Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Is there currently a shift from -nce word endings to -ncy word endings?

This is something I think I've noticed, but maybe I've just been noticing odd word choices and putting it down to a shift in language use. Has anyone noticed a shift from people using verb-derived ...
0
votes
1answer
489 views

Proper noun capitalisation: “The Union” or “the Union”? [duplicate]

When capitalising a proper noun that has a “the” prefix, should the “the” be capitalised? Eg: “This puts the Union at risk” or: “This puts The Union at risk”
1
vote
4answers
190 views

Is there a word that denotes the process by which a new leader is selected?

I'm looking for a word that describes the process by which a leader is chosen. I would use "election", but that word contains too much information about the details of the process. I need something ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

A possible Spanish origin for “lunch”

I have recently discovered the words of José María Pemán from 1941 regarding the origin of the English word lunch. My translation (sorry): Wellington's Englishmen arrive in Spain, they fall in love ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

English terms for a female wolf and a female owl?

In the English language, what are the right terms for a female wolf and a female owl; perhaps "she wolf" and "owl hen"? Are there distinct or separate words in English used for feminine? I checked ...
4
votes
1answer
426 views

Can a house have a 'roof' but no 'ceiling' in its upper floor?

A user in the Spanish Language site asked a question about how to distinguish 'ceiling' from 'roof' in Spanish, and gave us the following example: The top floor of my house does not have a ceiling ...
24
votes
4answers
6k views

What is the plural of the noun “go” (as in “have a go”)? [closed]

If I were to try to achieve something you could say I "had a go". If I tried it multiple times, how would I write that down? I had many goes or I had many go's or I had many gos
3
votes
2answers
120 views

Why does English have the word “broomstick”?

Oxford Living Dictionaries' dictionary of North American English defines broomstick as : 1 The long handle of a broom. 1.1 A brush with twigs at one end and a long handle, on which, in children'...
3
votes
3answers
97 views

Need a good word for “parts of the day”

Does anyone know an alternative (smarter) word for "parts of the day" ? examples: afternoon, dusk, evening, morning, night, et cetera My problem is I'm writing a form where I would like to ask what ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Noun for someone who is looking for kicks, thrills or excitement

Is there a single (non-colloquial) noun/word which describes a person who seeks/is looking for thrills, excitement or 'kicks'? For context, I am an English mother tongue translator (Italian to ...
9
votes
6answers
6k views

A word that means “the yield of a hunt”

I am looking for a word that can be used for the catch resulting from a hunt. For example, a fox catches a rabbit and in that case, the rabbit is the prey. However if one talks about prey in general,...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

word for a person who learns a lot by heart when studying

Do you happen to know a noun to describe someone, usually a student, who does a lot of learning by heart, as opposed to understanding? Is 'grind', 'swot'/'swotter' a good word for that, or does it ...
0
votes
2answers
120 views

The state of not knowing and/or ignoring each other

I'm looking for a word that expresses the state of not knowing and/or ignoring each other. In a blog post I've found the term Principle of Mutual Oblivion. This is supposed to be a rule in software ...
2
votes
1answer
30 views

“The Gaussian elimination” or “Gaussian elimination”?

I have seen it used without a quantifier in my textbook, but I don’t see how it doesn’t need one. Some example sentences: The LU factorization leads to another perspective on Gaussian elimination. ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

What is a word for a symbol of something that simultaneously is a manifestation of the thing it symbolizes? [closed]

I am looking for a word that would mean a symbol of some quality or entity that simultaneously IS the thing it symbolizes. An example would be an Egyptian ankh which is the word 'life', the amulet of ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Is there a name for the substitution of “the + singular noun” for a plural noun?

For instance, I might say, "Overcrowding is a major concern in the classroom today" rather than "Overcrowding is a major concern in classrooms today". Is that substitution a literary device? The ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Is it a noun or pronoun or something else?

Circle the nouns in the following paragraph. For the first time in her life, Mary was seeing two boys at once. It involved extra laundry, an answering machine, and dark solo trips in ...
6
votes
9answers
513 views

A word describing the core point of a newspaper opinion column [duplicate]

Is there a word that denotes or describes the most important point in the newspaper opinion section? For instance, have a look at the screenshot of the piece of opinion from DAWN: In the picture ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

What does “hit” mean in today's headline?

Can anybody tell me the meaning of "hit" in this CNN headline: "British bank takes $125 million hit from Brexit risks". I've looked up the word in several dictionaries, but I can't find any suitable ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Gerund + noun(s) equals noun(s) + noun(s)?

Today, when I was reading some meme on 9gag, I saw a phrase, and I tried rephrasing it in my head, but it went confusing and gave me this question in return :( The never spoken rules of using ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Hypernym for “conjunction” and “opposition”

Conjunction and opposition are terms from astronomy and astrology, and refer to two celestial bodies (usually planets) being together, or opposite one another, as seen from a third body (almost-always ...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

How would you call someone/thing who adheres (or not) to a set of regulations?

Given a regulatory body of some form, what is the term for someone or something that adheres to those regulations? I'm looking for a noun or collective noun, rather than an adjective. An example ...
2
votes
1answer
26 views

Word (or words) that mean “types of property”

I'm writing an application that lists properties, and I've noticed that there are different types (or categories) of the types of a property: Detached Semi-detached Terraced End terrace Then there ...
3
votes
1answer
100 views

The grammar of “one another”

In sentences such as: They talked to one another Is the string one another a constituent, or are the two words part of a mandatorily gapped coordination of preposition phrases (or even verb phrases)?...
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Are the 2 consecutive nouns “tree color” in this sentence OK?

