Questions tagged [open-vs-closed-vs-hyphenated]

This tag is used to clarify the spelling of compound words. Should two words be separated by a space, joined with a hyphen, or run together with no space at all?

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

"Multi-Award-Winning" or "Multi-Award Winning"?

Which one is the correct use? I know that "award-winning" uses a hyphen and that "multi" needs a hyphen, but I'm not sure if the hyphen gets a double or single use in "multi-...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
26 views

Under the Chicago Manual of Style, does "year over year" need hyphenation when preceding a noun?

In the sentence, The company experienced strong year[-]over[-]year growth., how does the Chicago Manual of Style govern the hyphenation? Part of me believes that it falls under the "phrases, ...
user avatar
  • 266
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Hyphenation of "connected-component labeling"

This wikipedia page refers to connected-component labeling and it places a hyphen between connected and component, but I think there should not be a hyphen there. I've consulted Canada's hyphenation ...
user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Hyphenating a compound word that is space separated [duplicate]

I have the two concept antibody and metal ion and I would like to pair them with conjugated. In the first case I would use antibody-conjugated. What's the correct typesetting in the second case? Is it ...
user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
2 answers
30 views

Long-term or Long Term? [duplicate]

I'm creating signage for "Long-term Ventilation Unit" and am keeping it as how I just wrote it. But when Googling, I became slightly confused on whether it is "Long Term Ventilation ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
71 views

What is the correct use of dashes in complex phrasal adjectives in British English used in scientific writing?

Are dashes used correctly according to British English rules in the phrases below that appear in published peer-reviewed scientific journals and related articles? If not, why not and what is the ...
user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Are multiple hyphenations allowed in extending compound words like "well-controlled"? [duplicate]

It is common to write the phrase "well controlled" as a single, hyphenated adjective, "well-controlled". If my intention is to place additional adverbs in front of the hyphenated ...
user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
3 answers
126 views

Which one is more correct, "White-eye Man" or “White-Eye Man”?

My son loves white-eyes, a kind of bird,very much. He wants name his storybook like spider man or iron man, so he decides to name it “white-eye man”. I am not quite sure which one is correct if it is ...
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
45 views

"quantum mechanical" vs "quantum-mechanical" [duplicate]

I'm currently writing a short report, where one (sub-)chapter heading reads: The quantum(-)mechanical basics I am now wondering, whether it is preferable with or without the hyphen. When googling ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
59 views

Why is there not a hyphen between "natural" and "language" in the phrase "natural language processing"?

Natural language processing is a field of AI that deals with tasks related to processing natural languages such as English and Spanish, in order to understand and extract data from them. Based on my ...
user avatar
  • 135
0 votes
2 answers
195 views

What is gender-neutral equivalent of poster boy/poster girl?

What is the gender-neutral equivalent of poster boy/poster girl? I want to use it in the context of a company, which is neither he nor she, like in: "a poster boy/poster girl company for self-...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
134 views

Cosmetics: Make up, make-up, or makeup? [closed]

When referring to cosmetics, which is correct? Make up, make-up, or makeup? And does it matter in case of a noun, verb, adjective? The actor playing Frankenstein's monster wore 6 pounds of [makeup | ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
127 views

Which is the correct way to write "Back-end Engineer"? [closed]

On the web, I find the following common ways of punctuating and capitalising "Back-end Engineer" as a job title. Back-End Engineer Back-end Engineer Backend Engineer Which of these is ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
45 views

What's is the right answer: 3-D-printed component vs 3-D printed component vs 3D printed component vs 3D-printed component? [duplicate]

Recently, the editors of a journal where I was publishing a paper changed a small part of the title "3d printed components" for "3-D-Printed Components". However, for a different ...
user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
0 answers
71 views

Hyphenating Compound Nouns

Grammarly says hyphenating is necessary for a compound adjective before a noun as follows. The municipal government is funding a community-based education system. Wind-powered generators can be ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
149 views

Why does English hypenate compounds, while German just mashes them together?

