Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
11
votes
2answers
10k views

Use (or non-use) of articles before abstract nouns

I know I have asked a similar question before but this time I have examples taken from COCA and they do puzzle me. I would love to hear explanations from native speakers. The following (incomplete) ...
9
votes
3answers
79k views

What's the difference between the words “journey”, “travel” and “trip”? [closed]

As they always were interchangeable in an article, I just want to know the difference.
36
votes
8answers
62k views

“Trainer” is to “trainee” as “mentor” is to what?

What do you call someone who is being mentored? Is it mentoree or mentee? Does the term student or pupil imply a context outside the business environment?
11
votes
1answer
1k views

When can a noun be used attributively?

Nouns can modify nouns: cat food, coffee cup, gold ring, laser surgery, flood insurance. It seems to me there are even cases where a noun sounds better than the corresponding adjective: sociology ...
19
votes
3answers
62k views

Is there a term for words that have identical singular and plural forms?

Is there a term for nouns that have identical singular and plural forms? For example, sheep fish glasses aircraft/spacecraft etc.
17
votes
14answers
25k views

Word for people who live in the same city

What are the people who live in the same city are called? Any words for that? I want to use it in the following context: I and my ____ are happy.
12
votes
3answers
23k views

Is “man” the opposite of “woman”?

I heard someone today say that lad is the opposite of lass. And we picked up a debate on whether woman is actually the opposite of man, which led me to question whether nouns can have opposites at all....
10
votes
9answers
7k views

Is there an English word meaning “the use of uncommon words”?

Is there an English word meaning "the use of uncommon words" or similar?
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Irregular plurality situations in English

Why do some nouns in English not take the plurality suffix in the plural form? Could you give me a list of plural nouns which don't take "-(e)s" suffix? For example, I know about "fish" and "sheep".
11
votes
12answers
6k views

Is there a single noun in English for 'jerry-rigged?'

Gambiarra in Brazilian Portuguese means a device, solution, or means to an end made impromptu, usually in a sloppy way and lacking care. I was wondering if there was a single word in English for ...
8
votes
5answers
689 views

Hypernym for “clients”, “members” and “partners”

We're building a feature for a website and trying to think of a hypernym for clients, partners and members so that the feature remains generic enough for re-use later on other websites.
23
votes
5answers
6k views

New Zealand pronunciation of “women” vs “woman”

I have read in a number of places that the NZ pronunciation of "women" must be rather peculiar. Quoting from just one such place: For some years I've noted the tendency of Kiwis to pronounce "woman"...
7
votes
8answers
27k views

A good noun for a two-faced person

I'm in need of a word that describes someone who has two personalities (they don't necessarily contrast each other, good/evil).
6
votes
3answers
907 views

Which comes first: cat or dog?

Which comes first in a sentence? I know some word pairs such as bacon and eggs, where bacon always comes first. E.g: Make me bacon and eggs for dinner, honey. Cats and dogs are the two most ...
40
votes
16answers
370k views

One word for someone who doesn't care about anything

A pessimist is someone who always considers negative outcomes of a situation, whereas an optimist always considers the positive outcomes. Is there a word for someone who, in any given situation, doesn'...
27
votes
7answers
140k views

Is “yesterday” a noun, an adjective or an adverb?

Are words like "yesterday" and "tomorrow" considered nouns, adjectives, or even adverbs? I'm getting mixed signals from several references. In a case like "I have an important meeting tomorrow," it ...
66
votes
24answers
14k views

Is there a word for a non-geek?

I am looking for a term which clearly defines somebody as a non-geek, without being derogatory. The best example I have seen is muggle, but it needs context to be understood, as in "You don't meet ...
39
votes
5answers
80k views

Why is the spelling of “pronounce” and “pronunciation” different?

Why is the spelling of pronounce and pronunciation different? If one originally did not know the spelling of pronunciation, one would when hearing it verbally deduce its spelling to be pronounciation, ...
16
votes
2answers
36k views

Is there any difference between “color” and “colour”?

What is the difference between color and colour?
14
votes
3answers
216k views

“Thanks and Regards” vs. “Thanks and regards”

I am almost certain that the R in regards must be in lower case because it follows a conjunction and is therefore a part of the same phrase/sentence. But I've been seeing a lot of emails of late that ...
11
votes
2answers
96k views

Why can't we say “informations”? [closed]

Why can't we use the word information in the plural form? "Give me all the informations you've got", even if it's wrong, sounds more beautiful to my non-native ear than "give me all the information ...
26
votes
3answers
7k views

Why don't English nouns have grammatical gender?

English nouns — other than those with natural gender, e.g. people or animals — do not generally have grammatical gender, and so are referred to as 'it' rather than 'he' or 'she'. However, modern ...
15
votes
1answer
38k views

Politics: singular or plural?

Which is correct, "politics is out of scope" or "politics are out of scope?"
10
votes
8answers
84k views

“Advice” vs. “an advice”

I have often heard that advice is uncountable and shouldn't be prefixed with an article. So I often force myself to say "a piece of advice". But I've seen it used with an article on a number of ...
4
votes
4answers
193k views

“One of my friends” vs. “one of my friend” [closed]

Which of the following is correct? Yesterday, I met one of my friends. Yesterday, I met one of my friend.
10
votes
2answers
56k views

Is “performance” singular or also plural?

