Questions tagged [parsing]

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55 views

What is the noun and verb in this sentence?

A student asked me this question and I have no clue... In seconds the only evidence that the rats were there at all were the restless lumps under the man's clothes, forever sliding from place to ...
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1answer
43 views

What is “in the context of others…” in this quote? [closed]

The quote in question: the use of self-directed actions so as to choose goals and to select, enact, and sustain actions across time toward those goals usually in the context of others often ...
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3answers
68 views

Omission of “there is” in a clause

Is this an omission (ellipsis)? What is this omission called in linguistics? What has changed in the interim, to my knowledge, is a huge explosion of self- and mutual-admiration among those who ...
0
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1answer
35 views

How to parse this NP containing the structure “help somebody to do something”?

I'm trying to analyze this long noun phrase (NP) syntactically: The assertion that an understanding of human nature in the light of evolutionary theory can help us to identify the means by ...
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2answers
53 views

No travel advised

I certainly understand what "no travel advised" means (context is a map on road conditions), but I'm curious about the emphasis. In my mind I can parse the sentence in two ways: No (travel advised) (...
0
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1answer
69 views

How to parse “which was especially humiliating because everyone was talking about it the next morning”?

Cara’s mother berated her in front of the entire basketball team, which was especially humiliating because everyone was talking about it the next morning. Is the relative clause ‘which was ...
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2answers
43 views

What part of speech is 'stumble' in this sentence?

I saw this sentence somewhere: 'This episode sees the heroine stumble upon a body.'. I know 'stumble' is a verb, but which part of the verb is being used here? I don't think I really know how to ...
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1answer
78 views

Please parse the phrase “time is of the essence”

Working many years in the legal field, I've seen the phrase, "time is of the essence," many times; I fully understand its meaning. What has always bothered me, though, is that the phrase doesn't seem ...
3
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1answer
250 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
2
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1answer
123 views

Romeo and Juliet “Which then most sought where most might not be found” [closed]

In the following excerpt from Romeo and Juliet, what do the words "which" and "most" refer to? Does the relative clause have a main verb at all? “I, measuring his affections by my own, which then ...
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5answers
283 views

Parsing an English to Math expression question, is this ambiguous?

I'm an instructor of a College Algebra course. The computer gave the following question, which I saw as ambiguous: Computer question: Write the corresponding algebraic expression or equation for ...
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0answers
50 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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0answers
52 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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2answers
199 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
2
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1answer
63 views

CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
2
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1answer
76 views

Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
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2answers
103 views

Indirect complement or postmodifier in NP

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? ...
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2answers
55 views

Is “the better” a noun phrase in this sentence? How to parse this sentence?

A sentence from this site reads ungrammatical. On the sweet side, don’t pass up the walnut coffee cake, which is served warm, the better to soak up the bourbon-caramel glaze. Is the better a noun ...
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1answer
58 views

Function of fractions in NPs + form of subsequent verb

I have two questions about the clause two thirds of the book deals with WWII: i) how do we analyse the subject of this clause from a syntactic point of view? I'd analyse it as a NP, with the ...
2
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1answer
158 views

X-bar tree for a sentence

Those talents, as they make a part of his fortune, so do they likewise of that of the society to which he belongs. (Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations) The structure of the sentence above from Adam ...
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1answer
456 views

Identifying the main clause and subordinate clauses

I’m preparing for my exam and in one of the practice questions i have to identify the main clause, subordinate clause/s and the subject,predicate and/or adverbials. the sentence is: "The Mausoleum ...
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1answer
49 views

Multiple relative clauses within subject?

I'm wondering what is the actual subject in this sentence: "One of the countries she has visited that I have not is Canada." To me, everything up until 'is' seems like the subject, but I can't find ...
2
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3answers
107 views

“The men at the shop, two of whom John knows, are helpful.” Is the relative clause restrictive or nonrestrictive?

The men at the shop, two of whom John knows, are helpful. Is the relative clause nonrestrictive or restrictive? Or ambiguous? (For written English) (1) If it is nonrestrictive, the interpretation ...
2
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1answer
108 views

What do introductory non-finite clauses modify?

I posted the following question in Linguistics Stack Exchange, but since I'm asking about English grammar, I'm thinking that this is a better forum for it. The question: The introductory non-finite ...
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0answers
153 views

Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
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2answers
50 views

How do I parse the phrase “it stands to reason”?

In the phrase "it stands to reason that...", is reason a verb or a noun? If it is a verb, it is subordinate to the verb stands, which is being used metaphorically: it is sound/stable for one to ...
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0answers
75 views

How do you parse comparison structures?

How do you parse structures that make a comparison – specifically as ... as and more/-er ... than? Example 1: He is as cute as an angel – here I would analyse as cute as an angel as an AdjP ...
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2answers
66 views

What are the rules for parsing negation before “all”, “any”, and “every” in English? [duplicate]

My question is about how a negated "all", "any", and "every" statements are usually and correctly understood in English. I have just realized an apparent parsing ambiguity in all such statements (i.e.,...
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2answers
158 views

How do you parse Trump's Tweet?

