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Questions tagged [parsing]

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Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
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1answer
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CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
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Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
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2answers
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Indirect complement or postmodifier in NP

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? ...
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Is “the better” a noun phrase in this sentence? How to parse this sentence?

A sentence from this site reads ungrammatical. On the sweet side, don’t pass up the walnut coffee cake, which is served warm, the better to soak up the bourbon-caramel glaze. Is the better a noun ...
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1answer
55 views

Function of fractions in NPs + form of subsequent verb

I have two questions about the clause two thirds of the book deals with WWII: i) how do we analyse the subject of this clause from a syntactic point of view? I'd analyse it as a NP, with the ...
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1answer
119 views

X-bar tree for a sentence

Those talents, as they make a part of his fortune, so do they likewise of that of the society to which he belongs. (Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations) The structure of the sentence above from Adam ...
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1answer
195 views

Identifying the main clause and subordinate clauses

I’m preparing for my exam and in one of the practice questions i have to identify the main clause, subordinate clause/s and the subject,predicate and/or adverbials. the sentence is: "The Mausoleum ...
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1answer
47 views

Multiple relative clauses within subject?

I'm wondering what is the actual subject in this sentence: "One of the countries she has visited that I have not is Canada." To me, everything up until 'is' seems like the subject, but I can't find ...
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“The men at the shop, two of whom John knows, are helpful.” Is the relative clause restrictive or nonrestrictive?

The men at the shop, two of whom John knows, are helpful. Is the relative clause nonrestrictive or restrictive? Or ambiguous? (For written English) (1) If it is nonrestrictive, the interpretation ...
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1answer
82 views

What do introductory non-finite clauses modify?

I posted the following question in Linguistics Stack Exchange, but since I'm asking about English grammar, I'm thinking that this is a better forum for it. The question: The introductory non-finite ...
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How do I decide which to choose syntax tree to parse a sentence?

For example, I have a sentence like: The dog is running to the tree. I need to parse this tree to components and I want to use syntax tree models (tense phrase, noun phrase, etc.). Which one is ...
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Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
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2answers
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How do I parse the phrase “it stands to reason”?

In the phrase "it stands to reason that...", is reason a verb or a noun? If it is a verb, it is subordinate to the verb stands, which is being used metaphorically: it is sound/stable for one to ...
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How do you parse comparison structures?

How do you parse structures that make a comparison – specifically as ... as and more/-er ... than? Example 1: He is as cute as an angel – here I would analyse as cute as an angel as an AdjP ...
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2answers
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What are the rules for parsing negation before “all”, “any”, and “every” in English? [duplicate]

My question is about how a negated "all", "any", and "every" statements are usually and correctly understood in English. I have just realized an apparent parsing ambiguity in all such statements (i.e.,...
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2answers
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How do you parse Trump's Tweet?

Trump recently tweeted: ...peace treaty with Israel. We have taken Jerusalem, the toughest part of the negotiation, off the table, but Israel, for that, would have had to pay more. But with the ...
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Changing meaning of “it” in similar sentences

I saw a sentence like this: A: "Linux is a success and it is worth using it." It seemed like a repetition and I thought it was equivalent to this: B: "Linux is a success and it is worth using." ...
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4answers
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Grammar of 'no matter what'

I am struggling to parse no matter what. (There are a couple questions on the site about the phrase no matter what but they revolve around how to use it.) Is matter here a verb? Is it a noun? If it ...
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The yellow big dog [duplicate]

Consider the phrases: "The big yellow dog". "The yellow big dog". "The big little dog". "The red yellow dog". Only the first sounds natural. What rules of grammar say that size must come before ...
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How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few ...
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1answer
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English Morpho-Syntactic Parsing (Shakespeare)

Could anybody give me a hand with the morpho-syntactic parsing of the following lines from Shakespeare? From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty’s rose might never die, ...
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1answer
334 views

Help me parse this sentence

I and my friend have started examining sentences to recognise parts of speech in them. In our discourse, we could not agree on the point that "naming" in the below sentence is a verb. The White ...
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1answer
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Parsing: “This judge's conclusion” — “this judge,” “this conclusion,” either? [closed]

What is the normal way to parse the following types of phrases? A. [this X]'s Y or B. this [X's Y] This man's opinion This girl's idea This judge's conclusion This politician's ...
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1answer
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Grammatical structure of “cease to exist”

Merriam-Webster lists cease to exist as an example of a transitive use of the verb: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cease Dictionary.com doesn't include the category transitive/...
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Ambiguous parsing in the absence of prepositions

Consider the following sentence which may appear, say, in a changelog of a website or an app: Order a taxi button on most pages. Does it allow multiple parsings, i.e. there is an entity named "a ...
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Double Negative with Parallelism

I came across this long sentence in a novel, and would like to analyze it grammatically: "I spent [...] time racking my brains for gems of Philosophy [....] , but I have come up with nothing that you ...
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1answer
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How to interpret “if it be” grammatically?

