Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
1answer
79 views

“She looked at me, impressed” in search of another word for impressed

She looked at me in _________ [noun implying impressed]. But this isn't how I want to word it. What I want to write, is, "Her eyes widened as her eyebrows raised and she drooped her bottom lip in [...
3
votes
1answer
146 views

Use of chief as equivalent of boss

According to the OLD, the noun chief can be used for a person with a high rank or the highest rank in a company or an organization. However, while it of course appears in CEO and other job ...
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Writing and learning [closed]

What is it which makes life happy. Please find out error and explain the error.
7
votes
2answers
8k views

In English, are words like 'English,' 'Monday,' and 'January' considered common nouns or proper nouns?

In English, are names of languages (English, French), days of the week (Monday, Sunday) and months of the year (November, January) considered common nouns or proper nouns? I know they're all ...
4
votes
2answers
87 views

How do you say the total amount of time that has been spent in a job position?

I'd like to know what's the best word to describe someone that has been in a certain job position. For example, if I was hired in January and now it's March, my _______ (word I'd like to know) is 3 ...
1
vote
0answers
97 views

Word which means inevitably successful

I am looking for a noun which means inevitably successful or bound to be a success or ultimately successful.
0
votes
1answer
65 views

What is the singular form of fennel?

If I have one fennel bulb, what do I call it? What is the singular form of fennel?
6
votes
3answers
959 views

Geographical Usage of “Mate”

I was wondering where the term, "mate," is most popular? When I think of the term, "mate," I think of Australia and England, but I was wondering if anyone else has some input on this. Mate here is ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

What is the name of an entry in an index?

What is the name of an entry in an index? For example, an element of a taxonomy is a taxon and elements of a taxonomy are taxa. What is the equivalent for an index?
1
vote
1answer
27 views

hyphenated noun

I am proofreading a text and I am not sure if I should hyphenate the following noun. We are considering limits in which, without going into details, something happens to different objects, A1, A2, A3,...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Word for 'an event automatically happening earlier than planned, caused by something else'?

How would you call an action (or event) that occurs earlier than originally planned, in reaction to some condition or other event happening? Examples: When you put a pan on a stove with a timer, ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Police officer working undercover as an inmate

Is there a term for a police officer or someone else working for a country's security forces who masquerades as an inmate and is put into a cell with a suspect in order to extract information? I'm ...
13
votes
14answers
8k views

Single word for “refusing to move to next activity unless present one is completed.”

A perfectionist is defined as follows: a person who refuses to accept any standard short of perfection. But I am looking for a noun which describes a person who refuses to move forward in an ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

What is the term for “overlooking words with letters written in reverse”?

If I recall correctly, there is a term in English which refers to the phenomenon /behavior where people are unable to tell, at a glance or when skimming through an article, a misspelled word because ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

Looking for nouns that describe someone who doesn't ascend/go to heaven

I'm currently looking for nouns that describe someone who won't go to heaven or someone who was given an opportunity to move on but refused. I'm currently writing a novel that involves fallen angel ...
40
votes
6answers
160k views

Difference between “invoice” and “bill”?

I am talking about something you should pay. "Invoice" here doesn't mean the proof of payment. Sometimes I am told to pay my "bill", and sometimes they may refer to the similar paper (physical or ...
1
vote
3answers
66 views

synonym for a “request to join”

Given a group of people and a person, if the group asks the person to join, the group "invites" the person, or sends "invitation." If the person requests to join the group, what is a word (preferably ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

Why can't a count noun denote a class when used alone without any determiner?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 335) says: A count noun denotes a class of individuated entities of the same kind. Boy, for example, denotes the class of boys. For example, in ...
2
votes
1answer
171 views

what you call a person living in a safe house

What would you call the person that lives in a safe house, to save them from a much worse situation, say a person seeking freedom, escaping violence. The text I am translating refers to the African ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

What is the subjective inverse of “invite” or “invitation”?

If you are about to do something and you ask someone to join you, you "invite" (verb) them, or send them an "invitation" (noun). But, in the opposite direction, if they ask to join you, what verb or ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

What is another term for co-worker but for someone ranked higher?

What is a term for a director of a program (or anyone ranked higher) that I don't directly report to, but I've worked with on various committees?
1
vote
1answer
47 views

pronouns before nouns

I have this sentence: "Tilly laid down in the center of the room, arms under her head and eyes closed serenely." Do I need pronouns before the nouns ie "Tilly laid down in the center of the room, her ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

“I saw you doing something” [duplicate]

Apologize that I know there are many similar questions but I am still not satisfied with them so asking a new question here. For example, there is a sentence like "I saw you doing something". Non-...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

Can “removal” mean to move **to** a different place in contexts other than furniture, etc.?

The OLD includes the following meaning for the noun "removal" in British English: an act of taking furniture, etc. from one house to another Is the use of this noun with a similar meaning in ...
3
votes
4answers
9k views

'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

“Weigh benefit(s) against risk(s)”

Both nouns can be either a count noun or a mass noun. I think individually benefit tends to be used countably more than it appears as a mass noun. We list the potential benefits (count) of a thing. ...
7
votes
2answers
4k views

Is “surroundings” a plural noun or a mass noun that just happens to take the form of a plural?

