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Questions tagged [offensive-language]

This tag is for questions about offensive language. It is for questions about words or phrases that could be considered offensive. If reason of offensiveness is belittling or painting a negative light instead of 'just offending' CONSIDER using the tag PEJORATIVE-LANGUAGE.

-3
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1answer
75 views

For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [on hold]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

What are the constraints on replacements of the phrase “Holy S—t”?

When my friend found out that the new season of Rick and Morty is going to be released this year, he yelled in excitement: Holy fucking Rick! This is not a valid (ie. grammatically correct) ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Is there a grammatically need to hyphenate the compound words “dumb f*ck” within a novel?

Would I leave the space, hyphenate it, or combine the two works like its similar, less aggressive counterpart: "dumbass" The quote from my novel is from dialogue "It's been six years, you dumb ...
0
votes
2answers
109 views

How do natives pronounce “what the f**k?”

When I hear native speakers, especially Americans say the phrase I expect a "th" sound in "the" but instead, it sounds more like a "t" or "d" sometimes. Am I correct or am I just hearing it wrong?
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Is the use of the word “cracker” as a racial slur so common that it cannot safely be used to refer to certain hackers? [duplicate]

I always liked to use the word "crackers" to refer to people who overcome computer software or security restrictions, as opposed to "hackers," which (supposedly) originally meant people skilled at ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Is “he or she” offensive?

I was writing an email and a friend pointed out that I should stop using "he/she" and instead always use "they" to refer to a person of unknown gender, since "he or she" implies there are only two ...
8
votes
17answers
3k views

Insult for someone who “doesn't know anything” [closed]

How do you call/insult someone who doesn't know anything (meaning not the simplest/basic or obvious things)? Context: I need it in a dialog of the following form: A: How does <very simple/obvious ...
10
votes
4answers
275 views

Is there a term for words which are insults but not vulgar?

Sometimes, when I explain a new word to a friend who doesn't speak English well, I know that the word has to be used carefully, because it is not appropriate in all contexts, or can be offensive if ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

is this answer rude? [closed]

recently some on in LinkedIn send a message to me: Thank you for connecting with me! I am recruiting for an Android Developer role (multiple levels) for a company whose product mostly likely impacts ...
1
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0answers
69 views

Swearing: English or French? [closed]

This may not be the correct forum for the question, so I apologize if I'm merely cluttering the place up. Though I am far from fluent in French, I have spent enough time staying with family in Paris ...
16
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14answers
4k views

What is an informal term for a person who can't do anything right? [closed]

In Russian we have the term "рукожоп". I would translate it as "asshands" which literally means that your hands grow out of your behind and you can't do anything right (or do anything at all). ...
0
votes
2answers
112 views

What does “d-d” mean? Possible 19th century profanity?

I have several quotes of late-19th-century speech (by British men) which use the abbreviation "d-d" for a word. I'm not sure what it means, but from the context I assume this is profanity of some sort....
-1
votes
1answer
102 views

Is it possible to bleep out words which are NOT profane? [on hold]

Is it possible to censor out non-profane words e.g. words about love, or something not to tell about? e.g. you are in love with someone but not to tell about it "I'm in **** with..." But, the ...
5
votes
3answers
891 views

“passf***ingport” is it a bad use of interjection?

I was just having a little conversation with a few friends, and I used the word ‘passfuckingport’ out of nowhere. I am not sure what it sparked - my Western friends where alright with it, but one of ...
65
votes
5answers
15k views

“Pregnant” as a taboo word

This recent article from The Sun states that the term pregnant, in this specific case referred to Meghan Markle, is considered vulgar by the Queen. According to a recently-resurfaced Us Weekly ...
3
votes
2answers
219 views

Why is a strange person called a fruitcake?

