Questions tagged [offensive-language]

This tag is for questions about offensive language. It is for questions about words or phrases that could be considered offensive. If reason of offensiveness is belittling or painting a negative light instead of 'just offending' CONSIDER using the tag PEJORATIVE-LANGUAGE.

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52 views

Origin of machine term “Sawmill N—er”

Yes, it's an offensive term and the origin may seem obvious but I wanted to dig deeper. The mechanical device in a sawmill which turned (rotated) the logs in order to saw a new face was known as a &...
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29 views

'I would be so grateful if…' rude?

I am a high school student and I often use 'I would be so grateful if you could take a moment to...' or 'I would be so grateful if you could help me.' or something like that when I am writing an ...
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1answer
157 views

On a certain pejorative in contemporary British English

According to the OED https://www.oed.com/viewdictionaryentry/Entry/67623) "faggot" and "fag", used to refer to gay men in a derogatory way are "originally and chiefly North ...
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5answers
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Was the word that is now considered a slur against Japanese people ever considered simply a standard, neutral demonym?

It seems the word 'Jap' could have formed along the same lines as 'Finn' (for Finland) and 'Swede' (for Sweden). Perhaps it became more emotively charged during the war?
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1answer
32 views

Why is 'used to troll' a potentially bad keyword? [closed]

CharcoalHQ caught a post about appealing a network wide ban on Meta.SE yesterday. Potentially bad keyword in body The bad keyword is apparently 'used to troll.' What's toxic or potentially bad about ...
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2answers
108 views

Gender-unspecific pejorative for somebody selling themselves for personal benefit (not prostitution)

What would be alternative words for whore which do not primarily reference women? In this case by whore I do not mean a prostitute, but a person who is willing to sell themselves out for personal ...
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12answers
5k views

Does English use the word ‘thou’ in any situations nowadays? [closed]

Does English use the word thou in situations nowadays? For example, to humiliate an opponent by being overly familiar?
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2answers
109 views

How can I replace the most popular cuss words with words which don't sound overly deliberately euphemistic and outright childish? [closed]

It's not that I curse a lot, even when I'm angry, but I don't particularly like the origin of certain, particularly the most popular English ones, cuss words, so I am trying to stop using them ...
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3answers
180 views

How does suffixing adjectives with “ass” work out grammatically?

Why is it grammatically correct apparently to say, for example "My annoying-ass art teacher"? Or is it? If ass is a noun normally, then what part of speech is it when used to suffix an adjective? Can ...
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2answers
193 views

Sun doesn't / don't shine? [duplicate]

I'm curious about the grammar in the vulgar idiom "Where the sun don't shine". Why is there a don't instead of doesn't? The latter strikes me as the correct grammatical form, but I'm not sure.
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0answers
102 views

Has “f**k” lost its profanity? [closed]

I thought that "fuck" was quite vulgar and offensive. However it's used by a nine year old main character in a book aimed at children and young teenagers. [...] even though he told him to ...
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1answer
122 views

Can the word FAQ be considered offensive?

The pronunciation of abbreviation FAQ is not uniform (cf. What is the commonly accepted pronunciation of FAQ?). One of commonly encountered ones is /fæk/. This one, at least to my untrained, non-...
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2answers
107 views

Any less impolite alternatives for the too-informal interjection “Hell”?

Consider the passage: Mathematicians are pretty comfortable with treating spaces without any embedding. A surface can just exist—no need for a volume for it to hover in. It does so with all its ...
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1answer
143 views

Term for “the fatty” used by teenagers

"In seventh grade, I was diagnosed with scoliosis. My nightmare began. A brace restricted my movement and my life; I could not bend or turn, let alone continue with my favorite hobby—dancing. I was ...
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2answers
179 views

Why are there so many American phrases about derrières?

Some examples: Piece-of-ass Move that ass Haul your ass Your ass is mine I'm gonna beat your ass Get that ass in gear Get your ass over here put a cap in that ass cover my ass kick ass ass kicking ...
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1answer
173 views

What does it mean to call someone a wipe?

