Questions tagged [orthography]

This tag is for questions concerning the written representation of the English language, especially spelling and word breaks (including hyphenation).

29 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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1answer
96 views

Use of superscript 'x'(?) as an abbreviation for 'yards'

I'm currently working with some handwritten notes that look like they could be quite old, or at least written by somebody who grew up a little bit earlier than I did. I don't really know when they ...
2
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1answer
332 views

“miss assessed” “miss-assessed” or “misassessed”?

I googled this, and I am getting ambiguous results. In books, even in legal documents, I can find examples of "misassess", "miss assess" and "miss-assess". What is the correct way to spell this verb? ...
2
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2answers
154 views

Using a designer's name or brand name as a substitute for the product itself

Example: A character owns a pair of Sophia Loren sunglasses. Before going out for the afternoon, "She drew on her Sophia Loren’s, flipped her long mane back, and tossed him a cheeky grin." If I'm not ...
2
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0answers
979 views

About how many words of four letters are there in English?

I was trying to determine about how many words there are in English, with four letters. (Ideally, excluding "s" plural, so cats and dogs would not be included.) Does anyone have any concrete ...
2
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0answers
406 views

Exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant

Is there a word for exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant by holding it longer than normal? When conveying this in writing, does it fall in the same category as an accent or dialect (...
2
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1answer
2k views

Why is J often used to represent a “Y” sound in Romanizations of other writing systems?

I am not referring to IPA. I am referring to examples in textbooks. For example, my Ukrainian textbook says that the letter Я is pronounced as "ja". Most native English speakers would pronounced this ...
2
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1answer
459 views

Word for words with close/similar spellings

I am working on Levenshtein distance and I try to explain the concept. Is there a word that means that 2 words are "close graphically speaking". I found homophone, or homogragh, but these words are ...
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0answers
24 views

Determine the difficulty of spelling a word

Is there a formula or a method to determine the spelling difficulty of a word? For example, Cat would be 1, appendectomy would be would be a 5, etc.?
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0answers
28 views

Is it ok to have a semicolon after a colon or em dash? (or other variations)

I've looked all over but have not found this example. Can one use a semicolon after a colon or em-dash (or similar doubling up combinations). Is it a matter of style or is there a fast rule? e.g.: ...
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0answers
51 views

Tying. Is Tieing really that unusual?

When tieing two things together, e.g: Two distinct ideas, but with a common theme tieing them together Tieing shoe laces is easy. I have always spelt it with an ie. Now I am being told by ...
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0answers
47 views

Spelling changes

There was a word I learned to spell when I was 11 in which there was a silent G. It is no longer used. Right now I cannot remember the word, but I am interested in finding out how to locate U.S. ...
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0answers
38 views

Are you able to interpret the word '' in '' at this paragraph?

Paragraph : They found that people were more honest when they were watched by eyes than when there were pictures of flowers. They put times as much money in.
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67 views

Consistency. If I write 'recognize' with a 'z' do I have to write 'characterize' with a 'z' too?

I'm translating a book and need to keep the English orthography consistent. I'm a native 'British English' speaker. I know in British English you can often use either 'ize' or 'ise' endings. My ...
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0answers
81 views

How to write in letters numbers that have symbols in between?

I am translating a document that has the identification numbers 2017-976 written in letters this way: two thousand seventeen-nine hundred seventy-six. I was doubting about placing the dash like that ...
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0answers
894 views

Can I use a question mark and the a comma or semicolon here? If not, how can I write this coherently?

What is the correct way to punctuate a sentence like the following? The problem of descrimpivity challenges us to answer the following questions: (1) which is more important, the bibble or the ...
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432 views

Hyphenated and non-hyphenated words that are homophones?

We know of many cases where hyphens are necessary to distinguish a compound word (man-eating) from a pair of separate words (man and eating). But are there any cases where a hyphenated word has a ...
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0answers
34 views

What is the correct modern spelling: colour/color?

I am totally aware of the English and British spellings of this word but now a days, it's mostly seen that the spellings are used anywhere regardless of the accent or place. Even the Microsoft Word ...
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0answers
27 views

S controlled words

The sound of s has different phonemes Police - ce has a sound Psychology - psy has s sound Scent - Sc has a sound Are these are governed by any rule?
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0answers
35 views

ground breaking vs. groundbreaking

Apparently, groundbreaking is the correct spelling, but "ground breaking" has 7682 hits on iWeb Corpus. How common is it for an "incorrect spelling" to be used so frequently? Is it even incorrect if ...
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0answers
29 views

Macroregional or Macro-Regional?

I have searched for the correct spelling of "macroregional / macro-regional" on the Internet, but there are used both variants (sometimes even on the same website). Wiktionary spells it as "...
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196 views

Terminal “f” versus “ff” in anglicized Russian surnames

Today, foreign names are anglicized more or less systematically from their original spelling: the Russian surname "Петров" generally becomes "Petrov", not the calqued "Peterson" or the more phonetic "...
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143 views

Any research data on spelling mistakes in English?

I am developing a "did you mean?" suggestion for my project similar to Google's suggestion. To make the algorithm to work faster, I am looking for a data or any research done on English spelling ...
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0answers
106 views

Which is the correct orthography?

Which is the correct orthography: "Four month-time"; or "Four months' time"; or "Four months time"; or "Four months-time"?
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375 views

When writing in cursive, what is the proper way to write an acronym?

Would I just write the letters in cursive or switch to block text?
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0answers
121 views

Capitalization of “diploma business informatics”

For an application I need to translate my resume. What is the right way spelling of my degree: 2010-2015 Diploma business informatics 2010-2015 Diploma Business Informatics 2010-2015 Diploma of ...
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1answer
59 views

Is there a Word to describe Words that have Differing Masculine and Feminine Forms?

Granted that English has few such words, blond/blonde and fiancé/fiancée are the only ones that immediately come to mind. Apart from calling them "words with gender-specific forms", the closest I've ...
0
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1answer
411 views

What is the proper usage of “high school” as an adjective?

I want to indicate that a friend's brother is in high school. For example, I was not close with my friend's high-school brother. Is this construction correct? Should it be high-schooler brother ...
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2answers
408 views

“25th De­cem­ber” vs “25 De­cem­ber”: Should I use or­di­nals or car­di­nals for the day of the month?

In one of the IELTS lis­ten­ing tests, there is a fill-out-the-blank ques­tion read­ing: The mu­seum is not open on ___. My an­swer was “25th De­cem­ber”. How­ever, the of­fi­cial an­swer is “25 ...
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1answer
32 views

The use of any in this sentence

I want to know if both sentences are correct : Written permission for any such copying. Written permission for anything such copying.