Questions tagged [offensive-language]

This tag is for questions about offensive language. It is for questions about words or phrases that could be considered offensive. If reason of offensiveness is belittling or painting a negative light instead of 'just offending' CONSIDER using the tag PEJORATIVE-LANGUAGE.

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3
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1answer
99 views

Do religious people avoid all exclamations that start with “holy”? [closed]

When I googled exclamations beginning with "Holy", I found that there is a character on an educational show for kids who said "holy cow" when he saw an elephant Does that mean that exclamations that ...
18
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6answers
12k views

Is it rude to refer to janitors as 'floor people'?

I came into the office today and the first thing my manager asked me was is if I saw the 'floor people' while I was walking through the building. The reason he asked me this was because he had put in ...
-1
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1answer
86 views

What does “cold balls” exactly mean in American english?

I've been watching a crime TV anime show lately, and I've run into this fancy and maybe offensive too ( sorry about that, if it is like so ) and to put you guys in the scene context here is a summary: ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Is calling someone who resides in the country of India an “Indian” considered a racist slur? [closed]

This morning as I'm sure we all have, I was called by "Microsoft Tech Support". I wasted a half hour of their time saying I couldn't log in before they hung up. Later I had told my Dad, as he asked ...
3
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1answer
113 views

Does “things went south” sound offensive for someone from the Southern United States? [duplicate]

As a non-native speaker I've been using this phrase without thinking about how neutral it is actually. In Russian, for instance, we have "незваный гость хуже татарина" (an uninvited guest is worser ...
0
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0answers
52 views

What is “expletive you” in grammer? [duplicate]

I always interpret "expletive you" as an imperative statement with an implicit subject of "I", although the (less than intelligent) speaker clearly doesn't think of it in this light. Is there any ...
3
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1answer
104 views

Differences in swearing - UK vs US [closed]

I often watch american series and they all swear like: "fuck", or "don't fucking do this", "what the fuck!" on the softer side: "Jesus Christ!", "Jeez". But I was wondering is, what are the British ...
0
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1answer
79 views

When whores talk about honor [duplicate]

There is a proverb or saying in Arabic and the exact translation is... "When whores talk about honor" ...this is said when someone points out other people's mistakes while he/she makes the same ...
64
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5answers
16k views

“Pregnant” as a taboo word

This recent article from The Sun states that the term pregnant, in this specific case referred to Meghan Markle, is considered vulgar by the Queen. According to a recently-resurfaced Us Weekly ...
8
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2answers
8k views

Where does English get the word “condom” from?

Although once a word that dared not speak its name, thanks to popular-culture references as well as the devastating AIDS tragedy, condom seems to be on everyone’s lips these days. But does anybody ...
22
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10answers
8k views

In my native language, we have this obscene saying - don't take a dump in the barrel of honey

The implication is that one must not display a disrespectful behavior in regards to his/her friends or the people he/she knows very well, because as the honey in the barrel won't be edible anymore ...
1
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3answers
434 views

Vulgar slang equivalent to “Breaking someone's balls” [closed]

I need some context before making my question. Context: I was in a pub yesterday and together with a friend of mine we were practicing English (we are in the UK). Between the two of us I'm the one ...
7
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4answers
390 views

How did “pissed” come to mean “drunk” or “angry”?

How did "pissed" come to mean "drunk" or "angry" in expressions such as: "I'm pissed" OR "I'm pissed off"? All dictionaries I consulted just gave that definition. So, does it have anything to do - ...
-3
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1answer
98 views

For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [closed]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
3
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1answer
179 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
1
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1answer
103 views

What are the constraints on replacements of the phrase “Holy S—t”? [closed]

When my friend found out that the new season of Rick and Morty is going to be released this year, he yelled in excitement: Holy fucking Rick! This is not a valid (ie. grammatically correct) ...
2
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2answers
177 views

Did “Dutch defence” pre-date the chess term?

