Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

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1answer
44 views

What is the correct verb here? Is or are?

Example: “In the performance category is the/are the/there are: 1) Al-Taghrooda, a traditional Bedouin chanted poetry 2) Al-Ayyala, a traditional performing art 3) Al-Azi, a traditional recital
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5answers
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Technical term for “cityglow”

I've been racking my brain (and Googling with every search term I can think of) to remember a word that describes the glow in the sky above a city (actually, any large source of artificial light, but ...
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2answers
62 views

Can you say two nouns are in apposition if the second one only refers to part of the first?

My daughter is teaching students at an Academy in the UK, i.e. at High School level, but is setting ambitious targets for grammar and writing. One topic she is developing materials for is Nouns in ...
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1answer
65 views

What is the plural noun for a group of people who registered to a website through a referral code?

I found that the "referred" is for a single person, I want to know the plural noun.
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2answers
100 views

When to add “the” before noun

E.g: "Reference of the actor who is granted access" vs "The reference of the actor who is granted access"? Should we put "The" at the beginning of the sentence?
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5answers
942 views

I found a reference to ‘naysmith’ in a work of science fiction. Is anybody familiar with the term?

I could not find any references to ‘naysmith’ as an actual historical term. Following is an excerpt from the book ‘Horus Rising.” ‘Then it occurs to me, Garviel, that only a weapon which questions ...
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0answers
34 views

How do you call a person who sees his work in everywhere

How do you call that person who's so crazy about their work that they see it in everything? For example, there's a girl who's a grammar teacher. And when she reads a novel, she always explains ...
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0answers
31 views

What is the best way to disambiguate a tabletop game and a game of one a these games

In the context of writing a computer program to play multiple tabletop games, I need a way to disambiguate in the code the tabletop games, and an instance of it (a game of a game, if I may say). I'm ...
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0answers
37 views

New words with Apophonic plurals

I was wondering if new words or neologisms have been formed with apophonic plurals such as; foot->feet mouse->mice goose->geese I am not searching for nouns that were influenced by the i-mutation ...
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1answer
52 views

Difference between adjective and gerund - he loves playing

He loves playing In this statement - is playing a noun(gerund) here or an adjective? According to me it should be adjective as it telling additional information about the subject ("he" here).
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1answer
69 views

What are those who await something called?

I was wondering what are those who await an incident or a person called. For example, if this is the original text: "I am one of those who await the return of Jesus Christ" and I want to turn it ...
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1answer
109 views

“She looked at me, impressed” in search of another word for impressed

She looked at me in _________ [noun implying impressed]. But this isn't how I want to word it. What I want to write, is, "Her eyes widened as her eyebrows raised and she drooped her bottom lip in [...
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0answers
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Is there any cultural connection between the English slang term “horny” and the Italian slang term “cornuto”?

The Italian word "cornuto" can be defined as: (adj.) possessing horns/having the qualities of a horn, and (noun) cuckold/one who was cheated on. The English word "horny" can be defined as: (adj.) ...
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4answers
11k views

Difference between “bunch of” and “group of” with regard to people

What are the contexts for using a bunch and a group when describing a handful of people? Please take both spoken and written English into account. For example, when is it more appropriate to use "a ...
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1answer
841 views

“Royals” vs “Royalties”: Which is the correct usage?

Two different headlines below and I would like to know which is the correct use of the word here: "Royalties draw line in the sand on Islam" "Royals draw line in the sand on Islam" Below is the link ...
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2answers
280 views

Use of chief as equivalent of boss

According to the OLD, the noun chief can be used for a person with a high rank or the highest rank in a company or an organization. However, while it of course appears in CEO and other job ...
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1answer
51 views

What is the grammatical name and function of the highlighted expression

What is the grammatical name and function of the highlighted expression in the sentence below: We attended the wedding ceremony
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1answer
50 views

What does “uberbond” mean?

I am reading the following article: Nelson, T., Maxfield, S., & Kolb, D. (2009). Women entrepreneurs and venture capital: Managing the shadow negotiation. International Journal of Gender ...
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8answers
4k views

Why is it “materials science” instead of “material science”?

Does anyone know how the "s" at the end of "materials" in "materials science" came about? It seems like "material science" would be equivalent, and is more natural to say aloud. For comparison with a ...
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9answers
19k views

When is it correct to capitalise 'earth'?

At the beginning of a sentence is obvious. I'm referring to the following examples: A handful of earth. The earth under this house. The earth beneath my feet. What on earth? The heavens ...
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4answers
5k views

Does adding the suffix “ality” to a noun change its meaning?

I thought that -ality was used to turn an adjective into a noun : bestial to beastiality, final to finality. But I see that some people add it onto the end of nouns : criminal to criminality, ...
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6answers
21k views

What's the origin of the word “geezer”?

From Oxford Dictionaries: geezer noun 1. a man (British informal) he strikes me as a decent geezer 2. an old man (North American informal , derogatory) I think in British English the ...
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2answers
160 views

If I name my child Mathematics, will I become the father of Mathematics? [closed]

Firstly, I'm a male. Secondly, this was a troll but I took it seriously: As a proper noun (the child), yes. As a (?) noun, no. I'm not a grammarian, so my reasoning maybe flawed. I am looking for ...
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5answers
2k views

Closest English term for Spanish “merienda”

The Spanish word merienda is often included in lists of untranslatable words. It originally meant the meal you had around noon between breakfast and dinner, as that meal used to be small compared with ...
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3answers
358 views

Can one use 'man' like one can use 'woman' as an adjective?

As a consciously feminist act so that women are not reduced to their reproductive capacities, the word 'woman', which is generally accepted and used chiefly as a noun, is used in place of the word '...
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3answers
306 views

Noun for the act of withholding?