I am wondering whether this sentence is correct or not. "The tree color is absolutely beautiful" and if it's OK then what is the difference between the above sentence and the following sentence. "...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Of (verb), of (verb), and of (verb)?

Which is correct? Example 1: We want to emphasize the importance of running, swimming, and dancing. Example 2: We want to emphasize the importance of running, of swimming, and of dancing.
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Digits (location/position) vs. digits (glyph/symbol/value) on a display?

This is about (numerical) displays, eg. a "multiple-digit" display such as a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven-segment_display (LED or LCD) and the difference between a digit as a single-glyph ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Noun is a noun (terminology)

Is there any particular term for when we use one noun to describe/define another. Karl is a teacher Pigeons are birds. Basically, the format being “x is y”. Is there a name for the concept,...
4
votes
2answers
389 views

How is “plenty” a pronoun in “plenty of time”?

The Oxford Dictionaries list "plenty" as a pronoun. Example sentences include: I would have plenty of time to get home before my parents arrived There are shops in plenty But pronoun by ...
3
votes
2answers
69 views

Is there a noun denoting a person who is confused and awkward due to trauma?

What I'm looking for is a noun describing someone confused and awkward as a result of trauma. The word should replace MAN in the following sentence: He's no longer the floundering MAN I remember ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “series” plural or singular? [duplicate]

The word series seems to generally refer to a group which I would think makes it a singular reference, however the ies ending is also a common way to modify a singular noun into a plural noun (eg., ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Why do we use “War is horrific” but not “Wars are horrific”?

I saw sentences like War is horrific… War is hell,… I'm confused by that, I really appreciate if anyone could explain that for me. And can I say “Dog is…” and when should I say that, instead of ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Word for “parts of a plant”

Is there a word that means “plant part”? As in, “member/organ is to body as ______ is to plant”. Root, stalk, leaf, petal, stamen, are all what?
6
votes
1answer
384 views

What is the plural of “detective sergeant”?

What is the plural of "detective sergeant". In an episode of Endeavour, Series 5, episode 4, Superintendent Bright used "detectives sergeant" but this seems wrong, you wouldn't say "chiefs inspector" ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Push-lock door?

What do you call a door that opens, closes and locks with a gentle push? Like the one you find on some cabinets or glove compartments. Push-lock door? Springing door? Magnetic door?
1
vote
1answer
374 views

What is a person who owes you a favour called? [closed]

First of all, English is not my mother tongue. Secondly, I was wondering if there is such a word in the English language that describes a person, who owes you some favour (not really money tho). Like,...
2
votes
2answers
88 views

Difference between “Do you like latte?” and “Do you like lattes?”?

I was having this debate with a friend. She would ask “do you like latte?” When asking me if I liked the drink latte. I explained it would be “do you like lattes?”. However, she then asked “how come ...
36
votes
11answers
13k views

Word for the thief's key that can unlock anything

Is there any specific word that describes or denotes a key, which helps thief to steal anything and anywhere, no matter what kind of lock there is. In a nut shell that key can unlock any locks e.g. of ...
0
votes
2answers
75 views

“draft invoice” or “upcoming invoice”?

If I have a provisional document that is listing the items that will be billed for this month (subject to change, because the month is not yet finished), then what is the better term? "draft invoice" ...
3
votes
2answers
78 views

“Continuous walk” or “Continuous walking”?

The full sentence is "30 minutes of continuous Walk." or "30 Minutes of Continuous Walking." Thanks.
2
votes
1answer
398 views

What is a hobbyist who collects old newspapers called?

Is there an English word for someone who collects newspapers as a hobby eg. a philatelist collects stamps, a ..... collects newspapers. Thank you.
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Which one is a better term: a men-hater, a men hater or a man hater? [closed]

Which one is a better term to describe a person who has a hatred towards men: a men-hater, a men hater or a man hater? In the Corpus of Contemporary American English there are such combinations like "...
2
votes
3answers
122 views

A noun that describes the possession of esoteric knowledge

I'm trying to come up with a noun that is more descriptive (or at least carries more tone) than "knowledge" and more succinct than "esoteric knowledge and trivia". Rather than saying "this person ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Word that means something despised, strongly avoided, or strongly disliked? [closed]

I know of many words that explain this feeling (abhorrence, enmity, etc for stronger examples) but what is a word that would be the object of these? As in, what word could be used as an object that ...
2
votes
2answers
124 views

Can we use “soar” as a noun?

Is this sentence grammatically right:"In 2030, petrol and oil are expected to see a soar in its consumption and still maitain its leading position". I have looked up the word "soar" in several ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Noun of “analysis-friendly”

I am drafting the following sentence: We would like to adopt XXX given its much better readability and "analysis-friendly". Obviously, analysis-friendly shall be used as an adjective, not like ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

A word denoting the sound of turning pages

The two words (adjectives) I found in Yahoo Answers site, that perhaps (I am not sure) describe the sound of turning pages, when they rifled by the wind: fluttering and flapping. Other than those ...
1
vote
2answers
101 views

What is the correct term to describe “An animal with the ability to fly”?

After searching I couldn't find anything, with the closest depiction being a pilot. "___ animals have a different form of locomotion to aquatic or terrestrial animals."
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Can I use the word “sense” in this case?

I'm writing an article and I'm in doubt about the sentence below. Basically, uncanny valley "is a hypothesized relationship between the degree of an object's resemblance to a human being and the ...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

Why is the genitive case necessary/unecessary in the examples below?

I speak English as a second language, and I ran into something this week that I couldn't explain, even though I could understand its meaning. While reading an artcle entitled "More people now ...