By the swear words I know it is some insult, I posted this as an answer because the question was stupid. but I am not sure what it exactly means. I heard it in a video at about 0:21 for reference. ...
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1answer
162 views

Is “retard” offensive when used as a verb? [closed]

Obviously calling someone a "retard" or "retarded" is considered offensive. As a noun, it is considered a dated, offensive and pejorative term when used to refer to a person who has a mental ...
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1answer
110 views

Using the F word in the middle of the word [duplicate]

Not sure if I can use the F words here, therefore I will refer to it as f*** or f***in I know that we can use F word in the middle of the sentence like You may f***in not do that or She is f*...
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4answers
951 views

Does this vulgar expression necessarily imply a certain body part?

My question is about the expression "suck on it." Background (you can skip this paragraph if you want): at Spanish SE we were doing some back-translating of a game we were playing in Spanish. When ...
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2answers
1k views

Why is “wong” a bad word?

I just use "wong" as if I am saying "wrong" without the "r". For example "You are wong. try again" However, this word is moderated in roblox chat several times. Merriam Webster and other dictionaries ...
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1answer
114 views

Do religious people avoid all exclamations that start with “holy”? [closed]

When I googled exclamations beginning with "Holy", I found that there is a character on an educational show for kids who said "holy cow" when he saw an elephant Does that mean that exclamations that ...
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1answer
113 views

What does “cold balls” exactly mean in American english?

I've been watching a crime TV anime show lately, and I've run into this fancy and maybe offensive too ( sorry about that, if it is like so ) and to put you guys in the scene context here is a summary: ...
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6answers
12k views

Is it rude to refer to janitors as 'floor people'?

I came into the office today and the first thing my manager asked me was is if I saw the 'floor people' while I was walking through the building. The reason he asked me this was because he had put in ...
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1answer
370 views

Does “things went south” sound offensive for someone from the Southern United States? [duplicate]

As a non-native speaker I've been using this phrase without thinking about how neutral it is actually. In Russian, for instance, we have "незваный гость хуже татарина" (an uninvited guest is worser ...
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0answers
54 views

What is “expletive you” in grammer? [duplicate]

I always interpret "expletive you" as an imperative statement with an implicit subject of "I", although the (less than intelligent) speaker clearly doesn't think of it in this light. Is there any ...
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1answer
1k views

Differences in swearing - UK vs US [closed]

I often watch american series and they all swear like: "fuck", or "don't fucking do this", "what the fuck!" on the softer side: "Jesus Christ!", "Jeez". But I was wondering is, what are the British ...
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1answer
116 views

When whores talk about honor [duplicate]

There is a proverb or saying in Arabic and the exact translation is... "When whores talk about honor" ...this is said when someone points out other people's mistakes while he/she makes the same ...
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4answers
2k views

How did “pissed” come to mean “drunk” or “angry”?

How did "pissed" come to mean "drunk" or "angry" in expressions such as: "I'm pissed" OR "I'm pissed off"? All dictionaries I consulted just gave that definition. So, does it have anything to do - ...
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1answer
104 views

For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [closed]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
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2answers
523 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
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1answer
166 views

What are the constraints on replacements of the phrase “Holy S—t”? [closed]

When my friend found out that the new season of Rick and Morty is going to be released this year, he yelled in excitement: Holy fucking Rick! This is not a valid (ie. grammatically correct) ...
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1answer
243 views

Is there a grammatically need to hyphenate the compound words “dumb f*ck” within a novel?

Would I leave the space, hyphenate it, or combine the two works like its similar, less aggressive counterpart: "dumbass" The quote from my novel is from dialogue "It's been six years, you dumb ...
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2answers
127 views

How do natives pronounce “what the f**k?”

