Questions tagged [objects]

Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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27 views

Does the subject of a sentence have to be doing the verb? [on hold]

I was curious about the formal rules of using I and me in a sentence, and have learned that "I" is the subject pronoun and "me" is the object pronoun. However, I am still not clear on when it is ...
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1answer
34 views

“it” as object?

In a worksheet we had the statement "I love it here. Let's return next year." A student asked what "it" refers to and I'm not exactly sure myself. Is the "it" here a kind of dummy it?
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1answer
31 views

a relative pronoun/adverb as an adverbial

He collects some cars that are antique. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the subject of “are” here. This is the letter (that) my mother sent me. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the ...
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1answer
28 views

Help regarding the subject in a sentence

Could anyone please tell me what would be the subject in the following sentence which I have taken from the National Geographic website: Providing pools of water for frogs when other water is ...
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1answer
40 views

Object or complement with “have”

Take the following sentence: "He has blue eyes" Does "blue eyes" act as an object or a complemet? Would the answer be different in a sentence such as:
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1answer
42 views

That's What She Said Quote

Okay, I'm sure most of you have seen this T-Shirt before. But I got to thinking about it the other day. It is obviously a reference to the time-honored tradition of That's what she said in response ...
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1answer
65 views

How to use “neither” in second-person plural?

I am trying to say "Neither of you was my student", but placing myself as the subject, i.e. "I was neither of _____ teacher. I can't figure out what goes in the blank. "I was neither of your teacher" ...
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1answer
39 views

How to identify a phrasal verb + object from a verb + prepositional phrase

In sentences with the combination “verb + preposition + noun phrase” is there a procedure to identify whether it is a phrasal verb + object or a verb + prepositional phrase? or does it solely depend ...
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2answers
85 views

The semantic role of an object of a verb

I've posted a question in English Language Learners as to this sentence: Mom made me a sandwich. The intended meaning was "Mom made a sandwich, intending it for me." There, I came to realize that ...
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0answers
50 views

Odd sounding phrasal verb splits with specific pronouns. Are there rules? [duplicate]

Give the examples... A: Did you check it out? Did you check the book out? Did you check Netflix out? Did you check the recommendation out? Did you clean it out? Did you wipe it off? Did you log it ...
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0answers
68 views

Possessive pronoun/object pronoun + Gerund [duplicate]

I have been thinking about this for quite a while and have done some research on it. What I have learned is that possessive pronoun+gerund is a structure that's more "formal", while object pronoun + ...
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3answers
635 views

Identifying the subject: Should ‘who’ or ‘whom’ be used here?

Now, while I think I have come to terms with 'who' and 'whom', I read an article from Oxford Dictionaries that confused me: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/who-or-whom This article states ...
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1answer
223 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
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3answers
81 views

Direct and Indirect objects in “I take my kids to school”

In the sentence I take my kids to school. I would be the subject and the verb would be take. Now, as the verb take is acted upon the kids, I thought my kids was the direct object and the school ...
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1answer
86 views

Should a comma come before 'you' in this sentence?

I'm wondering whether a comma should precede the pronoun 'you' in the sentence examples below: That's not how the computer works, you fool. Thanks for the assignment tips, you saviour. Whenever I ...
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0answers
35 views

What is the trail of logic in the sentence

Consider the sentence You don't need to patronize me. To patronize is an infinitive. But I can't understand why use of me is right. Is it the object of the infinitive or of the need verb? Can an ...
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2answers
69 views

Word that means something despised, strongly avoided, or strongly disliked? [closed]

I know of many words that explain this feeling (abhorrence, enmity, etc for stronger examples) but what is a word that would be the object of these? As in, what word could be used as an object that ...
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1answer
28 views

What is this grammatical form called and how should punctuation be used

I am trying to find the correct punctuation for the following sentence: It allows connection to, and customisation of, functions available in the program. Does such construction, with two direct ...
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1answer
35 views

Object in a sentence

As for my knowledge, the object in a sentence is used to talk about the thing or person that the verb is done to or who receives the verb. For example : I put the orange cat into the garden. With ...
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2answers
979 views

Is the signature of a letter a subject or an object?

I want to sign a letter jokingly not by name, but by a personal pronoun. Is the signature a subject or an object? I feel like using object pronoun (me) sounds better, but why? The signature looks more ...
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3answers
2k views

Is it “George and I” or “George and me”? [duplicate]

Recently, at McCain's funeral Obama said: "After all, what better way to have the last laugh than to make George and I say nice things about him to a national audience." Is it "George and I" or "...
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1answer
55 views

If someone pleads guilty to a crime, can they be described as “convicted”?

If someone pleads guilty to a crime, can I then describe them as being "convicted"? I recognise that a person who pleads guilty to a crime will have a conviction on their record. The confusion ...
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1answer
62 views

Subject-matter of x, subject of x, object of x

Please help me understand the difference in meaning an nuance between the following phrases: Subject-matter of x (e.g. subject-matter of a book) Subject of x (e.g. subject of a discussion) Object of ...
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1answer
80 views

I am confused with usage about 'the' and object complement

Is the sentence as below correct in grammar? And is it clear enough? Please copy & paste keyword, mykeyword, into the search box of Google Play Store app or website to locate this pure app ...
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1answer
68 views

What is the structure in the sentence: “The reason scientists believe that…”

I have this sentence from one of my IELTS books: One of the reasons scientists think that there is a link between stress and cancer is the idea that there may be a cancer-prone personality At ...
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1answer
34 views

Dependent or Independent clause?

Is "The way people write has changed" an independent clause or dependent clause? In any case please explain in detail. What is the subject, verb and object if there is or if there isn't. Thanks in ...
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510 views

How to tell if something is a core complement or a non-core complement?

