The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

132 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is “x” used as an abbreviation for some nouns?

This question is related, but is not a duplicate, of Why do some words have "X" as a substitute?. I have noticed that a few nouns can be significantly abbreviated with an "x" at the end. ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

What is the word for students under the same advisor

I'd like to know what is the word to describe students under the same advisor in graduate program, e.g. PhD program. Normally, students in the same department who attend the same classes are called ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

Nouns which change meaning in question/statement form

Most questions, when converted into statements, retain their overall "meaning", i.e. the statement is asserting what the question is asking. Question: Can you grate the pears? Assertion: You ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

What does an operative operate?

I’m trying to come up with a word which describes the thing an operative operates upon. That is, the target of the operation. For example, if a surgeon operates on a patient, and a chauffeur operates ...
2
votes
0answers
76 views

Can the phrase “once more” be a noun in American English?

Can the phrase "once more" be a noun in American English? I'm wondering if it can, as the two Japanese online dictionaries I'm using for my translation of 今一度 both say that the entry, -which only ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

Is there a technique used when someone splits a compound noun into two parts?

My student has asked whether the splitting of the compound word keyhole into key hole is a particular literary technique. I didn't know! It's relevant to the text, as it is about disconnection and ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

Is there currently a shift from -nce word endings to -ncy word endings?

This is something I think I've noticed, but maybe I've just been noticing odd word choices and putting it down to a shift in language use. Has anyone noticed a shift from people using verb-derived ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

Is there a name for the substitution of “the + singular noun” for a plural noun?

For instance, I might say, "Overcrowding is a major concern in the classroom today" rather than "Overcrowding is a major concern in classrooms today". Is that substitution a literary device? The ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Noun is a noun (terminology)

Is there any particular term for when we use one noun to describe/define another. Karl is a teacher Pigeons are birds. Basically, the format being “x is y”. Is there a name for the concept,...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Use of chief as equivalent of boss

According to the OLD, the noun chief can be used for a person with a high rank or the highest rank in a company or an organization. However, while it of course appears in CEO and other job ...
2
votes
0answers
865 views

When to use “-er” vs “-or” as a suffix in verbs - a comprehensive example (a developer's perspective)!

It's been many times when it comes to decide whether to use "-or" or "-er" as an agent noun suffix to a verb. My native (mother language) is Greek, and I'll try to provide you a way to think before ...
2
votes
0answers
414 views

Rules on noun+noun structures

Although there are plenty of grammar topics that I occasionally struggle with, there is one that causes the most trouble. Lately, I have been writing a lot of technical instructions and manuals, in ...
2
votes
0answers
102 views

“the rustle of tires” vs “the rustling of tires”: pompous or not, is there a rule, or is it random?

Scene: high school. Time: the present. A teacher went through a student's essay in which an out-of-the-way house in the sticks was described. It (the house) sat in the middle of a picturesque grove, ...
2
votes
0answers
108 views

Difference between 'gain optimization' and 'gains optimization'

What is the difference between gain optimization and gains optimization in a financial context? I want to know in particular if one of those terms is better English, or if they have different ...
2
votes
0answers
508 views

When did 'street', 'road', etc. start being capitalised?

Old newspapers and books seem to very rarely capitalise (and often hyphenate) phrases like "High street", "Herbert-road", and "Trusting lane". These days, we capitalise "Street", "Road", and "Lane". ...
2
votes
1answer
127 views

What do you call an area where people can pick up flyers/pamphlets?

What do you call an area/corner where people can pick up free flyers/pamphlets/brochures? Sometimes they're on catalog stands and sometimes they're just in stacks on a table. My non-native speaking ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

'Lots' as a noun or quantifier with ellipsis?

I'd like the opinion of the community on the status of lots when used in the following: Your tutor will be an experienced teacher from whom you can learn lots. Is lots here still a quantifier or ...
2
votes
1answer
997 views

Gerund vs noun— which to use in title

This issue of gerunds vs noun always puzzled me and in this particular case made me wonder. I actually am translating my thesis title into English and am not sure as to use gerund or noun. So which ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Is the Canadian in 'That's the Canadian in you' an adjective or a noun?

That's the Canadian in you. Is this Canadian a noun or an adjective? To clarify the fog, I asked 92 to 96 native speakers residing in the U.S. for the acceptability of the following three sentences. ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Brave or bravely?

I am translating a text from English to my own language. This is the context, my question is about the sentence in bold. My question is about the interpretation of a word. If we did not find ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “Additionals” a word?

Google Translate recognizes it as a noun, but search with it and Google suggests me to use additional instead. Is it a recognized word? As in My order came with a list of additionals that were ...
2
votes
2answers
129 views

Is there a name for words like Terror in “The Tomb of Terror”?

I know that Terror is a noun, but is there a name for a noun that's used to describe another noun like this?
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Army of Soldiers vs Troop of Soldiers

Which of the two is correct ? Is anyone wrong ? Troop: 1.soldiers or armed forces. 2.a group of soldiers, especially a cavalry unit commanded by a captain, or an airborne unit. AND Army : ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Word that means “something that can be abbreviated”

The two answers that spring to mind are "abbreviable" and "abbreviatable," however neither of them feel correct. Searching the Internet has yielded no conclusive results - dictionaries seem to contain ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

What is the name of this type of adjective?

Okay, I've been wondering this for a while. There's a specific type of adjective, and it seems to me that it should have a name, but I'm not sure if it does. It's the class of adjectives that can be ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Is there an “-onym” for “group names of animals?”

