Questions tagged [objects]

Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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19
votes
1answer
52k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" ...
11
votes
3answers
20k views

Hyphen or no hyphen when modifying an adjective with a quantity?

I have a sentence which has an object that is described with an adjective: We need to inform our interested patrons of this change. If I modify "interested" with "more" or "less", do I connect the ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“as bad at English as me” vs. “as bad at English as I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
7
votes
4answers
21k views

Using “there're” to abbreviate “there are” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “there're” (similar to “there's”) a correct contraction? Since using there's for a plural object would be incorrect, would it be possible to ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“They interviewed several candidates who/whom he thought had the experience he required.” [duplicate]

They interviewed several candidates who he thought had the experience and qualifications he required. My test prep book says this should be "who" because of the subordinate clause's predicate: ...
6
votes
3answers
739 views

Identifying the subject: Should ‘who’ or ‘whom’ be used here?

Now, while I think I have come to terms with 'who' and 'whom', I read an article from Oxford Dictionaries that confused me: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/who-or-whom This article states that ...
4
votes
3answers
7k views

Correct form of object of sentence with grouped possessive and personal pronoun?

Lets say the object of a sentence is a possessive, of more than one nouns. Something that is say both someone else's and my own. IE Tom's and mine, as in the sentence This meeting requires Tom and ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Word with -ee as a suffix

Is it correct English to be able to add the suffix -ee on to any verb to show the object of that verb? Ex: Abandonee is "one to whom something is abandoned" Observee is "one who is ...
6
votes
2answers
576 views

How is transitivity defined in CGEL?

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
12
votes
2answers
7k views

What happened first: “ye”/“you” merging to “you”, or “thou”/“thee” falling out of common use?

Simple subject "I": I went. Replacing it with "me": Me went. That sounds strikingly wrong. We use it for fake "caveman talk". However, there was a time when it worked like this: 1st person ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

How to tell if something is a core complement or a non-core complement?

CaGEL on page 216 cite the following: "Kim gave the key to Pat" An NP indirectly related to the verb through the preposition is referred as an oblique. The phrase "to Pat" is a non-core ...
-2
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3answers
2k views

sentence pattern clarification [closed]

I am really confused with indirect and direct objects ... I need to understand the sentence pattern for this sentence: He showed kindness to his parents.
13
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4answers
9k views

Can “shrugging” only be done with shoulders?

Please compare He shrugged. and He shrugged his shoulders. Is there anything else that can be shrugged, besides shoulders? To me it sounds like duplication when used in this way. I'm aware of ...
7
votes
3answers
892 views

“There is to be no drinking beer today” What is the status of “no” and “beer” here?

There's no doubting her sincerity. There's no telling what she's done. There's no guessing which way they'll bolt. There's to be no drinking beer today. There's no telling her. The word no is usually ...
5
votes
1answer
510 views

Object vs Subject?

Consider the following sentence: "Even during the simple occurrence of him and me standing next to each other makes me notice that he's taller than me." Is him and me correct? Should it be he and ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

To explain or to be explained

I have searched lots of websites to understand which one is correct in this sentence: It is too hard to (be) explain(ed). Some people say that after some adjectives called tough adjectives you can't ...
0
votes
0answers
1k views

Direct and indirect object with “give” and “buy”

I have been studying Longman's English grammar book, and something is really confusing me: We can put it and them after the verb: Give it to me. Buy them for me. Do it for me. With e.g. give and buy, ...
0
votes
2answers
420 views

Whom vs Who: object Judas + whom [duplicate]

The test itself lies in attempting to apply this new update to a card belonging to Judas, whom is a legitimate user of the system. Is Judas considered the subject or the object? I'm considering Judas ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Grammatically, what is “It” in the following sentence?

I'm currently working at a private academy in Korea, and my boss just asked me a real head-scratcher. In the sentence: It doesn't have to be hot and humid for players to lose too much water from ...
-1
votes
1answer
619 views

“Whom” or “who” where the referent is both subject and object?

