Questions tagged [omissibility]

For questions about leaving out words or punctuation marks and how such omissions affect the meaning of clauses or sentences.

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16 views

What happened to the missing object or objects in “for us to define as we see fit”? [migrated]

Reading through this paragraph, I wonder why the object to see is missing from as we see fit, even though the interpretation remains natural and smooth without it: In 1783, Goethe wrote, “Nature is ...
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38 views

When to omit the article before a noun?

I am confused about when one can omit the article "the"/"a" in front of a noun. Examples are During (the) observation, it was noticed that ... The results of (a) quantitative ...
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25 views

'Ordered' + object + past participle

Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage, page 852 reads The construction ordered + object + past participle (often expressed in the passive) is first recorded in 1781 in AmE ( These things were ...
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28 views

Is the sentence “we don't need to be what they want us to” correct without the “be” in the end?

The formal way to say the sentence would be "we don't need to be what they want us to be", but would it be acceptable and understandable in colloquial language (eg in a song) to say "we ...
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22 views

Comparing/Contrasting Adjectives with/without “the” and “one”

In terms of American English, I'm considering the following 3 options of comparing/contrasting adjectives. Are all of these okay? The red dress is better than blue. The red dress is better than the ...
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2answers
37 views

Adjective-Denoted Nationalities without “the”

I came across the following in the Wall Street Journal, as part of the main story (not the headline), ... Swiss voted narrowly against more hunting, by 52% to 48% ... ... Last year, Swiss voted on ...
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1answer
74 views

Omis­si­bil­ity of the defi­n­ite ar­ti­cle “the” be­fore at­tribu­tive mod­i­fiers of per­sonal names in Amer­i­can English

Are both in­clu­sion and omis­sion of the defi­n­ite ar­ti­cle the be­fore per­sonal names that have at­tribu­tive mod­i­fiers (nom­i­nal or ad­jec­ti­val or both) con­sid­ered gram­mat­i­cal in Amer­i­...
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19 views

When is the omission of relative pronouns acceptable? [duplicate]

So I learned that I tend to forget and unconsciously omit relative pronouns from my sentences, because apart from the fact that the meaning of some clauses without them remain clear and obvious, I ...
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25 views

Could articles be omitted in descriptions of art?

Compiling brief descriptions of art objects, is it okay to make do mostly without articles? For instance (about an old coin), Eagle under crown; shield featuring Moscow’s coat-of-arms on eagle’s ...
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1answer
29 views

omitting auxiliaries and articles in logs [closed]

Is it a widespread practice in logbooks and in written accounts of events in general to omit articles and auxiliaries? E.g.: "Message received. Information read. Crew instructed. Complaints ...
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1answer
20 views

Dropping “when” in an adverbial clause renders this sentence ungrammatical?

Please consider these sentences side by side: When walking in a dark alley, you should be cautious. When walking in a dark alley, be cautious. Walking in a dark alley, be cautious. Walking in a dark ...
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1answer
205 views

Have difficulty/difficulties (in) doing something

What is syntactically the -ing-phrase in both the versions with and without the preposition? For example in He has trouble [in] keeping things in perspective right now. Secondly, does the latter ...
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1answer
26 views

Why in “think about/of” and “talk about” the “of” and “about” sometimes are omitted?

I sometimes see, more often of late, that in sentences like this: There're less known but high performing currencies: think of Georgian Larry, Armenian Dram. "of" or "about" get ...
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15 views

Is it grammatical with the omission of the clause?

I've heard many clauses like 'I don't know why', 'I know why' in lyrics in songs. In an indirect question clause, can I use a interrogative word without the following clause? E.g. 'I know how', 'I ...
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1answer
27 views

Is it correct to omit “be” verbs and conjunctions when reporting a sentence? [duplicate]

Can you say "Actor dead aged 44" instead of elaborately saying "Actor dies at age 44"?
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29 views

When two “be” verbs are used in one sentence, should the second be omitted?