When I have to use information and performance I'm always confused. However, I'm asking whether when I'm referring to more than one piece of information of performance I should use "information/...
35
votes
4answers
4k views

Why do verbs end with “oke” while their corresponding nouns are written with “c”?

I was wondering about this for a while now. Could anyone explain this phenomenon or is it just "English quirks"? Examples: invoke/invocation provoke/provocation revoke/revocation
11
votes
11answers
52k views

A word for clothes, shoes, accessories?

I'm looking for a word that applies to all the things a person can wear, e.g. clothes, shoes, accessories, etc. It musn't be too generic, e.g. product, item, etc.
10
votes
6answers
25k views

'Home' in 'Ben and Jen went home.' Can an adverb be a noun at the same time?

In this sentence: Ben and Jen went home. Is home both an adverb and a noun?
6
votes
6answers
55k views

“Pupil” or “Student”, what is the correct use?

I'm German and we distinguish between "Schüler" (pupil) and "Student" (student). When reading English news articles, and I read the words "student" or "students", most of the time the articles seem ...
8
votes
3answers
202 views

Is a dark polka dot necktie dark?

In The Syntactic Phenomena of English, McCawley considers the phrase "a dark blue necktie", and concludes that "blue" in that phrase is simultaneously a noun and an adjective. It modifies the noun ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the term when you ask a question which implies a lie?

I remember there was a thread here on English.SE this month where someone explained this, but I can't remember how it was called. An example: Where have you stolen this product? This question ...
7
votes
9answers
35k views

In which parts of the USA do the say “soda” or “pop”?

Depending on where you go in the world, some people will refer to a carbonated beverage as "soda" while others choose to use the term "pop." For example, "Can I get you a soda" vs. "Can I get you a ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Is it common to use the borrowed noun-adjective form for borrowed French phrases?

Lately, something has struck me. I've been hearing several expressions in English, some clearly borrowed from French and preserving their noun-adjective form. Some examples are: Attorney General ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“sufferings” is plural though it is uncountable,but how?

We know that there is no plural form of the "uncountable noun," but, for example, we write: His sufferings force us to retain pity for him. Is it possible to make an uncountable noun plural? If so,...
0
votes
1answer
276 views

Why is the noun “brush-off” hyphenated when the verb “to brush off” is not?

I'd like to know the reason for the punctuation of the noun "brush-off" and the verb "to brush off": they have related meanings, but "brush-off" is the result of "to brush off", essentially. But one ...
6
votes
3answers
475 views

How can one determine if the opposite of an agent noun exists?

We know that the employer employs the employee and that the tutor tutors the tutee, but how do we know if the shooter shot the shootee? Is there a simple way to determine if an agent noun can be made ...
6
votes
4answers
5k views

Are there nouns that are always plural — have no plural counterpart?

Are there words that have no plural counterpart, because they are, in fact plural? Words like rice or scissors come to mind.
3
votes
9answers
49k views

One word noun for “rule-follower”

I'm looking for a single word noun that would perfectly summarize the stereotypical nerdy uptight virgin student council president. Basically, a more proper version of the slang word "square": a ...
2
votes
2answers
291 views

“Car sale” vs “Cars sale”

I have always thought that the latter: Cars sale, is incorrect; yet Google returns almost the same number of results for both! My concern is about Rule extraction and Rules extraction to be precise; ...
0
votes
5answers
14k views

Generic term for songs, movies, TV episodes, etc

For the model of a software project, I need a generic term that is abstract enough to encompass a single song, TV episode, movie, audiobook, etc. The word content comes to mind, but it is plural. The ...
23
votes
10answers
94k views

English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”

Is there an English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日), which means the sunshine filtering through the leaves of a tree (or trees)? It is made up of three kanji and the hiragana particle れ. The first ...
92
votes
12answers
189k views

What is the difference between an Emperor and a King?

I was at a loss when I was asked recently by my grand-daughter who is a school girl about the difference between Emperor and King. She asked me why Great Britain has King and Queen, while Germany and ...
42
votes
3answers
32k views

Bracket vs brace

I found the terms bracket and brace used interchangeably. Is there a difference, and what is it?
62
votes
2answers
134k views

“Content” or “Contents”?

Content or contents — when do I use which form? I realize that the one is the plural form of the other, but they seem to be used interchangeably.
33
votes
8answers
93k views

“Toilet”, “lavatory” or “loo” for polite society

My friend is trying so hard to fit into polite society, and is raising her child to say loo rather than toilet. I know it should be lavatory (and I would not say lav) but we are in the 21st century ...
20
votes
3answers
94k views

What is the difference between “clothes” and “clothing”?

Do some google I find that clothes work like objects like: You should pack your clothes. → Yes You should pack your clothing. → No Can you tell me the main difference between clothing and ...
10
votes
3answers
76k views

Why is the plural of “quiz” spelled with double Z?

The plural of "quiz" is spelled with double "z" while the plural of "box" (and sometimes "bus") is spelled with a single last consonant. Why is it so? Is this the general rule to double the last ...
21
votes
4answers
68k views

What is the noun for someone who receives a referral? [closed]

When a referrer (noun) gives a referral (noun) to another person, what is the term (noun) used for the recipient of the referral? "The referred" may work, but am I missing another term? "Referred" ...
18
votes
7answers
5k views

Why “be king”, not “be a king”? [duplicate]

I've heard people say "be king" (as in "I can't wait to be king") in movies and TV. Why don't they say "be a king"? Which is correct?

1 2 3 4 5 14