Questions tagged [numbers]

Questions relating to the use of numbers or numerals in English.

2
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0answers
86 views

“Sixty tray, all day” — what does that mean?

I've stumbled upon a very peculiar phrase in a comic I'm currently reading; here's the screenshot. As can be seen, just before exiting the train some gangsta guy quips "Sixty tray, all day" to a ...
0
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0answers
46 views

How do you pronounce N°1?

AMC is a french designation, and I have seen N°2 and sorts of things in many places: The official name however, assigned in 1931, is the AMC Schneider P 16. The P 16 was thus accepted as ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

How to write numbers and percentage?

In the sentence – Auditors recommend an increase of the allowance for bad debts by ten %. – should the percent sign be there or should the word percent be spelled out. Also should the number be ...
0
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1answer
51 views

What is the correct way to express a number with all its digits?

I have the following table: On the last column, I have expressed the numbers in billions as it is mentioned at the top. However, I want the last number (Final sample size) to be expressed fully. Is ...
0
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0answers
12 views

When to write numbers in digit and in words in a sentence [duplicate]

I've always had this problem of getting a little confuse when to write numbers in digits and when to write numbers in words. Which is more appropriate? 10 teachers attended the meeting. or Ten ...
1
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2answers
55 views

How to properly use numbers in text (special case)? [closed]

I'm writing a scientific thesis about my program. I want to write the number of responses of a questionnaire that I have developed but I don't know what is the best in this case. Example 1: "We ...
29
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4answers
4k views

Why are two-digit numbers in Jonathan Swift's “Gulliver's Travels” (1726) written in “German style”?

I have been reading "Gulliver's Travels" (Otherwise known more verbosely as "Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of ...
1
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2answers
60 views

Is there an equivalent to a 'quarter' for twelfths?

I've heard of quintants, septants, octants, and quandrants, but I can't find a word for a sector of a twelfths. Any ideas?
0
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1answer
30 views

Plus sign before or after hyphenated word

Let's say there's a set of buildings with differing numbers of units in each. I would like to describe them as two or more unit buildings. Writing it out with the number, would I write "2+-unit ...
5
votes
2answers
135 views

Were days ever written as ordinal numbers when writing day-month-year?

I know that the day is written as a cardinal number (1, 2, 3) and not an ordinal number (1st, 2nd, 3rd) in the day-month-year and the month-day formats. But was there ever a time when ordinal numbers ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Is there a name for all numbers different than zero?

The names for the number 0 include "zero", "cipher", "null", "naught", "nought", "love", "duck", "nil", "nada", "zilch", "zip", "o", "aught", and "ought". There are various subtleties of usage amongst ...
0
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0answers
25 views

What we should write in roman for ordinal numbers? [duplicate]

As we write 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th what we should write in roman for the same way?
0
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0answers
16 views

How to ask about something which of the first, the second, the third. etc the thing is? [duplicate]

I know the question itself sounds strange but I cannot think of a better wording. I will provide two examples below: (1) 13 is the sixth smallest prime number; how would I ask someone about 13 so ...
1
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0answers
16 views

Plural vs Singular when the number 1 is represented in integer vs decimal form [duplicate]

If I have a noun of cardinality 1, I am taught that I use the singular form. E.g. I have 1 Apple If the value is still 1, but represented as 1.0, do I still use the singular form? E.g. I have 1.0 ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

When to use 'the amount of' and not e.g. 'increase physical exercise' / 'increase the amount of physical exercise'?

When do you need to use the number of or the amount of with a noun? For example, "If people go to gyms more, they will increase their physical activity." OR "If people go to gyms more, they ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

What term predated “even” when referring to numbers?

Had this posted on the Linguistics stackexchange, and was pointed here as a more appropriate spot to ask. In doing some poking around in etymologies, I noticed that while "odd" in the sense of "odd ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Hundreds of times higher?

