Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

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0
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1answer
98 views

Is this part of the sentence ambiguous?

I've negotiated the terms of my employment contract and have inserted the following sentence into the contract... No after-hours or post-employment restrictions and obligations other than what is ...
9
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4answers
2k views

Burgers with all the trimmings

I have an old-fashioned image in my kitchen, probably America-in-the-50s style, with a drawing of a burger costing 50 cents and the following text: Burgers with all the trimmings I didn't know ...
3
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2answers
341 views

What is the most appropriate word to describe the phenomenon of many church bells ringing concurrently?

Usually in celebration of a wedding or Christmas morning? Although I know I've read a word that describes this event exactly, I can't recall where or when. I've polled some pals and gotten "jubilee ...
0
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1answer
35 views

What do you call a word with affixes? [closed]

Is it an affixed word? Affixated word? Affixation results in a ______?
1
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1answer
72 views

What is the opposite of a loanword? [closed]

The words in a language that weren't borrowed.
2
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0answers
33 views

Is there a general term for small objects used in sewing/tailoring/knitting etc.? [closed]

Needles, thimbles, hooks and so on. I feel like there should be some all-encompassing word for that but I can't find it.
0
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2answers
67 views

Parts of speech in sentence “Amber is a real person” [closed]

Specifically I am wondering about the word "person" in the sentence, because at first thought I believed it was a common noun but it is qualifying a proper noun, so I am confused if it is a noun or a ...
2
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3answers
258 views

If eloquent speaking is 'oratory', then eloquent writing is

As it says in the headline, looking for a word that represents "the art of writing" in the same way that 'oratory' in some sense represents the "the art of speaking". Example: She had great ...
1
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0answers
42 views

Hyphenate two nouns [duplicate]

I was wondering if two nouns require a hyphen in between them. Mist pond or Mist-pond? Or am I confusing the first noun for a verb?
4
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2answers
255 views

Name for the central region of the human hand/foot?

According to Wikipedia, the human hand is conventionally divided into the following parts: Wrist: The region surrounding the carpal bones. Palm: The underside of the hand, lying superficial the ...
0
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1answer
187 views

Use of the preposition “by” along with “which” [duplicate]

There is a difference in the difficulty by which the two different objects can be lifted up. Is "by" correct here? Does "difficulty by which" sound natural? is there maybe a better alternative? ...
57
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4answers
14k views

If I farm, I'm a farmer. But if I guard, I'm a guard?

One who farms is called a farmer. One who waits is called a waiter. One who dives is called a diver. One who programs is called a programmer. But one who guards is called a guard. How did it come ...
8
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6answers
7k views

A situation when two or more people speak at the same time

The word or phrase I am looking for is quite opposite to that of the situation when people, such as students or sports players, sing their national anthem with the same tone and words. I want a ...
0
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6answers
99 views

What do you call a player on whom his or her team depends? [closed]

This athlete is very good at what he or she does. The coach counts on him/her. He's like the trustee of the game.
0
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1answer
54 views

To what noun does which refer to?

I have always had trouble identifying to which noun 'which' refers to in sentences. At this moment I am writing my thesis, and of the examples I am struggling with is the following: We use ...
1
vote
1answer
616 views

Term for “something which is easy to remember; memorable” - a noun

A "mnemonic" is a term for a system which makes something easier to remember. Is there a term for something which is easy to remember in itself? An example might be the sign language signs of "eat" ...
0
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2answers
58 views

Can a proper noun be a predicative in imperatives?

I live in a city called Kobe in the western part of Japan.  Perhaps some of you might have known that it was severely hit and damaged by the Great Hanshin Earthquake some 20 years ago.  The City, ...
3
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3answers
529 views

Word for someone who has plastic surgery, breast augmentation, etc.? [closed]

She's a ______ beauty. My beauty is natural, hers is _________.
1
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2answers
94 views

Can there be a comma between the adverb and the noun of the last member of a series?

I saw a practice SAT question on Khan Academy: Certified Executive Chef Hilary DeMane has prepared confections for celebrities, governors, and even Ronald Reagan. The correct answer is filled in ...
3
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1answer
139 views

What is a short term for words that have more than one spelling?

Is there a word or short term for words that have multiple valid spellings that don't correspond to any differences in meaning or pronunciation? The different spellings can be described as "spelling ...
-1
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1answer
62 views

Subject-matter of x, subject of x, object of x

Please help me understand the difference in meaning an nuance between the following phrases: Subject-matter of x (e.g. subject-matter of a book) Subject of x (e.g. subject of a discussion) Object of ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Word for someone who joins a lot of contests [closed]

Is there a word for someone who joins a lot of contests? Like how this one castaway from Survivor pops up in The Amazing Race and now he's in Big Brother. This person was in American Idol 5 years ago,...
3
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1answer
418 views

Word or phrase for fake appearance or posturing

I'm looking for a noun (it has to be an object) that expresses the concept of fake appearances. In Spanish, we can express that with the word "facade" understood as the front of a wall (but part of ...
-1
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3answers
251 views

What part of speech is “while” in “We will rest for a while”?

What part of speech is while in "We will rest for a while."? My teacher says while is a noun, but I feel that it is an adverb, as it comes as an answer to the question "We will rest for how much ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Use of chief as equivalent of boss

According to the OLD, the noun chief can be used for a person with a high rank or the highest rank in a company or an organization. However, while it of course appears in CEO and other job ...
2
votes
1answer
232 views

Is “Underground” a proper noun or a common noun?

The definition on the Oxford Dictionary is a little bit confusing for me. The dictionary doesn't call it a proper noun, but the first letter is capitalised in the example. Since I know the ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

What is the term for “‑ate” noun/verb pairs, and why can’t I find references to “hyphenate” used that way?