Fruitcake is an insulting word for someone who you think is strange or crazy (the Macmillan Dictionary). Why does the word have this meaning? What is the similarity between a strange person and a ...
-3
votes
2answers
58 views

Connotations of the word Triassic [closed]

Our company is planning to name a new venture as Triassic... and our user base is native English speakers mostly in the US and rest of the world. I wanted to check with native speakers does the word ...
-1
votes
4answers
185 views

a taboo slang word (solved) [closed]

Excuse me for the following, I don't want to offend anybody. But who could answer my question if not the native speakers? How should we know the depths of the culture with its mays and maynots? I ...
-1
votes
2answers
570 views

Difference between “vulgar”, “offensive” and “derogatory” [closed]

Why do we use the words "vulgar", "offensive" and "derogatory"? What are the differences between them? For example, on Wiktionary, if we look up "nigger". now offensive, ethnic slur, vulgar, see ...
2
votes
2answers
134 views

What is the origin of the term “bull****” in its figurative sense? [closed]

When/how did the word "bullshit" or the phrase "I call bullshit" (or its multiple variants) become acceptable in English? Was it a direct adaptation from another language or was it introduced in some ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Is the term Indian Giver politically correct?

My son is Cherokee & uses this term & I was concerned if that is a proper term. I thought it originated because the US government historically gave land & such to tribes, then took it back ...
1
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0answers
107 views

Is 'sidekick' a derogatory term? [closed]

Is calling someone your sidekick offensive to them or is it just an alternate term for 'partner'?
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votes
1answer
216 views

Why is “n----r” considered extremely offensive while “n---a” is not that much?

Specially considering that they are pronounced similar if not the same. I know "nigga" is also considered offensive by a lot of people but I think on general terms, you're likely to offend more ...
1
vote
1answer
144 views

' I do think it will be a shame on your part ' - is it an accusation? [closed]

I was just having an 'email fight' with someone, since when I asked him to modify the terms of a call, he responded to me: ' I do think it will be a shame on your part as by not...', which I ...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

Is this the correct usage of a vulgar and offensive phrase?

There is a funny LICENSE and in this license used an expression: You just DO WHAT THE FUCK YOU WANT TO as long as you NEVER LEAVE A TRACE TO TRACK THE AUTHOR of the original product. Is an ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Help in deconstructing a sentence [closed]

This was a question posed by a friend. I'm myself curious of the answer. I apologize for the explicit content (I left it as is to remove ambiguity). I pretty sure that 'a yuppy fu@k' is a compound ...
3
votes
3answers
243 views

replacement for homophobic slang

(note: please read through what I am asking before taking offense and feel free to edit to make it less offensive) When I was growing up in the 70-80s it was common for kids to say things like oh, ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Did word “beavis” mean anything before Beavis&Butthead series were aired?

In other words,why Mike Judge named one of characters "Beavis"? Was there also some slang meaning or word play behind it as in "Butthead"?
22
votes
10answers
8k views

In my native language, we have this obscene saying - don't take a dump in the barrel of honey

The implication is that one must not display a disrespectful behavior in regards to his/her friends or the people he/she knows very well, because as the honey in the barrel won't be edible anymore ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

What is a nice way to say “kicking ass”? [duplicate]

Often in a professional setting, I want to say "X has really been kicking ass (and taking names!)" Sometimes I say "kicking butt" but it doesn't have quite the same emphasis. I don't want to say ass ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Does the word fascist share a root with the anti-gay slur f****t?

My understanding is that the word fascism comes from fasces meaning a bundle of sticks and the slur also had the meaning of a bundle of sticks. Are we looking at false friends?
9
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4answers
975 views

“Foreign students” vs “International students”

An etymological doubt has hit me. To my surprise, the "writing enhancement software," Grammarly flagged the phrase "foreign students" and suggested "International students" in its place. The reasoning:...
3
votes
2answers
818 views

Why is it “to have sex” instead of “to sex?”

