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Questions tagged [omissibility]

For questions about leaving out words or punctuation marks and how such omissions affect the meaning of clauses or sentences.

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3answers
65 views

Article before nouns in the appositive phrase?

Here are two examples: Nobody creates post-apocalyptic flicks better than George Miller, the director of Mad Max series. Is the necessary before director, and can it be omitted? The business was ...
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2answers
51 views

how to understand this sentence “unbelievably slow in appreciating their good fortune in ruling the country…”?

Here are two consecutive paragraphs from The Adventure of English by Melvyn Bragg: The extensive range of what I would call “almost synonyms” became one of the glories of the English language, ...
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1answer
52 views

Confusion in the usage of the conjunction word “that”

I read an article on the National Geographic website: In this sentence: We reach the water and I try to swim – but the water is so salty I just float on the surface. Cannot we use "that" ...
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1answer
78 views

commas/ omitting “which is”

In the passage below, shouldn't the writer have included which is before the word championed, since it is in a non-defining clause? In seeking to describe the origins of theater, one must rely ...
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1answer
28 views

Is 'alternative mobilities' a correct way to refer to car/bike sharing?

Instead of alternative mobility services (referring to car-sharing, bike-sharing and others) does alternative mobilities make sense? What can be a synonym of service or an alternative way of saying?
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1answer
28 views

differentiate `to+verb` from `verb` in the context of a list

He gives wisdom and knowledge to enable his children to understand and see the invisible. He gives wisdom and knowledge to enable his children to understand and to see the invisible. Sometimes I ...
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0answers
72 views

What do we call the process of dropping the subject at the beginning of a sentence?

In casual conversation I've been noticing this more and more in my own speaking as well as others. The subject will be missing from the beginning of the sentence and instead it's inferred as the ...
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0answers
60 views

Articles- Please remove card

Omission of articles is often, in my opinion, quite confusing, as they are often omitted in cases I'd find them needed. I know that some of it might just be for simplicity sake- teachers can't always ...
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0answers
50 views

Original form of this sentence : Our collection spans musical genres from rock and roll to opera, highlighting England's great artistic contributors

I think there is relative pronouns omitted in this sentence. "Our collection spans musical genres from rock and roll to opera, highlighting England's great artistic contributors." And What I want to ...
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0answers
134 views

the omission of so of so-that

In monarchical countries, the estates and the greatest portion of the wealth are left to the first son, that the vanity of the parent may be gratified by the thought that his name and title are ...
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0answers
36 views

Omitting the subject of a sentence using an apostrophe

I frequently see co-workers omitting the subject of a sentence and replacing it with an apostrophe. Is there some informal rule for this? I could only find anecdotal examples. Here are a few: 1) '...
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0answers
70 views

Interpreting of Omitted subject and verb

When you have a moment, could you please send over next Wednesday’s campaign info? Double-checking a couple details before it goes live to make sure the client is happy! The above sentences are ...
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0answers
331 views

Is it possible to omit a relative pronoun as subject?

When Casals laid eyes on cello music he never knew existed.... I thought the verb 'existed' belongs to the antecedent, 'cello music', and 'he never knew' is just an embedded clause in the sentence. ...
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0answers
24 views

“Whose fault is it if we're” or “whose fault is it we're”?

Two persons are in a difficult situation, and one of them says to the other that because of her, they haven't been able to anticpate this difficult situation. Is this sentence correct: "Whose fault ...