Is it correct to use the expression "hundreds of times higher" when the difference is 3.08 - 3.85 times higher? This is coming from Twitter, someone said that there was an increase of "hundreds of ...
1
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0answers
94 views

Why are there are so many words for “zero”?

Null, nil and naught are all synonyms of zero, and to my knowledge, zero is the only number that has this many cognitive synonyms, if not more. Why is this? Does it have to do with English being ...
0
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2answers
92 views

How to write numbers concerning physical quantities?

Is there a rule specifying how one should separate thousands in numbers? Should I put a comma in this phrase, “500–1500 ohms”, so it would become “500–1,500 ohms”? If so why?
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Apostrophe Use In Abbreviated Decade Which Is Also A Possessive

I always put apostrophes before abbreviated decades. Ex: The '60s. However, what if you want to abbreviate a decade that is also possessive of the word that comes after it? Ex: Classic dance genres ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Measurements - how they should be written in a list

Which is correct? a. Images were obtained at a distance of 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mm from the bottom of the plate. b. Images were obtained at a distance of 4 mm, 8 mm, 12 mm, 16 mm and 20 mm from the ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Is this an acceptable way of writing the count of items in a sentence?

My father served in the logistics branch of Indian armed forces and he had a very particular style of representing the number of items of a certain object. For example, he would use this sentence: ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Beginning list items with numerals

Most well-known style guides dictate that numbers should always be spelled out at the beginning of a sentence (Forty-seven percent of people...), even to the point of recommending rewriting to avoid ...
1
vote
1answer
204 views

How do ordinal suffixes work with mathematical constants and other non-Arabic numbers?

This question was inspired by a tweet from the FakeUnicode Twitter account, a semi-novelty account sharing various examples in the wild of bugs, glitches and other unintended results from improperly ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

“The number of steps is infinite” or “The number of steps is infinity”? [closed]

In a mathematical paper about random-walks. Which is more correct: "The number of steps in the random-walk is infinite" or "The number of steps in the random-walk is infinity"?
2
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3answers
176 views

How do you pronounce “103rd”?

The number 103 can be pronounced as “One hundred and three” or “One o three”. Can “103rd” be pronounced as “One hundred and third” or “One o third?” (Especially in referring to a name of a street, ...
1
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2answers
174 views

What would be the correct way of writing 10⁻³⁶ second into words?

I tried Google, and I couldn't find the answer, so I have to have ask this question here. Is this correct? one millionth of a billionth of a trillionth of a second. I can write one 'undecillionth' ...
7
votes
7answers
5k views

Can I say eight-gon, nine-gon and ten-gon instead of octa-, nona-, and deca-gon?

As a non-native English speaker I struggle with Greek prefixes. Am I allowed to use just normal English numbers in place of them? Is it natural? Or do I have to learn how those Greek prefixes work at ...
3
votes
3answers
217 views

How would you say “0.4 - 1g?”

Assuming I don't want to say "zero point four grams to one gram," would it be: "zero point four to one gram" or "zero point four to one grams" or neither? I'm leaning towards the second one ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Are Only + Number Adjectives?

In the sentence "Only eight apples grew on the tree." Are both "only" and "eight" adjectives?
1
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3answers
114 views

Term for a “unit-ed” (versus “unitless”) quantity

What is a term for the class of measured quantities that have a unit, as distinct from those that are unitless? This term describes any quantity with a unit: 5.3 seconds $0.00 −17.28 metres 4½ ...
3
votes
5answers
961 views

How infrequent is “a non-zero chance”?

I misinterpreted the expression “a non-zero chance” as an emphatic way to stress that there was no possibility or likelihood of something happening. there is a non-zero chance that they will pay ...
5
votes
1answer
253 views

Use of degree symbol for Latinate ordinal number shorthand

I remember often having professors in college use degree symbols to write shorthand versions of Latinate ordinal numbers. For example: 1° Primary 2° Secondary 3° Tertiary 4° Quaternary ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

numbering from up to down

I want to translate a sentence from Persian to English, the sentence I want to say is "the children should tell numbers from up to down and conversely" but I am not sure does it correct?
1
vote
3answers
102 views

Should you use a comma after a number that falls at the end of a clause, even if the number has commas in it (ex: 1,000,000)?