Did the phrase "Dutch defence" pre-date the use of the term in chess? The Wikipedia article on Dutch Defence says the concept described by the term originated in the 18th century: Elias Stein (...
1
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1answer
70 views

Is there a grammatically need to hyphenate the compound words “dumb f*ck” within a novel?

Would I leave the space, hyphenate it, or combine the two works like its similar, less aggressive counterpart: "dumbass" The quote from my novel is from dialogue "It's been six years, you dumb ...
0
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2answers
117 views

How do natives pronounce “what the f**k?”

When I hear native speakers, especially Americans say the phrase I expect a "th" sound in "the" but instead, it sounds more like a "t" or "d" sometimes. Am I correct or am I just hearing it wrong?
1
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1answer
63 views

Is the use of the word “cracker” as a racial slur so common that it cannot safely be used to refer to certain hackers? [duplicate]

I always liked to use the word "crackers" to refer to people who overcome computer software or security restrictions, as opposed to "hackers," which (supposedly) originally meant people skilled at ...
2
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1answer
113 views

Is “he or she” offensive?

I was writing an email and a friend pointed out that I should stop using "he/she" and instead always use "they" to refer to a person of unknown gender, since "he or she" implies there are only two ...
8
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17answers
4k views

Insult for someone who “doesn't know anything” [closed]

How do you call/insult someone who doesn't know anything (meaning not the simplest/basic or obvious things)? Context: I need it in a dialog of the following form: A: How does <very simple/obvious ...
10
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4answers
362 views

Is there a term for words which are insults but not vulgar?

Sometimes, when I explain a new word to a friend who doesn't speak English well, I know that the word has to be used carefully, because it is not appropriate in all contexts, or can be offensive if ...
0
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1answer
137 views

is this answer rude? [closed]

recently some on in LinkedIn send a message to me: Thank you for connecting with me! I am recruiting for an Android Developer role (multiple levels) for a company whose product mostly likely impacts ...
3
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3answers
254 views

replacement for homophobic slang

(note: please read through what I am asking before taking offense and feel free to edit to make it less offensive) When I was growing up in the 70-80s it was common for kids to say things like oh, ...
3
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3answers
2k views

How bad is the use of “n***er” today?

If I call a Black person "nigger", how bad is this today? If a Black calls another Black with this word, is it wrong?
3
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4answers
1k views

Is the term Indian Giver politically correct?

My son is Cherokee & uses this term & I was concerned if that is a proper term. I thought it originated because the US government historically gave land & such to tribes, then took it back ...
1
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4answers
12k views

Is the word 'dumb' offensive?

Specifically, if I'm using it in a self-deprecating manner? As in, 'binge watching Netflix may be dumb, but it's my guilty pleasure.' My questions are: Has the original usage referring to deaf or ...
2
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7answers
4k views

Alternate phrase for “be damned” to avoid profanity

How could you rephrase something like this usage of "be damned" to avoid profanity, but without losing the emphasis conveyed by the idiom itself? I'm going to ask this question on StackExchange, ...
1
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0answers
82 views

Swearing: English or French? [closed]

This may not be the correct forum for the question, so I apologize if I'm merely cluttering the place up. Though I am far from fluent in French, I have spent enough time staying with family in Paris ...
16
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14answers
4k views

What is an informal term for a person who can't do anything right? [closed]

In Russian we have the term "рукожоп". I would translate it as "asshands" which literally means that your hands grow out of your behind and you can't do anything right (or do anything at all). ...
4
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3answers
18k views

What does “talk to the hand” mean?

I saw the phrase "talk to the hand" on many funny stickers which seems like expressing the idea that you want to stop the topic or conversation which you feel uncomfortable or not interested in. But ...
0
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2answers
132 views

What does “d-d” mean? Possible 19th century profanity?

I have several quotes of late-19th-century speech (by British men) which use the abbreviation "d-d" for a word. I'm not sure what it means, but from the context I assume this is profanity of some sort....
5
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3answers
928 views

“passf***ingport” is it a bad use of interjection?

