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Questions tagged [offensive-language]

This tag is for questions about offensive language. It is for questions about words or phrases that could be considered offensive. If reason of offensiveness is belittling or painting a negative light instead of 'just offending' CONSIDER using the tag PEJORATIVE-LANGUAGE.

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1answer
82 views

Is “retard” offensive when used as a verb? [closed]

Obviously calling someone a "retard" or "retarded" is considered offensive. As a noun, it is considered a dated, offensive and pejorative term when used to refer to a person who has a mental ...
0
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1answer
90 views

Using the F word in the middle of the word [duplicate]

Not sure if I can use the F words here, therefore I will refer to it as f*** or f***in I know that we can use F word in the middle of the sentence like You may f***in not do that or She is f*...
3
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4answers
143 views

Does this vulgar expression necessarily imply a certain body part?

My question is about the expression "suck on it." Background (you can skip this paragraph if you want): at Spanish SE we were doing some back-translating of a game we were playing in Spanish. When ...
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2answers
456 views

Why is “wong” a bad word?

I just use "wong" as if I am saying "wrong" without the "r". For example "You are wong. try again" However, this word is moderated in roblox chat several times. Merriam Webster and other dictionaries ...
3
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1answer
102 views

Do religious people avoid all exclamations that start with “holy”? [closed]

When I googled exclamations beginning with "Holy", I found that there is a character on an educational show for kids who said "holy cow" when he saw an elephant Does that mean that exclamations that ...
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1answer
93 views

What does “cold balls” exactly mean in American english?

I've been watching a crime TV anime show lately, and I've run into this fancy and maybe offensive too ( sorry about that, if it is like so ) and to put you guys in the scene context here is a summary: ...
18
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6answers
12k views

Is it rude to refer to janitors as 'floor people'?

I came into the office today and the first thing my manager asked me was is if I saw the 'floor people' while I was walking through the building. The reason he asked me this was because he had put in ...
3
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1answer
124 views

Does “things went south” sound offensive for someone from the Southern United States? [duplicate]

As a non-native speaker I've been using this phrase without thinking about how neutral it is actually. In Russian, for instance, we have "незваный гость хуже татарина" (an uninvited guest is worser ...
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0answers
52 views

What is “expletive you” in grammer? [duplicate]

I always interpret "expletive you" as an imperative statement with an implicit subject of "I", although the (less than intelligent) speaker clearly doesn't think of it in this light. Is there any ...
3
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1answer
140 views

Differences in swearing - UK vs US [closed]

I often watch american series and they all swear like: "fuck", or "don't fucking do this", "what the fuck!" on the softer side: "Jesus Christ!", "Jeez". But I was wondering is, what are the British ...
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1answer
87 views

When whores talk about honor [duplicate]

There is a proverb or saying in Arabic and the exact translation is... "When whores talk about honor" ...this is said when someone points out other people's mistakes while he/she makes the same ...
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4answers
502 views

How did “pissed” come to mean “drunk” or “angry”?

How did "pissed" come to mean "drunk" or "angry" in expressions such as: "I'm pissed" OR "I'm pissed off"? All dictionaries I consulted just gave that definition. So, does it have anything to do - ...
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1answer
99 views

For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [closed]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
3
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1answer
199 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
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1answer
106 views

What are the constraints on replacements of the phrase “Holy S—t”? [closed]

When my friend found out that the new season of Rick and Morty is going to be released this year, he yelled in excitement: Holy fucking Rick! This is not a valid (ie. grammatically correct) ...
1
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1answer
81 views

Is there a grammatically need to hyphenate the compound words “dumb f*ck” within a novel?

Would I leave the space, hyphenate it, or combine the two works like its similar, less aggressive counterpart: "dumbass" The quote from my novel is from dialogue "It's been six years, you dumb ...
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2answers
117 views

How do natives pronounce “what the f**k?”