For example He is a teenager and [is] from South Sudan. Is it necessary to delete the second "is" in parentheses?
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2answers
78 views

Do I need to repeat a verb in a second clause?

He will not only pass the exam but will also excel in sports. He will not only pass the exam but also excel in sports. Which one is correct?
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2answers
49 views

Omitting pronouns in conditional clauses

I have a dispute with an acquaintance over this sentence: If [you're] looking for aliases that will be displayed in the help message, see the link above. ("you're" is omitted) I'm pretty ...
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1answer
69 views

omission of semantic subject

Toni Morrison began writing when she was in college, but she did not produce anything good enough to publish for many years. Her troubled marriage, divorce, and life as a single mother made it even ...
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3answers
1k views

“The place I was born” vs. “The place I was born in”

This is the place where I was born. [1] I can omit where & keep the antecedent place : This is the place I was born. [1a] I can omit the antecedent place and keep the relative word where : ...
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1answer
34 views

Omission of subject in tensed clause

I know the subject can be omitted in untensed clauses. But I've encountered with the following: You spent more money than was intended to be spent. Here, 'than' seems to be functioning like a ...
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1answer
57 views

Go fun the world - is it correct?

I want to know if 9Gag slogan "Go fun the world" is correct or not. I know that it is ok to say "Let's go have fun" but the slogan above misses "have". Is it ok? One more - is "word" addressee there? ...
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43 views

How do I omit part of part of a legal definition with an ellipsis?

I need to contract the below sentence (it was legalese that I have simplified) to just present (b), but need to indicate that (b) is not the only condition: Ending on the earlier of (a) [occurrence]...
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3answers
884 views

What’s the long form corresponding to the short form “English Language & Usage”?

Am I right that ①English Lan­guage & Usage is the short form ei­ther for ②English Lan­guage & Its Usage or else for ③English Lan­guage & The Usage of It, rather than for ④English Lan­guage ...
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1answer
119 views

When can I omit the auxiliary verb in Past Perfect…?

I've come across two examples of past-perfect in the textbook and was wondering if someone could please explain why the latter sentences still use 'had' and why it shouldn't be omitted: 1) When I ...
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135 views

Omitting Relative Pronoun and verb “be” [duplicate]

Could someone please explain, why the pronoun and the verb "be" are omitted in the following sentence? "it allows communication even for people far away from each other" Shouldn't this sentence be "...
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2answers
334 views

What do you call the sentence structure of “The X-er __, the Y-er __”?

Is there a term for a sentence in the form of "The ___, the ___"? For example: The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear. Further, is this a proper sentence? Is there an implied verb?...
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2answers
170 views

Omission of “is” in “She thought the study of Latin a waste of time.”

In The Elements of Style, the authors give this example: She thought the study of Latin a waste of time. I cannot understand why the verb is has been omitted. Should not this sentence be as: ...
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2answers
569 views

If it isn't [someone's name]!

"If it isn't [a name]!" can be used to show surprise when you bump into someone, but it is not a complete sentence. What is omitted (and understood) here? I'd appreciate your help.
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83 views

Can you omit only a subject following “as long as?”

Can you leave a subject following “as long as” out, keeping the verb followed alive? I can read it aloud for you as long as it is in English. So you can watch any movies as long as they have ...
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1answer
84 views

The “that” elimination problem

The sentence I marveled that you chuckled that I said "juxtaposition". suffers from "that" overload. We'd all agree. It's easy to slim either 'that'. Hence either I marveled you chuckled that I ...
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1answer
124 views

Since and for, where can they be omitted?

I’m well aware of the difference between ‘since’ and ‘for’. However I have a question. Imagine I say ‘I’ve been working on the essay since Saturday’ or ‘I’ve been working on the essay for two days’. ...
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1answer
94 views

commas/ omitting “which is”

In the passage below, shouldn't the writer have included which is before the word championed, since it is in a non-defining clause? In seeking to describe the origins of theater, one must rely ...
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3answers
199 views

Article before nouns in the appositive phrase?