Merriam gives me "withholder", which is indeed a noun, but not for the act. Sample use in a sentence: "Even private schools have some contact with the outside world, preventing the withholdment (...
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4answers
13k views

A person who is trying to impress somebody

What do we call a person who is trying to impress somebody (not necessarily to gain any advantage). For example, he buys them expensive products, always talking in a sweet manner etc. To describe an ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “an archives” correct? If so, is it an exception or are there others like it?

A friend recently posted a photo he took of a sign at the LBJ presidential library that used the word "archives" as a singular noun. According to a Smithsonian Institution Archives blog post, this is ...
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5answers
107 views

Is there a verb meaning to accompany a superior person to help him/her through out his/her travel?

I tried to find the verb for the action of a person traveling along with a superior person (in rank or age) to help throughout the journey. I couldn't find out one. Example: Jack _____ his mom to ...
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11answers
69k views

Is there a word for “people who are computer illiterate”?

Just as there is "computerate" to describe those who show familiarity with, and ability to use computers, is there a word to describe the opposite, those who are computer illiterate? The word I'm ...
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1answer
440 views

Why is the noun “blacklist” (written without a space) in the dictionary, but not “whitelist”? [closed]

Checking Oxford Dictionaries Online, I find the noun blacklist, written as one word, and the noun white list, written as two. There is no black list defined as a compound written open, and there is no ...
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0answers
37 views

Conjuring is listed as a noun on Google and Longman but then why does it appear as an adjective in the examples listed at these places?

E.g., on Google, the meaning is: "the performance of tricks which are seemingly magical, typically involving sleight of hand." But the given example is: "a conjuring trick". Similarly, the example in ...
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0answers
60 views

A noun or an adjective for “No matter which religion you belong to you will be accepted”

Whether the sacred thread across the chest or the Qur'an in arms. The Lover is (a) _____, neither a Hindu nor a Muslim! Whether he is wearing the sacred thread, or the Quran is in his hands; love is ...
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2answers
189 views

How is 'compound noun' defined in CGEL?

This question is specifically about The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Huddleston and Pullum. Here's CGEL's definition of word: In order to avoid possible misunderstanding we will ...
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1answer
486 views

Use of quotation marks after 'it's called X' and similar? [duplicate]

I've been looking at the Oxford Dictionary's page on inverted commas, and see that they use this example: He called this phenomenon "the memory of water." This seems like it would work with or ...
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3answers
22k views

Why is the plural form of “house” not “hice”?

The plural of mouse is mice, and the plural of louse is lice. Why is the plural form of house not hice? According to Merriam-Webster, the word house is already longer in the language, just as mouse ...
10
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3answers
85k views

Why is the plural of “quiz” spelled with double Z?

The plural of "quiz" is spelled with double "z" while the plural of "box" (and sometimes "bus") is spelled with a single last consonant. Why is it so? Is this the general rule to double the last ...
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1answer
74 views

Can anyone please suggest a single word which represents the quality of a person who can turn an obstacle into an opportunity

Can anyone please suggest a single word which represents the quality of a person who can turn an obstacle into an opportunity. The person will be strong even in the worst situations and will convert ...
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2answers
713 views

Collective name for source and target

The context: I have 2 databases. The source database where I retrieve data and the target database where I insert data. What is the collective name I can use for source and target in this context? ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Attributive or Possessive noun: the Dell Company's staff. or the Dell Company staff? [duplicate]

In the following is it better to use a possessive noun with an apostrophe or an attributive noun without an apostrophe? The following list details the assumptions that have been made in ...
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7answers
171k views

What is the difference between “house” and “home”?

What are the differences in meaning between house and home? When do I use one or the other?
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1answer
42 views

Is there a noun for an intentionally simplified task?

Similar to "dumbed-down" but a noun, with a stress on the ease of task execution. E.g. "The manager asked for expedited reviews of contributions because he wanted the project to be a(n) '-----'"
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1answer
215 views

The traditional grammar term for 'nominals'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 329) has a section titled 'Nominals': Intermediate between the noun and the NP we recognise a category of nominals: [3] a. the old man b. that book ...
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1answer
94 views

Unconventional capitalisation becoming the norm

Having now been involved in the writing of quite a few proposals as part of my job, I've noticed what seems to be a de facto convention: what I would consider common nouns or common noun expressions ...
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2answers
459 views

Pluralization of species names

Can you please guide me should we pluralize "painted stork" and "black-tailed godwits" in this sentence? Is there any rule regarding the names of species? Like which sentence makes ...
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0answers
44 views

Combination of different types of nouns results in which pronoun?

When I combine a noun that refers to a person and another noun, do I use whom or which? Like in the following simple example. Jesus was crucified because of Caiaphas and the Roman Empire, whose (/...
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2answers
43 views

What is the French phrase (or hyphenated word) for describing frivolities?

I am trying to think of a particular term that is used to refer to the frivolous, inconsequential activities of the rich and idle. I keep thinking of "fee-fees of the rich" for some reason, but ...
3
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1answer
126 views

A possible Spanish origin for “lunch”

I have recently discovered the words of José María Pemán from 1941 regarding the origin of the English word lunch. My translation (sorry): Wellington's Englishmen arrive in Spain, they fall in love ...
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2answers
76k views

“Slice” vs “Piece”: when to use which? [closed]

I'd like to understand when I should use "slice" or "piece", for example: "He's eaten three slices of pizza, and two pieces of cake". Why do I have to use "slice" with pizza, but "piece" with cake? ...
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1answer
66 views

Just, a noun. (?) [closed]

I can't seem to find an answer to whether the adjective "just" has ever been used as a noun in the history of the English language.

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