When I hear native speakers, especially Americans say the phrase I expect a "th" sound in "the" but instead, it sounds more like a "t" or "d" sometimes. Am I correct or am I just hearing it wrong?
1
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1answer
74 views

Is the use of the word “cracker” as a racial slur so common that it cannot safely be used to refer to certain hackers? [duplicate]

I always liked to use the word "crackers" to refer to people who overcome computer software or security restrictions, as opposed to "hackers," which (supposedly) originally meant people skilled at ...
2
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1answer
151 views

Is “he or she” offensive?

I was writing an email and a friend pointed out that I should stop using "he/she" and instead always use "they" to refer to a person of unknown gender, since "he or she" implies there are only two ...
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17answers
4k views

Insult for someone who “doesn't know anything” [closed]

How do you call/insult someone who doesn't know anything (meaning not the simplest/basic or obvious things)? Context: I need it in a dialog of the following form: A: How does <very simple/obvious ...
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4answers
436 views

Is there a term for words which are insults but not vulgar?

Sometimes, when I explain a new word to a friend who doesn't speak English well, I know that the word has to be used carefully, because it is not appropriate in all contexts, or can be offensive if ...
0
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1answer
140 views

is this answer rude? [closed]

recently some on in LinkedIn send a message to me: Thank you for connecting with me! I am recruiting for an Android Developer role (multiple levels) for a company whose product mostly likely impacts ...
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14answers
4k views

What is an informal term for a person who can't do anything right? [closed]

In Russian we have the term "рукожоп". I would translate it as "asshands" which literally means that your hands grow out of your behind and you can't do anything right (or do anything at all). ...
0
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2answers
139 views

What does “d-d” mean? Possible 19th century profanity?

I have several quotes of late-19th-century speech (by British men) which use the abbreviation "d-d" for a word. I'm not sure what it means, but from the context I assume this is profanity of some sort....
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3answers
946 views

“passf***ingport” is it a bad use of interjection?

I was just having a little conversation with a few friends, and I used the word ‘passfuckingport’ out of nowhere. I am not sure what it sparked - my Western friends where alright with it, but one of ...
64
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5answers
16k views

“Pregnant” as a taboo word

This recent article from The Sun states that the term pregnant, in this specific case referred to Meghan Markle, is considered vulgar by the Queen. According to a recently-resurfaced Us Weekly ...
3
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2answers
424 views

Why is a strange person called a fruitcake?

Fruitcake is an insulting word for someone who you think is strange or crazy (the Macmillan Dictionary). Why does the word have this meaning? What is the similarity between a strange person and a ...
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2answers
63 views

Connotations of the word Triassic [closed]

Our company is planning to name a new venture as Triassic... and our user base is native English speakers mostly in the US and rest of the world. I wanted to check with native speakers does the word ...
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4answers
200 views

a taboo slang word (solved) [closed]

Excuse me for the following, I don't want to offend anybody. But who could answer my question if not the native speakers? How should we know the depths of the culture with its mays and maynots? I ...
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2answers
779 views

Difference between “vulgar”, “offensive” and “derogatory” [closed]

Why do we use the words "vulgar", "offensive" and "derogatory"? What are the differences between them? For example, on Wiktionary, if we look up "nigger". now offensive, ethnic slur, vulgar, see ...
2
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2answers
164 views

What is the origin of the term “bull****” in its figurative sense? [closed]

When/how did the word "bullshit" or the phrase "I call bullshit" (or its multiple variants) become acceptable in English? Was it a direct adaptation from another language or was it introduced in some ...
3
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4answers
2k views

Is the term Indian Giver politically correct?

My son is Cherokee & uses this term & I was concerned if that is a proper term. I thought it originated because the US government historically gave land & such to tribes, then took it back ...
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1answer
229 views

Why is “n----r” considered extremely offensive while “n---a” is not that much?

Specially considering that they are pronounced similar if not the same. I know "nigga" is also considered offensive by a lot of people but I think on general terms, you're likely to offend more ...
1
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1answer
236 views

' I do think it will be a shame on your part ' - is it an accusation? [closed]

I was just having an 'email fight' with someone, since when I asked him to modify the terms of a call, he responded to me: ' I do think it will be a shame on your part as by not...', which I ...
0
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1answer
131 views

Is this the correct usage of a vulgar and offensive phrase?