I personally interpret “surroundings” as at least a plural-only noun but possibly just a noun whose plural form is much more common than its singular form in modern usage. But on a forum I frequent, ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Test subject but the subject is an inanimate object

I'm looking for a synonym(?) for ‘test subject’ that is applicable when the subject is an inanimate object. I've tried using the thesaurus looking for synonyms of 'test subject' but it's only ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

“interactible” or “interactable”

I came across this when developing a computer system in an object-oriented way. That is grouping data and functionality which relate to each other into objects and give those objects names. Now, ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Use of quotation marks after 'it's called X' and similar?

I've been looking at the Oxford Dictionary's page on inverted commas, and see that they use this example: He called this phenomenon "the memory of water." This seems like it would work with or ...
7
votes
4answers
768 views

Is “latte” a countable noun?

I have learned that liquids are uncountable, except for measurements such as "three cups of water." So, does "three lattes" in this context refer to three cups of latte?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Capitalization of programs

In the following sentence, which words would be capitalized? The Clean Parks and Rivers program was overseen by senior elders, the Hunter Valley Advisory Council, and Acme Inc's regional program ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

how to justify the “rough and tumble” used in this sentence?

Our clothing is designed to take the greater "rough and tumble" that they expect boys to give it. This is clearly an attributive clause. What baffles me is that the "it" used in the end. If " rough ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Is the repetition of a pronoun instead of stressing it possible?

In English it is usual to stress a personal pronoun or a noun so as to introduce a departure from the preceding spell of conversation in which is mentioned another agent in relation to the same ...
2
votes
6answers
118 views

Noun opposite of a theoretician?

What do you call someone who is concerned with / active in practice and application rather than theory? That is, what is the noun opposite of "theoretician"? I've looked on thesaurus.com, WordHippo....
0
votes
0answers
55 views

What is correct name to use when referring to a person who is hosting an online call?

I am thinking about few alternatives: host, facilitator and chairperson. What would be the correct name? Maybe there are some better alternatives?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it really OK to use “spend” as a noun?

Lately I keeping encountering "spend" used as a noun. For example, in the brochure for a piece of software: "See your employee spend", meaning the amount of money your employees are spending on ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Aviation, what is the equivalent word for ships instead of aircraft?

From Dictionary.com: a·vi·a·tion noun the design, development, production, operation, and use of aircraft, especially heavier-than-air aircraft. military aircraft. If aviation is the ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Word or term for contentment, balance, wellness, good health, at home

Looking to uncover a word or term that embodies this spirit, but is not so literal. That evokes a sense of “what is it”, what will I discover in the place. A place to achieve this sense of well-...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Is there a noun for “someone who has access”?

I'm building a data model for a computer program, and I'm in need a noun (a short compound noun is acceptable) for "someone who has access". The information will be provided as an answer to the ...
-1
votes
1answer
46 views

What is a word for a mixed-species group of animals?

We have words like flock, gaggle, herd, and bevy for groups of animals of the same species. Is there a word for a group of animals of mixed species? Something like, "I have a [word] of geese, goats, ...
5
votes
1answer
324 views

What does “lassar” mean in “The Most Dangerous Game”?

In the short story "The Most Dangerous Game" (1924) by Richard Connell, Zaroff says I hunt the scum of the earth: sailors from tramp ships—lassars, blacks, Chinese, whites, mongrels—a thoroughbred ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

What noun should I use when I want “seekability”?

This is programming lingo and apparently not a word in the dictionary and so I would like to be able to solve "this problem" with only dictionary primitives. (If you allow me to speak that away.) A ...
2
votes
2answers
50 views

Word/phrase to describe a behavioral condition where a little bit of effort kills motivation [closed]

There's a name of a psychological condition/behavior/phenomenon to describe the fact that a small increase in the difficulty of a task will prevent a person from doing the task at all. It stems from ...
0
votes
2answers
29k views

Is it correct to use “helps” as the plural form of the noun “help”? [closed]

I've heard some people use "helps" as the plural form of "help". Is that correct? Or are there any exceptions?
1
vote
1answer
34 views

“Personal Use Program” or “Personal-Use Program”?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
3
votes
5answers
13k views

“Particulate” vs. “particle” [closed]

What’s the difference between particulate and particle? Should it be diesel particulates or diesel particles, and why? Could you provide three or more examples where it should use particulate rather ...
4
votes
4answers
15k views

What is the word for the corner where ceiling and wall meet in a house?

In a square room in a house, what is the word for the corner where one of the walls meets the ceiling? I kept thinking it was a word like "eaves", but that turned out to be the overhang. I have ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

When do we use this construction? Auxiliary verb + subject + verb

I was trying to find some info about this construction but couldn't succeed, although I happen to encounter it here and there almost every day. So the construction is: auxiliary verb + subject + verb. ...
14
votes
10answers
33k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...