I understand there has been so much on this topic but I am still confused. I get that if the person is the subject it is who and anything else is whom. However, I'm really struggling to work out this ...
7
votes
7answers
2k views

Is “door” the direct object of “The cat ran out the door”?

My friend and I got into a heated discussion about direct objects. While we both understand what they are and how they work, we got stuck on a random sentence that I blurted out. Now, if I say: "Mary ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“He who” as an indirect object [duplicate]

Is the following incorrect? Return it to he who gave it to you. Presuming it is, how would I correct it? (without resorting to saying "to the person who gave it to you," which is somewhat ...
15
votes
5answers
3k views

Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?

In this question, the questioner states I wonder the origin of the word. Can wonder take a simple object like that? Or should it be wonder about or wonder at or something similar (or something ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Are you comfortable with who(m) he is?

Are you comfortable with him? (correct) Are you comfortable with whom he is? (??) You're comfortable with whom he is. (??) Are you comfortable with who he is? (??) You're comfortable with whom?...
3
votes
3answers
823 views

Does “Predicate” includes object, complement and modifiers?

I'm currently studying the "Sentence Structure" for the English language. I've found varied information in this regard. Some sources says that the sentence consist of five components: Subject + ...
5
votes
0answers
511 views

When do I use “me” and when “I”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I put myself last? I get this mixed up so often. Should I say: Me and Rob are going swimming. or I and Rob are going swimming. I know the latter sounds REALLY ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Why do we say “who you were” and not “whom you were”? Isn't it the object of the verb?

I have a grammar which says that "whom" is used when it follow a preposition. E.g: to whom am I speaking. to whom it may concern. The grammar also says that "whom" is the object form of "who". E.g. ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there an object in this sentence?

You need to practise your proofreading. In this sentence, "you" is the subject and "need" is the verb. But is there an object? At the moment I am guessing that there isn't and that to practise your ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the “-ee” suffix changing in meaning?

Anecdotally, it seems that in recent years, the "-ee" ending for the subject of an action has become diluted and often stands for the agent of the action, rather than its object. Examples: ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

“…four others, one of whom responded.” Is “whom” correct here? Can I use “who” instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
3
votes
2answers
22k views

Subject and object while using passive voice [closed]

My English teacher and an overwhelming majority of my English class insists that in the following sentences the bolded words are subjects and the italicized words are objects. I ate the cake. The ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Direct object and indirect object in the sentence “Bill promised Mary to fix her car.”

In the following sentence Bill promised Mary to fix her car. Maybe I can write this sentence like this: Bill promised Mary (for Bill) to fix her car. Bill is the subject of the verb fix, and ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Yes, this is she. Who's calling? [duplicate]

I've read in a book that I should "use the subjective case if the pronoun is the complement of the linking verb to be". That is the following sentences are correct: They believed that the thief was ...
1
vote
1answer
359 views

Can a phrase be the object of a clause and how would its subject change? [duplicate]

Take the sentence: I speak all over to whoever will listen. ...at first blush, I thought, "Ah — whoever should be whomever." However, I then noted that in the phrase "whoever will listen", ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“The sky is blue” - Is it a clause?

In the expression The sky is blue, is the adjective "blue" an object? Is this a clause or a sentence at all?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Prepositional phrase Vs Direct object

I have seen the rule put forward that We need a direct object to form a passive sentence. The following sentences don't have direct objects according to some schools of thought, they have ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

The subject is after the verb in this sentence? [closed]

"Please hand me the comb." My textbook says to identify what 'me' is, I was able to do that for sentences in which the subject before the verb but I cannot do that for this sentence? I know that ...
0
votes
3answers
93k views

Which is the proper response to “I love you”? [closed]

When my wife says I love you, my natural response is you too, meaning “[I love] you too.” I realise that I’m in the minority here. I more frequently hear me too, but I don’t feel comfortable with ...