TV.” — Why does it have to be the gerund-participle ('watching')?

What I do is watch TV. What I did was watch TV. What I had done was watch TV. ... But, What I am doing is watching TV. The only possible form of watch in the last sentence is ...
7
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2answers
1k views

Participial clause?

On ELL a user has asked how to parse the emphasized -ing form in this sentence from Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone: Harry swung at it with the bat to stop it from breaking his nose, and ...
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8answers
14k views

“Visualized” equivalent adjective for audio

Are there such words as "audiolized" or "audibilized"? EDIT: Merriam-Webster has the word Audibilized indexed with no definition! What I was trying to achieve was to say that something is an ...
4
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3answers
12k views

Advanced rules for shortening relative clauses with a participle?

Once again, a problem encountered while marking German pupils' exams. We teach them the following rules: A present participle can be used to shorten an active relative clause: The boy who ...
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1answer
203 views

Can a present participle follow a subject?

Which is correct, and why? some days we went on adventures — him maneuvering our scooter, me resting my chin … or some days we went on adventures — he maneuvering our scooter, I resting my chin ...
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1answer
74 views

Possessive adjective or just “it”? [duplicate]

I'm providing the following sentences as representatives of other similar instances. The survival of a TV channel depends on it attracting as many viewers as possible. The survival of a TV ...
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2answers
1k views

Is “reserved” an adjective or verb in this example? [closed]

I need an answer about this sentence please: We had a reserved seat. Reserved in this sentence is a verb. I read that in a morphology book. My question is: how does this become a verb? I thought ...
1
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1answer
185 views

participle phrase or to-infinitive phrase

In response to the long-term measures recommended by the School Board, the then Principal initiated the Pledge Day on “Clean LA", to encourage all schools to make the “Clean LA” commitment on that ...
0
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3answers
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When is “loved” a past participle and when is it simple past?

Some one asked this question: He is loved. This is something that I've always kind of wondered. In a sentence like this, is loved a verb or an adjective? Can it be considered either? The simple ...
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10answers
25k views

Can anyone give me a grammatical explanation as to why “that being said” is proper English?

A certain pedant is claiming that beginning a sentence with "That being said" is grammatically incorrect owing to the apparent logical contradiction in claiming that something in the past (e.g. the ...
11
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3answers
4k views

Why do non-native English speakers get the present participle wrong?

I see people saying things like this: With a new infusion of cash it allows to make the film. ...instead of... With a new infusion of cash it allows making the film. I can't find a specific ...
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18answers
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What is the word meaning “going on and on for miles and miles”?

Edit: I was walking down an intolerably long sidewalk one day, and every time a mounted another hill, I saw more of it seeming to stretch out before me. It got me to thinking: is there a word for "...
4
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3answers
652 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. [past ...
3
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1answer
424 views

with/without + pronoun (me vs. my) + gerund-participial phrase

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 461) has this section: (f) Subject of clausal complement of with/without Pronouns in this position normally appear in accusative case: [16] i We ...
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2answers
1k views

Gerund vs Present Participle: “I was thinking about eating the apple.”

A quick question that has popped up from talking with my German pen-pal. In the sentence: I was thinking about eating the apple. Is eating there a gerund or a present participle? If it is just: ...
10
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6answers
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“Poison” is to “poisoned” as “venom” is to what?

As the title says, poison is to poisoned as venom is to what? I tried looking up venomed but it means something different. Is there such a word?
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1answer
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What is this ‘-ing’ structure?

Consider the following sentence: The Bactrian camel is well adapted to the extreme climate of its native Mongolia, having thick fur and underwool that keep it warm in winter and also insulate ...
6
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5answers
17k views

“Sour cream” versus “soured cream”

Does anyone besides my husband insist on adding an -ed to sour cream? Etymonline dates "sour cream" to 1855, but has no mention of "soured", so I don't think this is analogous to "iced tea" or "ice ...
0
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1answer
1k views

“The cake was baked.” Is “baked” a past participle or predicate adjective? [duplicate]

The cake was baked. Is the word baked considered a predicate adjective? Would the word baked also be a past participle written in passive voice? I am just trying to figure this out.
0
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1answer
198 views

Which clauses with phrases

Can which clause modify participle phrases? Which clause is usually used for summarizing or explaining the clause before it. 1 His wife was stunning, which was always his pride. 2 I left the ...
11
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5answers
5k views

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring? [duplicate]

In Katy Per­ry’s song “Roar”, she says this at the end of the cho­rus: You’re gonna hear me roar Why did she use the bare in­fini­tive form of the verb roar here in­stead of that ver­b’s ‑ing form?...
4
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1answer
9k views

Is it, “otherwise directed” vs. “directed otherwise”?

I've seen conflicting usage of the two phrases, and I wonder which one is grammatically correct and why? Following are example sentence: Do something unless directed otherwise. Do something unless ...
3
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1answer
14k views

Past participle of “fly” [closed]

In a song by Coldplay, Paradise, I found the sentence Away she flied. I'm Italian, and I was not sure that flied could be a form of the verb fly or some other word unknown to me. I looked it up in the ...
2
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2answers
841 views

What is the correct form of “advance” in the sentence: “My advance search”?

Which form is correct? My advance search. My advanced search. I ask this in comparison to "simple" that does not have a 'ed' form. My simple search.
2
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2answers
44k views

'Relates to' vs. 'Is Related to'

Does the choice between passive/active voice make any difference in the examples below? My question relates to your earlier work. My question is related to you earlier work. Nerve cells relate to one ...
2
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2answers
502 views

Dangling Participial Phrase [closed]

Here’s the original: The veterinarian was caught off guard when, regaining consciousness, we were again attacked by the cat. My rewrite of this sentence is either: The veterinarian was caught ...
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3answers
342 views

Postmodification using participle: Is it grammatical?

I am a Japanese teacher of English who is making a teaching material for my students. I would like to know whether the following usage would be totally accepted in school grammar. To put my question ...
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1answer
586 views

Word order of participial modifiers and proper nouns

This is a follow-up to this earlier question. I want to say that I met a person and they were drunk at the time. Which should I use: I saw intoxicated John. I saw the intoxicated John. I saw John ...
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2answers
2k views

Is that an adverbial participle? Should there be a comma?

I found the following sentence: In part of my spare time, I work on fun projects. I am not sure as to whether there should be a comma. If it is there, then this obeys some rules, for example on ...
0
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0answers
111 views

'watch her run' vs 'watch her running' [duplicate]

QUESTION 1 I'm trying to figure out the seemingly subtle difference(s) between a sentence modified by a bare infinitive and one modified by a participle phrase. What do you get out of these: I ...