When you conjugate (verb, conjuGATE) things you get a conjugate (noun, conjuGIT). When you precipitate (verb, ...TATE) a solution you get a precipitate (noun, ...TIT). When you concentrate (verb, ......
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Why do few people say “How is your today?”?

My mom asks me "How is your today?" every day. I have been trying to tell her that nobody ever says that, and that most people say, "How is your day?" (somehow, using the noun day is more acceptable ...
29
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6answers
8k views

Why is it “came back from the dead” and not “came back from the death”?

Many times now, I've heard native English speakers (from the USA and Canada) say "he came back from the dead" instead of "from the death" when they mean resurrection. Dead is not a noun, so I don't ...
0
votes
1answer
228 views

The date on which a reservation was created vs on which a reservation is valid

A reservation can have two dates. The first is the date on which the reservation was created, e.g. July 1. The second is the date on which the reservation is valid, e.g. July 2 On July 1, I made a ...
0
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3answers
145 views

What's the word for “something that we've been looking for?”

I need a word for when someone is trying to buy a new shirt, but hasn't found anything suitable yet. For example: He searched everywhere but couldn't find his........... Note: this applies to more ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Different twist on “public” is or are?

I just read this sentence: "Note that 'public' have also other usages:" Since in this use of "public," we're talking about the word itself & not the group it's referring to, shouldn't the verb ...
1
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4answers
145 views

A word for general proficiency with musical instruments

I'm looking for a word for skill or talent with musical instruments in general. This is for a video game, there are skills like singing and dancing and I can't put "musical instruments" because its ...
1
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2answers
104 views

Plural for surnames derived from other words? [duplicate]

I recently came across a surname in a podcast, called Barleyfoot. In the podcast, his family was referred to as the Barleyfeet. Is this correct? Or should it be Barleyfoots? What about other possible ...
-3
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1answer
313 views

understanding meaning of 'cuttie' [closed]

Urban Dictionary tends to describe the word cuttie in quite sexual way. Is it really the main meaning or the noun can be used normally to name a person / thing which is just cute.
8
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2answers
1k views

“There is a woman with a snapper.”

So far, I haven't found a clue to this use of the word "snapper" (1851) to describe an energetic, irrepressibly attractive woman at any of the 19th century slang websites so far. Here is part of the ...
0
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1answer
81 views

A noun followed by name

I'm writing about a painter who depicts his imaginary world that he calls Argondia. Question: Consider a sentence, "His paintings are reflections of an imaginary world Argondia". Is the ending "...
1
vote
1answer
183 views

Is there a term for an equivocal compound e.g. “guinea pig”

"Sweetbread," "guinea pig," "shortbread" (a typical Scottish biscuit), "egg cream" (a carbonated drink), and "firefly" are all not what their two nouns claim. A sweetbread is neither sweet nor ...
4
votes
1answer
612 views

Removal of a repeated syllable for ease of pronunciation

What do you call the removal of a repeated syllable in words for ease of pronunciation? I read about it once. I think it has to do with alliterative sounds. Not sure if it was deliberate or not.
1
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3answers
103 views

Is “catarolysis” a word? Whether it is or not, how might it be broken down into Greek or Latin derivatives?

Some definitions I have seen are: "catarolysis - n. - cursing to let off steam" and "catarolysis: letting off steam by cursing" and "catarolysis /kat uh RALL ih sis/ n The practice of cursing to ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

What is a one-word synonym for “absence of trade”?

I am trying to describe the state of an economy (or country/region if you like) that does not trade using a noun. My best choice so far is "autarky", but this means rather "absence of necessity to ...
1
vote
1answer
344 views

Which is idiomatic: “kite is flying” or “kite is floating”? [closed]

Is it idiomatic to say "A kite is floating in the sky"? Most of the time I see "A kite is flying in the sky".
2
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2answers
867 views

Amount vs amounts?

When does we use "amounts"? Is my sentence " Ireland generated small amounts of waste. " correct?
3
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1answer
99 views

Correct or not: noun and adjective being predicative together

I'm thinking about such a sentence: He is a lawyer, arrogant and smart. or He is an idiot, arrogant and short-sighted. Please note that here I just want to list the noun and the ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Shortening sentence by removing nouns repeating in clauses

In the following sentence, a noun is repeated in each clause. The noun I refer to is assignment. He is aware of the assignment, accepts the assignment and endeavours to fulfil the assignment. Is ...
5
votes
2answers
121 views

Was “remake” as a noun coined by the movie industry?

Remake as a verb has a long history: 1630s, from re- "back, again" + make (v.) (Etymonline) but its usage as a noun appears to be a much more recent one; according to Google Books its ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

Is there a specific English word for a woman that has not given birth yet?

Is there a specific English word for a woman that has not given birth yet? I don't mean a sterile woman. I mean a young woman, who is not pregnant, who hasn't got children, who hasn't given birth. ...
1
vote
3answers
679 views

Is there a word to describe someone as striving to be the best version of himself he can be?

I am trying to describe someone with the mentality NOT of trying to be better than others, but rather to be the best version of himself that he can be. So a sort of striving and determination, but ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

what do we call people who watch football

In everyday talks, I encountered the following problem. I have always used the word "fans" to refer to those who watch football. However, when I tried to just refer to the people and not how they feel ...
2
votes
0answers
705 views

When to use “-er” vs “-or” as a suffix in verbs - a comprehensive example (a developer's perspective)!

It's been many times when it comes to decide whether to use "-or" or "-er" as an agent noun suffix to a verb. My native (mother language) is Greek, and I'll try to provide you a way to think before ...