I was just having a little conversation with a few friends, and I used the word ‘passfuckingport’ out of nowhere. I am not sure what it sparked - my Western friends where alright with it, but one of ...
3
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2answers
318 views

Why is a strange person called a fruitcake?

Fruitcake is an insulting word for someone who you think is strange or crazy (the Macmillan Dictionary). Why does the word have this meaning? What is the similarity between a strange person and a ...
-3
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2answers
61 views

Connotations of the word Triassic [closed]

Our company is planning to name a new venture as Triassic... and our user base is native English speakers mostly in the US and rest of the world. I wanted to check with native speakers does the word ...
9
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3answers
459 views

What, was the 'joy' of a hard bargain?

Quite by chance, I encountered the following in Sylva Clapin's 1902 A New Dictionary of Americanisms: Jew (to). The earlier editions of "Webster's Dictionary" contained the verb "to jew," and ...
38
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6answers
11k views

How did “Jew” become pejorative?

For some reason, the word Jew often carries a pejorative or offensive connotation, which the related adjective Jewish does not carry. This is most obvious when either word is used as an attributive: ...
-1
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4answers
199 views

a taboo slang word (solved) [closed]

Excuse me for the following, I don't want to offend anybody. But who could answer my question if not the native speakers? How should we know the depths of the culture with its mays and maynots? I ...
8
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3answers
7k views

Why isn't “it” used in place of “he or she”, “he/she”, “s/he” etc.?

There is a related discussion on this Q&A site. My question is different. I'm all for gender awareness, but why hasn't a properly defined pronoun "it" been used instead of "he/she" or "he or she",...
34
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6answers
86k views

Is there a difference between “arse” and “ass”?

From a comment here, in frequent usage, arse and ass are often interchangeable when used to refer to buttocks or to a person of dubious charms. However, although “to arse about” has a vague connection ...
1
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5answers
4k views

Is “monkey around” offensive?

Someone asked me for something and I said, "Do you need it right now, or do I have a couple hours to monkey around with it?" They got really quiet. While certainly unprofessional, is this also ...
45
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5answers
5k views

Who is Jesus H. Christ?

When used as an expletive, the name Jesus Christ often gets an H inserted into the middle of it for some reason. I've heard lots of guesses about what the H stands for, the most popular one being ...
1
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4answers
3k views

How to insult a Tory (or people holding a conservative viewpoint in general)? [closed]

I am writing a contemporary theatre play where one character - a senior businessman - first introduces himself as a not particularly conservative person. Later in the play, his protégé finds that the ...
2
votes
2answers
146 views

What is the origin of the term “bull****” in its figurative sense? [closed]

When/how did the word "bullshit" or the phrase "I call bullshit" (or its multiple variants) become acceptable in English? Was it a direct adaptation from another language or was it introduced in some ...
-1
votes
2answers
712 views

Difference between “vulgar”, “offensive” and “derogatory” [closed]

Why do we use the words "vulgar", "offensive" and "derogatory"? What are the differences between them? For example, on Wiktionary, if we look up "nigger". now offensive, ethnic slur, vulgar, see ...
41
votes
8answers
28k views

Alternative term to “Blacklist” and “Whitelist”

In short, my company is developing a management tool for managing SIM cards. One of the features of the tool is to block the SIM card if it's put into a disallowed device by device IMEI validation. ...
1
vote
0answers
135 views

Is 'sidekick' a derogatory term? [closed]

Is calling someone your sidekick offensive to them or is it just an alternate term for 'partner'?
-1
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1answer
225 views

Why is “n----r” considered extremely offensive while “n---a” is not that much?

Specially considering that they are pronounced similar if not the same. I know "nigga" is also considered offensive by a lot of people but I think on general terms, you're likely to offend more ...
1
vote
1answer
191 views

' I do think it will be a shame on your part ' - is it an accusation? [closed]

I was just having an 'email fight' with someone, since when I asked him to modify the terms of a call, he responded to me: ' I do think it will be a shame on your part as by not...', which I ...