Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

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7
votes
1answer
2k views

Hyphenating “steady state” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it appropriate to use a hyphen? I am unsure if and when to hyphenate steady state (in a mathematical context), i.e.: We now calculate the steady-state concentration ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

What is the subject of a survey called?

For example, the subject of an interview is an interviewee. So, I was wondering what the subject of a survey might be.
4
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2answers
8k views

Using multiple verbs with multiple nouns

In a sentence which uses multiple verbs and multiple nouns, is there a way to logically show which verb corresponds to which noun(s)? E.g.  1. I like to buy and eat fish and chips. (Both ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Noun for adjective “reservable”?

In English, is it correct to use the term 'reservability' for the ability to reserve a room? Or is the term 'bookability' preferable? Or anything else? Context: I'm translating a room reservation ...
3
votes
4answers
4k views

Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?

Is there a single-word category for the status Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors? I've heard it called as "batch status" but can't seem to find the right single-word category for it.
2
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4answers
810 views

Is “time” needed in this sentence?

I must remember to bath within ten minutes time. Is the word "time" needed in this sentence, or is it superficial? Is it even wrong to remove it?
5
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3answers
220 views

What did Petrucci mean by the book title 'Wild Stringdom'?

His book name is "Wild Stringdom", I don't understand... — what is it? I'm from Russia and I speak English very bad. I want to translate this book for me into Russian.
15
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7answers
42k views

What's the difference between a vicar and a pastor?

What's the difference between a vicar, preferably of the Church of England, and a pastor? I browsed Wikipedia, but most of the gist of the article is that vicar is an ecclesiastical office, and oft-...
2
votes
1answer
681 views

Why I remember a wrong sense of the word “moron”? [closed]

I thought that the word "moron" means a very smart person (a genius), but my English teacher has said it means the opposite (an idiot) and it was confirmed by lexicons. Where did I get this incorrect ...
11
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4answers
3k views

Meaning of “magazine” from 1845

My wife and I were reading Institutes of the Christian Religion by John Calvin, translated into English in 1845 by Henry Beveridge, and we came across this phrase in the first book, chapter 5, section ...
7
votes
2answers
9k views

To use “test” as an adjectival noun, is the proper form “test” or “testing”?

When I write a document, I am confused when to use test or testing in my document. For example, which one makes a better statement below? A test engineer vs A testing engineer software test tool vs ...
0
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2answers
95 views

Marathon Event Question

How can I describe the marathon event more make sense? Assumed that I want to describe an marathon event: Item: full, half. or Category: full, half; Or Dis: full, half; or Group: full, half; Which ...
4
votes
3answers
6k views

“Amount” vs. “quantity” in generic?

It seems like both are used when referring to generic nouns: Product: name price amount total ---- ----- ------ ----- or, Product: name price quantity total ---- ----- -------- -----...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Are the words “network packet” and “network package” interchangeable?

"packet" and "package" are synonyms when we refer to mailings, but does the same apply to "network packet"? My co-worker frequently says: "network package". It's like nails on a chalkboard to me, but ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “it is a fun game” correct?

"It is a lot of fun," sounds correct, but not, "it is a fun game." Isn't fun a noun? Then why is it used as an adjective? I have heard this usage even by literary giants, so this cannot be a common ...
6
votes
9answers
22k views

What's the right word for “unclearity”?

My dictionary tells me that there is no such word in English. So, what word would you substitute for unclearity below (please, don't change anything else): — There is still something not clear to ...
0
votes
1answer
418 views

Expanding “science” and “diligence” usage to direct object

I seem to have seen these phrases: to do science to do due diligence quite a bit in recent years, and they sound funny to me; I wonder whether this usage of "diligence" and "science" as ...
7
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5answers
4k views

Etymology of “snob”

Some dictionaries mention an origin involving shoemakers... But I can't say the link is straightforward, really.
3
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4answers
688 views

“Did it go down your *muffler*?”

I read a narrative where the author was talking about her childhood. She said that one day she and her father, a brother and a sister were inside the car, the kids were eating popcorn and drinking ...
4
votes
1answer
857 views

Does “verdure” also suggest “a condition of health and vigour”?

I've known the meaning of verdure as "lush greenery" all my life. But now, it seems (according to Merriam-Webster), it also signifies a condition of health and vigour. Can anyone point me to a ...
5
votes
1answer
8k views

“Distinction” or “difference”?

I don't really know whether I should use "distinction" or "difference" or something else! My sentence goes like this: For a better distinction among them, people were given nicknames, which ...
2
votes
2answers
719 views

What's the difference between “abbreviation” and “abbreviature”?

What's the difference between these two words, abbreviation and abbreviature?
4
votes
1answer
5k views

What's the difference between “image” and “glyph”?