Since starting to learn German, I find myself wanting to use a non-hyphenated word in English, but I always end up adding the hyphen because otherwise it just seems wrong in English. Why is this? Is ...
user avatar
  • 167
0 votes
0 answers
65 views

Overcollecting fees, over collecting fees, or over-collecting fees?

Should "overcollecting" and "undercollecting" be closed in the sentence below? Or should they be open or hyphenated. The hyphenation guide from the Chicago Manual of Style seems to indicate they ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
328 views

Combining open compounds using hyphen in enumerations

In German, when enumerating stuff, one could use an "Ergänzungsstrich". This means that parts of compound words in enumerations that are equal can be shortened like this: Ich mag Eisenbahn-, ...
user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Hyphenate "coal supply contracts"?

Should "coal supply contracts" be hyphenated since "coal supply" modifies "contracts"? Example sentence: Please provide a copy of the coal supply contract.
user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
705 views

This program is error free. Or error-free?

Which one is correct in American English: This computer program is error-free. This computer program is error free. ... and why? Are, perhaps, both correct? If so, is there any difference in the ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
814 views

best - fit vs best fit

I'm having a bit of a disagreement about the use of the words "best fit" vs "best - fit" (note the extra spaces suggested). The sentence is "...and I enjoy analysing human behaviour and drivers to ...
user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Hyphenation of -oriented when preceded by two words [duplicate]

Which of these two is correct: (a) I have experience in data science-oriented programming languages. or (b) I have experience in data-science-oriented programming languages.
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

False-alarm rate? [duplicate]

When refering to the rate or probability of getting a false alarm from any kind of system for fault detection, I usually see "false alarm rate" writen, but I think it should be "false-alarm rate". Are ...
user avatar
  • 242
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

How does one correctly use hyphens in the following contexts?

I read a few articles from APA Style Blog's "Hyphenation Station" series (https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/hyphenation/), and I'm using these tips to guide my writing. I was wondering if anyone on ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
111 views

Hyphen rules: should it be "tracking number" or "tracking-number"? [closed]

In the following sentence: Once you have a tracking number for the shipment. Should it be tracking number or tracking-number? I read through the Wikipedia article, but it didn't give a ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
118 views

Hyphenating measurements in case of a fraction

I am now quite comfortable with the rules of hyphenating measurements (For example, 5-foot-long rod, 7-inch-long handle, etc.) However, what is the rule for hyphenation if the number is a fraction. ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
70 views

Should "uncomment" include a hyphen, or is either one correct?

Should "uncomment" include a hyphen like this: "un-comment", or either one correct?
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

When to use hyphens in compound words

I've been puzzled a lot on when to use a hyphen in compounds words such as cross-section, time-of-flight, state-of-the-art etc. I am writing scientific documents and I haven't found a definite rule on ...
user avatar
  • 123
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

Hyphenation for "300 or 400 level" [duplicate]

Since "400 level" should be hyphenated as "400-level", should "300 or 400 level" be hyphenated as "300- or 400-level," or is there another way to write this?
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
7k views

Usage of high quality vs high-quality

Am I using the correct grammar by not having high quality hyphenated? From direct mail, printing & fulfillment, to database analytics and digital media, Company Name continues to deliver high ...
user avatar
2 votes
7 answers
5k views

When is 'off guard' hyphenated?

How do you decipher when and how to use 'off-guard' or 'off guard'? Example sentences “I wanted to find it before my opponents did,” he clarified. “So, if anything was brought up during one of ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
1k views

"Testbed" or "test bed"? [duplicate]

"A testbed is a platform for conducting rigorous, transparent, and replicable testing of scientific theories, computational tools, and new technologies" (Wikipedia). While Wikipedia seems to prefer "...
user avatar
  • 139
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

Hyphenating "Pulitzer Prize winning" as adjective

I'm looking for authority on hyphenating the following phrase with a compound modifier. Which is correct? She was a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, or She was a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, or ...
user avatar
  • 435
1 vote
1 answer
132 views

Should "in-cabin" be hyphenated in "the dogs must ride in-cabin on the airplane"? [duplicate]

Would the term in-cabin be hyphenated or not? As in, the dogs must ride in-cabin on the airplane.
user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
2 answers
90 views

'The snap election results' or 'The snap-election results'? [closed]

Which of the two is grammatically correct? The snap election results are in. The snap-election results are in. The sentence should refer to the results of an election that was announced suddenly and ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
623 views

Hyphenating a compound noun in conjunction with '-related'

This is a bit of a conundrum, if you ask me. The compound noun in my title, 'Fluid Flow' does not require hyphenation. On the other hand, this is then followed by '-Related'. If I were to put: "Fluid ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Should "request-after-request" be hyphenated?