In English, there is no generally acceptable verb for someone to say the equivalent of "to sex." All our equivalents are either too vulgar ("to fuck", "to bang", "to smash") or too formal ("to ...
2
votes
1answer
838 views

What is the origin for “- the hell out of -”?

Sometimes expletive sentences contains these words, for example "I'll beat the hell/crap out of him"
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Is there a word for shaming people with low vocabulary? [closed]

I know there are synonyms for shaming like abashment but is there any specific word for shaming people with low vocabulary ?
22
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19answers
13k views

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____” [closed]

I am writing a poem for school. The verse with the word I need to change is this: 7 hours is too long In much too short a day You really don’t care if you get an answer wrong Because you don’...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

Is the name "KOON Bar“ offensive? [closed]

A friend of mine opened a bar named “KOON Bar” in Germany. The bar is in Kassel and Kassel is often named as raccoon city, because a lot of raccoons live here. So he was looking for a short version ...
59
votes
12answers
20k views

Is there a non-vulgar version of “pulled it out of their ass”? [duplicate]

Is there a non-vulgar version of “pulled it out of their ass” ? It's a useful phrase, but not one to be used in professional environments. For example: There is no way John’s projections for next ...
2
votes
1answer
136 views

Uniquely New York curses

This is kind-of an oddball question but the site rules don't appear to forbid it. If it somehow violates guidelines just let me know and I'll voluntarily take it down. I'm looking for region-specific ...
3
votes
1answer
445 views

What does “be buggered sideways” mean? [closed]

From the movie "Atomic Blonde" The main character, Lorraine, is briefed by her bosses about a secret document, the list, which can expand the Cold War for another 40 years, if Russians have it. If ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

'Colourful Language' with regards to swearing

Why is expletive laden, or coarse language often referred to as being colourful/colorful? Oxford Dictionaries define it, colourful 2.2 (of language) vulgar or rude. ‘colorful words usually ...
4
votes
7answers
7k views

What’s a non-vulgar alternative for “covering one’s ***”? [duplicate]

Oxford Dictionaries Online writes in their U.S. section that the phase cover one’s ass is an informal phrase meaning: Foresee and avoid the possibility of attack or criticism. ‘I like to ...
4
votes
1answer
114 views

What (if anything) is the difference between bullsh— and horsesh—?

Both bullshit and horseshit are used to mean nonsense or waffle, especially to cover up a lack of knowledge or unwillingness to inform. An old answer here describes them as near synonyms. If they're ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“Obscene yourself” (literally) in Hemingway's “For Whom The Bell Tolls”

I am reading Hemingway's "For Whom The Bell Tolls" (an edition from 1960). Throughout the book, strong words and obscenities are replaced literally by the term "obscenity" or similar. For example (...
1
vote
1answer
186 views

How rude is it to ask someone if they are a nerd or not? [closed]

I asked one of my new friends(a week), "On a scale of 1-10 how nerdy are you? Where do you fall?" She is from Chile and she said the question was very rude there. But I don't understand why. I only ...
4
votes
2answers
140 views

English can be a right dastard sometimes. Why not?

Bastard, meaning one begotten and born out of wedlock, is a very old word from Old French (earliest OED citation 1297). Dastard, meaning one who meanly or basely shrinks from danger; a mean, base, or ...
0
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3answers
185 views

More family friendly phrase for “always use your full ***”

There's a saying that goes something like: Never half ass anything. Always use your full ass. Is there another succinct way of expressing this in more polite language? I think there are a ...
10
votes
3answers
452 views

What, was the 'joy' of a hard bargain?

Quite by chance, I encountered the following in Sylva Clapin's 1902 A New Dictionary of Americanisms: Jew (to). The earlier editions of "Webster's Dictionary" contained the verb "to jew," and ...
19
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15answers
5k views

Derogatory term for people from places like San Francisco [duplicate]

I'm looking for a derogatory term for people from liberal metropolitain areas who think they are better educated and more enlightened than those from rural, conservative areas. Carthage, TX is to ...