Trump recently tweeted: ...peace treaty with Israel. We have taken Jerusalem, the toughest part of the negotiation, off the table, but Israel, for that, would have had to pay more. But with the ...
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4answers
5k views

Grammar of 'no matter what'

I am struggling to parse no matter what. (There are a couple questions on the site about the phrase no matter what but they revolve around how to use it.) Is matter here a verb? Is it a noun? If it ...
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0answers
32 views

The yellow big dog [duplicate]

Consider the phrases: "The big yellow dog". "The yellow big dog". "The big little dog". "The red yellow dog". Only the first sounds natural. What rules of grammar say that size must come before ...
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12answers
6k views

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few ...
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1answer
73 views

English Morpho-Syntactic Parsing (Shakespeare)

Could anybody give me a hand with the morpho-syntactic parsing of the following lines from Shakespeare? From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty’s rose might never die, ...
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1answer
404 views

Help me parse this sentence

I and my friend have started examining sentences to recognise parts of speech in them. In our discourse, we could not agree on the point that "naming" in the below sentence is a verb. The White ...
2
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1answer
99 views

Parsing: “This judge's conclusion” — “this judge,” “this conclusion,” either? [closed]

What is the normal way to parse the following types of phrases? A. [this X]'s Y or B. this [X's Y] This man's opinion This girl's idea This judge's conclusion This politician's ...
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1answer
1k views

Grammatical structure of “cease to exist”

Merriam-Webster lists cease to exist as an example of a transitive use of the verb: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cease Dictionary.com doesn't include the category transitive/...
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2answers
150 views

Ambiguous parsing in the absence of prepositions

Consider the following sentence which may appear, say, in a changelog of a website or an app: Order a taxi button on most pages. Does it allow multiple parsings, i.e. there is an entity named "a ...
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2answers
194 views

Double Negative with Parallelism

I came across this long sentence in a novel, and would like to analyze it grammatically: "I spent [...] time racking my brains for gems of Philosophy [....] , but I have come up with nothing that you ...
2
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3answers
3k views

How to interpret “if it be” grammatically?

It looks to me a subjunctive form but not contemporary, so I would like to ask how this is properly interpreted gramatically. In the second conditional “if it were” it is clearly subjunctive, but ...
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4answers
1k views

Where do I put this phrase in a phrase structure tree?

I am not sure where to put the AdvP in this sentence when drawing a phrase structure tree. This is the sentence I would like to create the tree for: "The car Sam bought last week won the big race." ...
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1answer
108 views

Parsing verb objects

Two questions: 1) Can there be a prepositional phrase between the verb and its objetcts as in this example: "They see in front of their eyes the two towers." or is that grammatically incorrect? ...
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2answers
10k views

“I had been done that” Is this correct?

I teach freshmen English in inner-city Baltimore, and I often get the following: Teacher : Did you complete the homework? Student : I had been done that! I have not been able to give a ...
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2answers
232 views

How to parse “let there be light,” “may grace and peace be multiplied to you,” etc [closed]

Working on a natural language parser and I realized I don't have much a firm handle on how to come at sentences such as the following: "And God said, Let there be light: and there was light" (Genesis ...
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2answers
305 views

Is there a typo in this sentence? If not, help me understand it [closed]

I'm having trouble parsing this sentence: (I hope I used "parsing" correctly.) Now, the history of Eliza Doolittle, though called a romance because of the transfiguration it records seems ...
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3answers
1k views

“Olórin I was in my youth in the West that is forgotten”: what is forgotten?

Inspired by this question (which in turn was inspired by that one), to what name does "that is forgotten" apply to? Many are my names in many countries: Mithrandir among the Elves, Tharkûn to the ...
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4answers
18k views

Ambiguous syntax tree and phrase structure rules

I’m studying for a final for my English Linguistics class and going through example sentences that we should be able to draw syntax trees for. The sentence He looked at the dog with one eye was marked ...
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2answers
93 views

Is “A Spanish Learning Grammar” grammatical?

My friend and I are talking about his renewed interest in Spanish and he is using a book called "A Spanish Learning Grammar"? I assume this is grammatical since its the title of a published book on ...
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2answers
83 views

Can we parse this sentence in two ways?

Being a Maia didn't stop Elendil and Gil-Galad from kicking his butt. As of now, this is an apt comment on this question at SFF (Why does Sauron fear Aragorn if he is a Maia?). I wonder whether, ...
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2answers
237 views

When parsing the noun phrase…which is modifying which?

Closest feeling to death is pain. The noun phrase is "closest feeling to death". But I don't know how to parse this sentence...there seem to be two ways to parse this sentence. A. {Closest [...
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3answers
83 views

Parse: “of neither of which having any distinct perception at all can I have any idea of its essence”

This article introduced me to the source: Point 6, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689), Chapter XXXI, Of Adequate and Inadequate Ideas by John Locke. The particular parcel of matter ...