For example, in the sentence The cost is anticipated to be $1,000,000, inclusive of pre-construction costs. is it appropriate to use a comma after $1,000,000 or should a semicolon be used?
1
vote
1answer
554 views

How to read Figure xx.x or Section xx.x

I wonder that whether there is a special reading way pertaining to American or British. For example, Figure 12.3 shows a paused video touched on in Section 2.10 with the width, height, and ...
43
votes
11answers
11k views

When did “a buck” start being used to mean a unit of 100? (E.g. “a buck fifty” for 150 lbs.)

Before you answer, please note: I'm only interested in when this usage was established in common (American) parlance. I know what the term means and I don't need it defined, nor do I require an ...
1
vote
2answers
598 views

Has “N times less” become commonplace? [duplicate]

I've heard more and more people saying "A is N times less than B" in many contexts. I even saw in a news journal (forgot whether it was Time or Newsweek), "The object was 3 times closer than the ...
0
votes
1answer
843 views

Why does “No” mean “Number?” [duplicate]

I frequently see the abbreviation "No" to mean "Number" (or "Nos" to mean "Numbers") instead of the much more common meaning of the word (a negative statement or denial). Sources cited here say it's ...
1
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0answers
200 views

Why does “zero of one qualifications” sound better than “zero of one qualification” even though you only have one qualification? [closed]

Of the two phrases: zero of one qualification zero of one qualifications Because one is singular, it should be qualification without the plural suffix ‑s. But for reasons I cannot explain, to me ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Numbers” or “number?” Which sentence is correct?

Which sentence is correct? Why? In 2000, the number of Vietnamese students studied in Russia and France was around 3 million and 3.5 million respectively. In 2000, the numbers of Vietnamese students ...
0
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2answers
40 views

Should the word before a numeral be capitalized

If you type out week 1 or top 25 matchup, would the word before the numeral be capitalised?
2
votes
1answer
703 views

How to speak the line number? [closed]

What is the most common way to identify a particular line of code in a talk or lecture? On the seventeenth line of this code" On the line seventeen of this code" On the line number seventeen of this ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Numeration in policies [closed]

Is numeration in policies obligatory or optional? I create different policies as per GDPR for internal use and have an idea to skip the numeration because of redundancy, can I do this? I know, it ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

Is there a standard way to read “30+”?

I have just come across the following sentence: Our team has cataloged 30+ [design patterns] across various areas of the framework so far. I have often seen the pattern "number + plus sign" to ...
1
vote
1answer
163 views

Is it essential to use comma in a big number?

Is it necessary to use comma in a big number? For example, if anyone writes one million four hundred thousand and two as 1400002 instead of 1,400,002 on answer sheet of listening section of IELTS test,...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

In written English, do you write fractional inequality with a percent-plus or a plus-percent? [closed]

In written English, which of the following is the correct way to convey I have a greater than or equal to ninety percent success rate according to all measures? I have 90%+ success rate across ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

Why do distributive adjectives mostly take a singular noun while quantitative adjectives mostly take a plural noun?

I am sure that there are some exceptions to this, but I have noticed that distributive adjectives like “each”, “every”, “either”, “neither”, etc., mostly take a singular noun, while quantitative ...
0
votes
2answers
140 views

What part of speech is 'point' in the phrase 'nought point five'?

What grammatical evidence is there for allocating the word point to a particular part of speech in phrases like nought point five or nine point nine nine, where these phrases would represent the ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

What is the standard way to number rows in a table?

First of all, it is not quite a language specific question but I do not know a better place to ask. Suppose we have a table, say something like this. What if I want to add a column which contains ...