Psuedonyms are false names. Synonyms are similar names Antonyms are opposite names. There are also aptronyms, homonymns, eponyms, demonyms, and retronyms. Is there an "-onym" that applies to ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

how to justify the “rough and tumble” used in this sentence?

Our clothing is designed to take the greater "rough and tumble" that they expect boys to give it. This is clearly an attributive clause. What baffles me is that the "it" used in the end. If " rough ...
1
vote
1answer
419 views

How would you call a person who posses a certificate?

I am building for a client online certification application. Person will complete a short training (few slides) and after that the person will get the certificate proving completion of the "course". ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

What are the rules for what “they” refers to when there are two plural nouns in a sentence?

Some examples: The Wilsons are angry at the Smiths for the way they parked their car. The Wilsons haven't hated this Smiths this much since they moved. The South hasn't hated the North this much ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Word/phrase to describe a behavioral condition where a little bit of effort kills motivation

There's a name of a psychological condition/behavior/phenomenon to describe the fact that a small increase in the difficulty of a task will prevent a person from doing the task at all. It stems from ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

“Personal Use Program” or “Personal-Use Program”?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Expression for a very specific utility post climbing gear called “maneas”/“pretal” in spanish, widely used in South America

IMPORTANT, first just watch 30 seconds of 1 or 2 of this YouTube videos featuring the use of "maneas", to visualize this devices: 1,2,3,4, don Pictures 5,6 I know this site is not spanish oriented, ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

A possible Spanish origin for “lunch”

I have recently discovered the words of José María Pemán from 1941 regarding the origin of the English word lunch. My translation (sorry): Wellington's Englishmen arrive in Spain, they fall in love ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Digits (location/position) vs. digits (glyph/symbol/value) on a display?

This is about (numerical) displays, eg. a "multiple-digit" display such as a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven-segment_display (LED or LCD) and the difference between a digit as a single-glyph ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Comparing infinitives and nouns

I'm wondering whether it's grammatically correct to compare an infinitive with a noun using 'than'. For example: "Does he like to play in band better than gym?" she asked? I don't hear much usage of ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Is “You were going to <noun> and <verb>.” grammatical?

In the song "An English Teacher" from the musical "Bye, Bye Birdie," Rosie sings to Albert You were going to NYU / and become an English teacher. I would parse this as You were (going to NYU) and (...
1
vote
1answer
940 views

Synonym for “follow-up” meaning the most experienced waiter as a noun

I used to work for a restaurant that had waiter teams. There were three roles: Aid, Lead, and Follow-up. The Aid was basically the busboy. The Lead greeted the customers, took the drink orders, got ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

Is “monthly shipment” a compound noun?

I am wondering if "monthly shipment" can be considered a compound noun. I think it cannot, but what made me less certain was having seen "monthly ticket" listed as one in a grammar site. Thank you in ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Is there a logical basis to the distinction between nouns and adjectives? Or can any noun function as an adjective (and v.v.)?

In logic, the predicate calculus makes no distinction between "it is human" and "it is a human". Should we?
1
vote
0answers
32 views

What is the grammatical breakdown of phrases such as “fair of face”, “strong of mind”?

The components of such phrases are: adjective + "of" + noun. Could you refer to the adjective as the qualifier of the noun? Or the noun as the object of the adjective? Is there one grammatical term ...
1
vote
0answers
756 views

Identifying Appositives and Nouns in Apposition

I am having some trouble discerning appositives from their nouns in apposition. Consider an example from the Wikipedia article on appositives, "My friend Alice Smith likes jelly beans." "My friend" ...
1
vote
0answers
3k views

On leave / On a leave

I know one should say: "I was on leave" and not "I was on a leave". Can you explain why? How should you say: "He took a leave" or "He took leave"> Thanks.
1
vote
0answers
515 views

What are the other synonyms of Persona?

I learned the word from my UX team. They do this exercise where they put users into different buckets based on their characteristics and behavior. These buckets are called Personas. What are the ...
1
vote
0answers
89 views

Word which means inevitably successful

I am looking for a noun which means inevitably successful or bound to be a success or ultimately successful.
1
vote
0answers
202 views

“Because you do it” Noun clause?

Is because also used to form noun clauses? - Check this example: Because you did it doesn't mean that I like you Is that right? If so, could you provide me more examples of noun clauses with ...
1
vote
0answers
159 views

is there a term for when you use two words with a slash in between to label something?

If I used the label religiosity/spirituality, would it be called a compound label or something like that?
1
vote
0answers
124 views

Are there significant differences in how “college” and “university” are used in syntactic constructions?

To me (an American), "what to study in college" sounds acceptable. Meanwhile, "what to study in university" sounds wrong. This suggests that these words have different grammatical attributes. This ...
1
vote
0answers
113 views

How do you tell if the description of an abbreviation is a proper name (and thus capitalized)?

I work in tech, so I'm continually running into terms that aren't standardized in a dictionary. This is the one in question: Change Data Capture (CDC) When defining an abbreviation such as CDC, it ...
1
vote
0answers
70 views

Which form of the word should I use?

I'm putting together a report for work. The template I've been given has a blurb already written in which I just insert the proper names for their respective state, and each state gets their own ...
1
vote
0answers
1k views

Variations of the same word

Here is a question for you guys. Im trying to find a good website or whatever place that can show me all forms of a specific word. For example the word "transparent" has other morphologies like "...