Here are two examples: Nobody creates post-apocalyptic flicks better than George Miller, the director of the Mad Max series. Is the necessary before director, and can it be omitted? The business ...
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1answer
36 views

differentiate `to+verb` from `verb` in the context of a list

He gives wisdom and knowledge to enable his children to understand and see the invisible. He gives wisdom and knowledge to enable his children to understand and to see the invisible. Sometimes I ...
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1answer
679 views

How to omit lines when quoting a play

I am citing the play All My Sons in an essay I am writing. I don't want to have a lot of unnecessary content in my quotes and I am not too familiar with quoting plays, so I want to ask how I should ...
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508 views

What do we call the process of dropping the subject at the beginning of a sentence?

In casual conversation I've been noticing this more and more in my own speaking as well as others. The subject will be missing from the beginning of the sentence and instead it's inferred as the ...
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1answer
221 views

Do I need to include “the” for each item in a text sequence

Can anyone please tell me that which is more appealing: • My industrial collaborations at the national and the international levels. • My industrial collaborations at the national and international ...
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1answer
1k views

When can I omit the subject?

Can I omit the subject if it has been mentioned in a preceding sentence? For example, is the phrase inside the parentheses necessary in the below?: The sculpture A exhibits degradation at a ...
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46 views

Is it gramatically correct to omit the preposition “on” when talking about events occuring on a certain day? [duplicate]

I'm taking this online course on technical writing. It suggests that you can omit "on" from The meeting happened on Monday to turn it to The meeting happened Monday The second one seems wrong ...
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2answers
66 views

Can I omit the “is” in “a lower price than is actually intended to be charged”? [closed]

I came across the following sentence when I looked up the meaning of "low-ball". The low-ball is a persuasion and selling technique in which an item or service is offered at a lower price than is ...
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418 views

What do you think about “Sorry.” as a complete sentence? or What are your thoughts on subject omission? [duplicate]

I've been poring over materials on Japanese (日本語) and found it common of them to contrast the language with English in saying that pronominal subjects can be —and typically are, as with 私は (Watashi ha,...
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1answer
67 views

Confusion in the usage of the conjunction word “that”

I read an article on the National Geographic website: In this sentence: We reach the water and I try to swim – but the water is so salty I just float on the surface. Cannot we use "that" ...
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64 views

Articles- Please remove card

Omission of articles is often, in my opinion, quite confusing, as they are often omitted in cases I'd find them needed. I know that some of it might just be for simplicity sake- teachers can't always ...
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3answers
4k views

Which Sunday do you prefer, if Sunday is OK with you?

Which Sunday do you prefer, if Sunday is OK with you? Is the above sentence grammatically correct and natural? I'd like answers both from BrE and AmE speakers. Sorry for my short, abrupt question. ...
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1answer
343 views

When can the relative pronouns “who”, “which”, “that” etc. be safely omitted? [closed]

For example, instead of The guy who is beside me is a jerk I can say The guy beside me is a jerk. It is okay if I don't use the relative pronoun here, either way is correct. But instead ...
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2answers
305 views

Using `but` as a conditional limit on a clause. Also implied or omitted `if`

I wanted to communicate the following with someone: I would do this thing, if I could do it. However, always trying to be clever and using amusing, possibly archaic grammar I wanted to type: I ...
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2answers
2k views

Omit same verbs in list of clauses

First, I have to admit that I don't know a good term to refer to this case, nor do I have a concrete example. Everything is just from a vague memory. So if you can correct me or suggest a good ...
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56 views

Original form of this sentence : Our collection spans musical genres from rock and roll to opera, highlighting England's great artistic contributors

I think there is relative pronouns omitted in this sentence. "Our collection spans musical genres from rock and roll to opera, highlighting England's great artistic contributors." And What I want to ...
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201 views

the omission of so of so-that

In monarchical countries, the estates and the greatest portion of the wealth are left to the first son, that the vanity of the parent may be gratified by the thought that his name and title are ...