What is the difference in meaning between image and glyph? Both terms are used in programming IDE to represent a picture that will be drawn. I'm confused since sometimes these terms used alongside ...
5
votes
3answers
12k views

What is the difference in meaning and usage between the words “topic”, “theme”, “subject”?

I'd like to get a feel for the difference between these words. When are they interchangeable and when is only one of them appropriate or preferable?
3
votes
4answers
249 views

Must an “accident” evolve from human error?

I've been censured for calling the nuclear plant incident in Japan a "nuclear accident". I've never exclusively reserved the word accident only for those things which evolve from or are precipitated ...
2
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3answers
5k views

Answer or solution to an exercise?

In the context of the word exercise, e.g. in a textbook, is it more common to say answer or solution?
1
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2answers
2k views

“Mortals” vs “Human Beings”

There is a book titled Running for Mortals. I didn't recognize word mortal. Then I looked up it and get the meaning as below. mortal N - A human being I wonder, is mortal widely used as human ...
4
votes
1answer
12k views

Why is “I” capitalized in the English language, but not “me” or “you”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized? I realize that at one time a lot of nouns in English were capitalized, but I can't understand the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Possessive of Queen's? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Possessive of a word that's already possessive? I ran into this issue today. Referring to Queen's University, how would you say "I've been accepted to Queen's MA program?" ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

How to use “in” or “on” with nouns?

I'm always confused by this and can't find it anywhere. Here's an example of what I mean: (literature here in context of academic literature, such as journals, proceedings, etc.) In the literature ....
1
vote
1answer
115 views

Stone in the middle?

When I read a Children's Illustrated Dictionary, I found an example sentence as this, Apricot An apricot is a soft round fruit. It has a big stone in the middle. How to replace the stone with ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

What to do if a sentence ends with “Yahoo!”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to handle a name that includes an exclamation point (or other punctuation)? Just like the title of this question. I was reading an article about CAPTCHAs on Wikipedia and ...
30
votes
2answers
3k views

Why don't we use the indefinite article with 'software'?

Generally, one doesn't use the indefinite article with a noun because it's plural, but sometimes you get nouns where, for some reason, the indefinite article isn't used even though the noun is ...
5
votes
2answers
80 views

Owner vs. operator of a machine

The owner of a machine may be a company, while the person operating a machine (push buttons, feed material, etc) may be an employee of said company. But is the company also the operator of the ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Contraction for 'are' with nouns

Is this correct? the candys 're in the box, the womens're at the car I know 'you're', 'we're', 'they're' are valid usages, but can it be used for nouns?
4
votes
2answers
242 views

How well-known is the word 'wheelie'?

I'm curious how popular the word 'wheelie' is among native speakers. I'm a foreign citizen and came across it accidentally. For the curious, wheelie means when you maneuver your bike/bicycle to roll ...
3
votes
1answer
195 views

Educational course nomenclature

I am looking for a noun to describe an individual meeting of a course, as in a course of study at a university. Class is not an option in this case. Thoughts?
4
votes
2answers
249 views

Is “a disclaiming” a gerund?

EDIT see end of question for updates: The question came up if this is proper English: Sorry, I felt the need for a disclaiming for some reason. And I think it is but some others say it isn't. I ...
1
vote
2answers
243 views

Question on Champagne

The meaning for Champagne, which one is better? I found both in different reference books. A white sparkling wine. A sparkling white wine. :-)
0
votes
1answer
262 views

Periodical vs Issue?

I found issues were used on some websites like "$1 an issue". (Some magazines.) But I found another word periodical was used on my vocabulary book as follows: The periodical is published every ...
4
votes
1answer
337 views

Usage on farewell remark

I found several forms of farewell remarks like these: Goodbye Good-bye Good-by Bye Bye-Bye Are these remarks equivalent in both written and spoken English ?
8
votes
3answers
784 views

Usage of word “meat”

I am not a native English speaker and never lived in an English-speaking country, so I wonder how you would apply this word. Would you apply the term "meat" to the following things? Muscle tissue of ...
6
votes
2answers
13k views

Difficulty v. difficulties

Which form of "difficulty" should I opt for in the following sentence: They have immense difficulties easily accessing the texts. or They have immense difficulty easily accessing the texts. I ...
2
votes
3answers
743 views

Loops vs Laps for runner?

When I read some events map, I found loops used wildly. But some equipment watches like Timex used laps. What's the difference, how can I use them correctly? Please also give some sample if possible.
8
votes
1answer
17k views

Is “pain” a noun or a verb?

For example, which of the following sentences is correct: My eyes are paining. There is a pain in my eyes.