When I hear native speakers, especially Americans say the phrase I expect a "th" sound in "the" but instead, it sounds more like a "t" or "d" sometimes. Am I correct or am I just hearing it wrong?
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1answer
240 views

Is the use of the word “cracker” as a racial slur so common that it cannot safely be used to refer to certain hackers? [duplicate]

I always liked to use the word "crackers" to refer to people who overcome computer software or security restrictions, as opposed to "hackers," which (supposedly) originally meant people skilled at ...
2
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1answer
335 views

Is “he or she” offensive?

I was writing an email and a friend pointed out that I should stop using "he/she" and instead always use "they" to refer to a person of unknown gender, since "he or she" implies there are only two ...
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17answers
6k views

Insult for someone who “doesn't know anything” [closed]

How do you call/insult someone who doesn't know anything (meaning not the simplest/basic or obvious things)? Context: I need it in a dialog of the following form: A: How does <very simple/obvious ...
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4answers
567 views

Is there a term for words which are insults but not vulgar?

Sometimes, when I explain a new word to a friend who doesn't speak English well, I know that the word has to be used carefully, because it is not appropriate in all contexts, or can be offensive if ...
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1answer
148 views

is this answer rude? [closed]

recently some on in LinkedIn send a message to me: Thank you for connecting with me! I am recruiting for an Android Developer role (multiple levels) for a company whose product mostly likely impacts ...
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14answers
6k views

What is an informal term for a person who can't do anything right? [closed]

In Russian we have the term "рукожоп". I would translate it as "asshands" which literally means that your hands grow out of your behind and you can't do anything right (or do ...
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2answers
325 views

What does “d-d” mean? Possible 19th century profanity?

I have several quotes of late-19th-century speech (by British men) which use the abbreviation "d-d" for a word. I'm not sure what it means, but from the context I assume this is profanity of some sort....
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3answers
991 views

“passf***ingport” is it a bad use of interjection?

I was just having a little conversation with a few friends, and I used the word ‘passfuckingport’ out of nowhere. I am not sure what it sparked - my Western friends where alright with it, but one of ...
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5answers
17k views

“Pregnant” as a taboo word

This recent article from The Sun states that the term pregnant, in this specific case referred to Meghan Markle, is considered vulgar by the Queen. According to a recently-resurfaced Us Weekly ...
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2answers
1k views

Why is a strange person called a fruitcake?

Fruitcake is an insulting word for someone who you think is strange or crazy (the Macmillan Dictionary). Why does the word have this meaning? What is the similarity between a strange person and a ...
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2answers
74 views

Connotations of the word Triassic [closed]

Our company is planning to name a new venture as Triassic... and our user base is native English speakers mostly in the US and rest of the world. I wanted to check with native speakers does the word ...
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4answers
260 views

a taboo slang word (solved) [closed]

Excuse me for the following, I don't want to offend anybody. But who could answer my question if not the native speakers? How should we know the depths of the culture with its mays and maynots? I ...
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2answers
1k views

Difference between “vulgar”, “offensive” and “derogatory” [closed]

Why do we use the words "vulgar", "offensive" and "derogatory"? What are the differences between them? For example, on Wiktionary, if we look up "nigger". now offensive, ethnic slur, vulgar, see ...
2
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2answers
270 views

What is the origin of the term “bull****” in its figurative sense? [closed]

When/how did the word "bullshit" or the phrase "I call bullshit" (or its multiple variants) become acceptable in English? Was it a direct adaptation from another language or was it introduced in some ...
3
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4answers
3k views

Is the term Indian Giver politically correct?

My son is Cherokee & uses this term & I was concerned if that is a proper term. I thought it originated because the US government historically gave land & such to tribes, then took it back ...
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1answer
249 views

Why is “n----r” considered extremely offensive while “n---a” is not that much?

Specially considering that they are pronounced similar if not the same. I know "nigga" is also considered offensive by a lot of people but I think on general terms, you're likely to offend more ...
1
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1answer
396 views

' I do think it will be a shame on your part ' - is it an accusation? [closed]

I was just having an 'email fight' with someone, since when I asked him to modify the terms of a call, he responded to me: ' I do think it will be a shame on your part as by not...', which I ...

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