There is a funny LICENSE and in this license used an expression: You just DO WHAT THE FUCK YOU WANT TO as long as you NEVER LEAVE A TRACE TO TRACK THE AUTHOR of the original product. Is an ...
0
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1answer
70 views

Help in deconstructing a sentence [closed]

This was a question posed by a friend. I'm myself curious of the answer. I apologize for the explicit content (I left it as is to remove ambiguity). I pretty sure that 'a yuppy fu@k' is a compound ...
3
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3answers
259 views

replacement for homophobic slang

(note: please read through what I am asking before taking offense and feel free to edit to make it less offensive) When I was growing up in the 70-80s it was common for kids to say things like oh, ...
2
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1answer
105 views

Did word “beavis” mean anything before Beavis&Butthead series were aired?

In other words,why Mike Judge named one of characters "Beavis"? Was there also some slang meaning or word play behind it as in "Butthead"?
22
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10answers
9k views

In my native language, we have this obscene saying - don't take a dump in the barrel of honey

The implication is that one must not display a disrespectful behavior in regards to his/her friends or the people he/she knows very well, because as the honey in the barrel won't be edible anymore ...
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2answers
10k views

What is a nice way to say “kicking ass”? [duplicate]

Often in a professional setting, I want to say "X has really been kicking ass (and taking names!)" Sometimes I say "kicking butt" but it doesn't have quite the same emphasis. I don't want to say ass ...
5
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3answers
2k views

Does the word fascist share a root with the anti-gay slur f****t?

My understanding is that the word fascism comes from fasces meaning a bundle of sticks and the slur also had the meaning of a bundle of sticks. Are we looking at false friends?
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4answers
1k views

“Foreign students” vs “International students”

An etymological doubt has hit me. To my surprise, the "writing enhancement software," Grammarly flagged the phrase "foreign students" and suggested "International students" in its place. The reasoning:...
2
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2answers
1k views

Why is it “to have sex” instead of “to sex?”

In English, there is no generally acceptable verb for someone to say the equivalent of "to sex." All our equivalents are either too vulgar ("to fuck", "to bang", "to smash") or too formal ("to ...
2
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1answer
990 views

What is the origin for “- the hell out of -”?

Sometimes expletive sentences contains these words, for example "I'll beat the hell/crap out of him"
22
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19answers
13k views

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____” [closed]

I am writing a poem for school. The verse with the word I need to change is this: 7 hours is too long In much too short a day You really don’t care if you get an answer wrong Because you don’...
0
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1answer
122 views

Is the name "KOON Bar“ offensive? [closed]

A friend of mine opened a bar named “KOON Bar” in Germany. The bar is in Kassel and Kassel is often named as raccoon city, because a lot of raccoons live here. So he was looking for a short version ...
59
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12answers
21k views

Is there a non-vulgar version of “pulled it out of their ass”? [duplicate]

Is there a non-vulgar version of “pulled it out of their ass” ? It's a useful phrase, but not one to be used in professional environments. For example: There is no way John’s projections for next ...
2
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1answer
215 views

Uniquely New York curses

This is kind-of an oddball question but the site rules don't appear to forbid it. If it somehow violates guidelines just let me know and I'll voluntarily take it down. I'm looking for region-specific ...
3
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1answer
642 views

What does “be buggered sideways” mean? [closed]

From the movie "Atomic Blonde" The main character, Lorraine, is briefed by her bosses about a secret document, the list, which can expand the Cold War for another 40 years, if Russians have it. If ...
4
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2answers
1k views

'Colourful Language' with regards to swearing

Why is expletive laden, or coarse language often referred to as being colourful/colorful? Oxford Dictionaries define it, colourful 2.2 (of language) vulgar or rude. ‘colorful words usually ...