CaGEL on page 216 cite the following: "Kim gave the key to Pat" An NP indirectly related to the verb through the preposition is referred as an oblique. The phrase "to Pat" is a non-core ...
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3answers
48 views

Is is possible to say “Admit to something being something else”?

I was wondering if anyone could help me figure out whether the sentence below is grammatically correct or not. (is it okay to say admit to something being something else?) "The Prime Minister admits ...
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2answers
122 views

Can anyone help me to understand if the following sentence requires 'who' or 'whom'? [duplicate]

I am writing a story and would like to know which one is correct: a) "...and it was impossible to know who was sheltering whom." b) "...and it was impossible to know who was sheltering who." I ...
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1answer
432 views

Can you imagine Dad and I putting up with this? [duplicate]

In the questions "Can you imagine Dad and I putting up with this?" is the subject pronoun 'I' correct, or should it be 'me?'
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1answer
237 views

(raised) object or subordinate subject in catenative clauses

I have a question about objects/subjects in catenative clauses such as He told his daughter to tidy her room. I’ve found two main kinds of analysis of clauses such as these – those where his ...
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1answer
101 views

Can you say “Alone <object>”? [closed]

can you say for example: Alone Potato? I want to say that a potato is alone, like "look at that alone potato". I think lonely Potato is better right? But can you say alone potato also? Or is this ...
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4answers
65 views

How do you interpret “we can talk tea”?

On a package of tea I found a sentence as follows: If you have any questions, feedback or are not satisfied with this product, please contact us at our details below and we can talk tea. This ...
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6answers
2k views

If someone calls something by a wrong name, what are they actually referring to? [closed]

I was in an argument where an analogy was raised concerning animals often called by technically incorrect terms. Let's say the case in question was "panda bear". It became clear we were using the ...
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1answer
67 views

“One of the features that emerge” or “One of the features that emerges” [duplicate]

"One of the features that emerge" or "One of the features that emerges" Is 'one feature' the subject, therefore it emerges, or are 'features' the subject and they therefore 'emerge' ? I keep ...
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2answers
149 views

Dropping “it” in America

Before I embraced descriptive grammar it would really grind my gears when I heard, usually from someone with a US American accent, phrases like "I hate when that happens". "Hate is a transitive verb!" ...
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2answers
555 views

How to use apostrophe with plural object of preposition [duplicate]

Which apostrophe is correct? (There are multiple dogs.) One of the dogs' tails One of the dog's tails I believe it is the former but I'm not 100% certain. I found absolutely no guidance on ...
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1answer
37k views

“Name and I” or “name and me” when they are neither the object nor subject? [duplicate]

There have been many questions on this exchange about when to use phrases such as "John and I" vs. "John and me". The answer seems to be you that you use "John and I" when they are the subject of the ...
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0answers
138 views

The clause in “it is adjective that clause ” structure

{it} + {passive verb} + [that] + {clause} It + is said + that + Jesse Owens was one of the most important athletes of the 20th Century. "Jesse Owens was one of the most important athletes of the ...
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1answer
131 views

What is the meaning of “{plural verb} {plural noun phrase}” vs. “{plural verb} {singular noun phrase}”? [closed]

Do the following two sentences have the same meaning? The robots perform their mission. The robots perform their missions. In grammar-wise, are both correct? If not, what is the ...
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2answers
3k views

“Wish” in the Passive [closed]

If we make the subordinate clause in "I wish he were here" nonfinite we get "I wish him to be here", right? Can we then change the voice? What I mean is can "He is wished to be here" be grammatical ...
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1answer
256 views

What's the correct way to parse this sentence structure?

Consider the prototypical sentence: Let us get back to me watching TV. What's the correct breakdown of each piece of this sentence? I was trying to use this as an example of why the correct ...
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2answers
859 views

Identifying the verb(-phrase) and object in a sentence

What is the verb(-phrase) and the object in the following sentence: "Many of them were able to begin buying their own homes." Case 1: -verb(-phrase): were able -object (infinitive clause): ...
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4answers
134 views

What object am I referring to in this sentence?

I apologize if my question is too basic, my English is a little rusty and I have always had trouble with this concept: Consider the following sentence: Once I finished the project, I found that ...
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2answers
266 views

Meaning of “Peron” as used in Le Morte d'Arthur

I am unable to find a fitting definition for the word "peron" as used in Le Morte d'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory. The book uses many archaic words, but usually I am able to find the definition online ...
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1answer
590 views

How do I correctly identify the object in a sentence?

How do I correctly identify the object in a sentence? Here are two examples I am confused about. She rose from her chair. On a website, I read that this sentence doesn't contain any object. But I ...
2
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1answer
214 views

“You and I” - both subjects? [duplicate]

I was talking about this with a friend yesterday, though the actual example was "thou and I", which sounded weird. I thought it should be "thee and I", due to "I" being a subject pronoun. I eventually ...
2
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2answers
731 views

Participial Phrases As Objective Complement

Can a participial phrase be used as an objective complement? If so, is there a way to tell when the participial phrase is or is not used as an objective complement? How would this sentence be ...
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2answers
1k views

Thanks for checking this video out VS checking out this video [duplicate]

I heard both phrases in some YouTube videos and I am not sure which one's correct. Apart from the answer, could you tell me what I should be googling for in order to understand the grammar related to ...
3
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3answers
608 views

Does “Predicate” includes object, complement and modifiers?

I'm currently studying the "Sentence Structure" for the English language. I've found varied information in this regard. Some sources says that the sentence consist of five components: Subject + ...