It looks to me a subjunctive form but not contemporary, so I would like to ask how this is properly interpreted gramatically. In the second conditional “if it were” it is clearly subjunctive, but ...
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4answers
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Where do I put this phrase in a phrase structure tree?

I am not sure where to put the AdvP in this sentence when drawing a phrase structure tree. This is the sentence I would like to create the tree for: "The car Sam bought last week won the big race." ...
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1answer
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Parsing verb objects

Two questions: 1) Can there be a prepositional phrase between the verb and its objetcts as in this example: "They see in front of their eyes the two towers." or is that grammatically incorrect? ...
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“I had been done that” Is this correct?

I teach freshmen English in inner-city Baltimore, and I often get the following: Teacher : Did you complete the homework? Student : I had been done that! I have not been able to give a ...
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How to parse “let there be light,” “may grace and peace be multiplied to you,” etc [closed]

Working on a natural language parser and I realized I don't have much a firm handle on how to come at sentences such as the following: "And God said, Let there be light: and there was light" (Genesis ...
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240 views

Is there a typo in this sentence? If not, help me understand it [closed]

I'm having trouble parsing this sentence: (I hope I used "parsing" correctly.) Now, the history of Eliza Doolittle, though called a romance because of the transfiguration it records seems ...
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“Olórin I was in my youth in the West that is forgotten”: what is forgotten?

Inspired by this question (which in turn was inspired by that one), to what name does "that is forgotten" apply to? Many are my names in many countries: Mithrandir among the Elves, Tharkûn to the ...
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4answers
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Ambiguous syntax tree and phrase structure rules

I’m studying for a final for my English Linguistics class and going through example sentences that we should be able to draw syntax trees for. The sentence He looked at the dog with one eye was marked ...
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2answers
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Is “A Spanish Learning Grammar” grammatical?

My friend and I are talking about his renewed interest in Spanish and he is using a book called "A Spanish Learning Grammar"? I assume this is grammatical since its the title of a published book on ...
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Can we parse this sentence in two ways?

Being a Maia didn't stop Elendil and Gil-Galad from kicking his butt. As of now, this is an apt comment on this question at SFF (Why does Sauron fear Aragorn if he is a Maia?). I wonder whether, ...
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When parsing the noun phrase…which is modifying which?

Closest feeling to death is pain. The noun phrase is "closest feeling to death". But I don't know how to parse this sentence...there seem to be two ways to parse this sentence. A. {Closest [...
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Parse: “of neither of which having any distinct perception at all can I have any idea of its essence”

This article introduced me to the source: Point 6, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689), Chapter XXXI, Of Adequate and Inadequate Ideas by John Locke. The particular parcel of matter ...
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1answer
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Theirs will be a great torment

I have run into such a verse in Quaran: Allah has set a seal on their hearts and on their hearings, and on their eyes there is a covering. Theirs will be a great torment How should I parse the ...
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1answer
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Parsing a difficult sentence

I'm having trouble understanding this sentence from a book on system theory, which reads like a modern version of Euclid's Elements: Intuitively, we would expect the concept of a system to involve ...
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1answer
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Am I parsing this incorrectly, or is it really possible to read in ambiguity without more context?

A while ago, I saw the following advert on Facebook: Uber is a flexible way to earn extra money and meet new people giving rides with your own car. Now, being a bit of a pedant, I concluded that ...
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1answer
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Preposition “over” vs Adverb “over”

annual growth of [over 7 percent] What do you think the part of "over" is? Is "over" considered the preposition of the object "7 percent"? over [7 percent] Or, is "over" considered the ...
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True meaning of these 'adverbials'

Recently I had a discussion with someone and the following examples were brought up. I was told that I was wrong, but as a native speaker I don't think any of my explanations of the meaning were wrong,...
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Grammar parsing

Could anybody parse these words, please, because I am not sure I get all the subtleties. I am intereseted not in their semantics, but rather sentence syntax. On which soil we stand on, that is ...
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1answer
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Is a predicative adjunct part of a noun, or is it part of the sentence?

I just recently learned about predicative adjunct which is present in the following sentence by the "ready to race" adjectival phrase. I wonder whether the phrase that functions as a predicative ...
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What does “not” modify?

The word "not" is an adverb. I am trying to clarify what it modifies. 1: Consider the sentence: "The person is not smart". Is "not" modifying "is" or "smart"? How can I tell? According to the ...
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subject - verb - ? and parsing

Compare these 2 sentences: The capital of Belgium is Brussels. Brussels is the capital of Belgium. I have a few questions: What is the grammatical name of the non-subject, non-verb part in the ...