Questions tagged [old-norse]

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Pronunciation of -wic in place names

In the TV series The Last Kingdom a number of place names appear. The series typically shows the Ænglisc spelling of place names, followed by the modern one. E.g. the name old name Wintanceaster ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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How certain we are that runes were shaped as we present them

Specifically I am wondering about the A, F, H, J, L, and T. There are others I'm interested in but I don't want to ask too much at once, and these ones are straightforward. The image I am looking at ...
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2 votes
0 answers
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Rune names in Old Norse [closed]

I understand that the runes of the younger futhark alphabet had names such as hagall and bjarkan, I also understand that these rune names had meanings as other words in old norse, such as hail and ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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What would the Old English Wōden look like in Modern English?

What would the Old English Wōden "Odin" look like in Modern English, if it was to undergo regular sound changes? "Wooden" or something?
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5 votes
1 answer
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What semantic notions inverted the meaning of 'with' (from opposition to association)?

[Wiktionary :] From Middle English with, from Old English wiþ ‎(“against, opposite, toward”), a shortened form of wiþer, from Proto-Germanic *wiþr- ‎(“against”), from Proto-Indo-European *wi-tero- ‎(“...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Origin of -(e)s in present indicative third singular

I'm aware that it comes from a Northern dialect of Middle English as in: He sing(e)s With the full Northern conjugation being: Ik sing(e) Þu/ou sing(e)s He sing(e)s We/ye/they sings ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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The meaning of the MIDDLE ENGLISH "nother"

Very specific expertise is required here. The schoolmaster "shall not teche his scolers song nor other petite lernyng, as the crosse rewe, redyng of the mateyns or for the psalter or such ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Is this a 'justified' double negative? The answer may require some Old English knowledge.

The following is is my translation of a sentence from Bede's Account of the Conversion of King Edwin. Old English tolerated the double negative, and I am trying to translate the text in such a way ...
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4 votes
1 answer
912 views

Are certain English words cognates to Old English words?

For example, the English word spoor comes right from the Afrikaans spoor, meaning trail or track. This is from an identical Dutch word which is descended from the Proto-Germanic *spurą, from which ...
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5 votes
1 answer
625 views

Is “are” a borrowed word?

I read somewhere that English is the only language to have borrowed a form of its to be verb from another language. I want to say, if memory serves, that it was are that was borrowed from an early ...
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