"All day I get request-after-request for help on passing the Quality Assessment." The sentence above was originally written as, "All day I get request after request for help on passing the Quality ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
11k views

What is the difference between "twenty-four-hour shift" and twenty-four hour shift"? [closed]

Just read somewhere about this puzzling puzzle: What is the difference between: I'm doing a twenty four-hour shift tonight. I'm doing a twenty-four hour shift tonight. I'm doing a twenty-four-hour ...
user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
3k views

hyphen in noun-gerund compounds

I am lost with the rule that noun-gerund compounds do not get a hyphen if used as nouns. Example: He liked novel reading. Is it correct not to use a hyphen between novel and reading here? I ...
user avatar
  • 159
4 votes
2 answers
4k views

Which form would be correct: cyber security, cyber-security or cybersecurity?

I want to stop changing my mind, I've used all three of the forms cyber security, cyber-security or cybersecurity at different times. There have been previous discussions on this (e.g. here and here) ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Why are open source and closed source usually not hyphenated? Should they be? [duplicate]

Typically, English writers do not hyphenate open source or closed source when referring to computer software. Why is this? Should they be hyphenated or is it best to not use hyphens for these terms?
user avatar
3 votes
5 answers
32k views

Nonstop, non-stop, or non stop? [closed]

Which is the proper spelling of "nonstop?" nonstop or non stop or non-stop
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

How can one decide whether to use the compound form of a word when the one- or two-word versions are acceptable? [duplicate]

This question is an attempt to find an abstract answer to every "one word or two?" discussion. My problem is exemplified by this scenario: My text editor's spellchecker recently corrected me on my ...
user avatar
  • 107
15 votes
3 answers
16k views

How should a multiple-word noun be punctuated within a compound adjective? [duplicate]

I would like to use a noun made of multiple words (like particle board, Mount Everest, or windscreen wiper) in a compound adjective with a hyphen. But I don't know how to hyphenate such a composition....
user avatar
  • 353
25 votes
4 answers
28k views

Timestep, time step, time-step: Which variant to use?

I am writing a piece on integration of differential equations. One of the words that I have to use frequently is "timestep" (however it is written), i.e. a step forward in the "simulated" time. There ...
user avatar
  • 351
1 vote
2 answers
841 views

Does this open compound noun require a hyphen when used as an adjective?

A friend of mine works at a restaurant that sells tortilla soup; however, I think the soup tastes like hot dogs. There are thus three ways to write this: hot dog soup, hot-dog soup, hotdog soup. Only ...
user avatar
  • 1,029
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Where can I find a list of words that contain one or more spaces, such as ice cream? [closed]

This post asked if ice cream was one word or two. John Lawler's comment seems logical and accurate to me: "Space: The Final Frontier. The answer to the question is "Yes". That is, some people ...
user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
3 answers
11k views

Joining two words to make a single word

I am international engineering student studying in US. I have a question regarding words that are created as a result of joining two words. Usually this happens when two technologies or methodologies ...
user avatar
  • 3
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Child-murderer or child murderer?

During an episode of Archer, he criticized a journalist's grammar for her misuse of the word 'child-murderer'. She meant one who murders children, and Archer argued in using the hyphenated form, she ...
user avatar
  • 41
10 votes
2 answers
30k views

nonexistent, non-existent or non existent? [duplicate]

I see various spellings of the same, which one is correct? I have considered that the spelling might differ if it is British or American English, but as English isn't my native speak I have no clue.
user avatar
  • 227