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Questions tagged [non-native-english]

The tag has no usage guidance.

1
vote
1answer
50 views

“a food-hygienically acceptable substance”: Grammatical syntax?

In a document (written by a native Japanese speaker), I see the following phrase that sets off my acceptability and grammaticality alarms: a food-hygienically acceptable substance Google shows ...
-2
votes
1answer
57 views

Grammar — Nor without Neither but with Non

Is this sentence grammatically correct: Non necessarily convex nor simply connected
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Run “as” normal user vs. Run “with” normal user

On Linux Mint 19, I have a Makefile with a command which should output a sentence: Target 'distrib' has to be run as normal user! in case the user has run it as / with the root user. Since I am ...
12
votes
3answers
51k views

What does “rising senior” mean and what countries use it?

I know it is something to do with universities, but as I have never come across the term before today (and have lived in England all my life including going to an English university), I am assuming it ...
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

Why do native English speakers tend to have an easier time replicating English accents not their own?

Native English speakers are often able to go back and forth between various English accents with relative ease. This is often done in comedy. Non-Native speakers usually can't do this. What's the ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Does “prioritary” exist outside technical texts?

As a non-native speaker, I'm struggling to express correctly the sense of priority of a given population in a sentence. Is it correct to refer to "prioritary cities in the scope of the XYZ policy", ...
2
votes
0answers
121 views

How do I go about writing and pronouncing my name if it has non-english letters [closed]

So I'm soon going to England to study and I'm not quite sure how should I write or pronounce my name in English, which includes Lithuanian letters. I can't imagine anyone spelling my full name ...
4
votes
2answers
134 views

Is there a word for a subset of English specifically designed to be easily understood by non-native speakers?

Looking at examples like Basic English or Simple English, I see phrases like "controlled language" or "controlled vocabulary". Is there a simpler word?
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Does it make sense in English? [closed]

The sentence is "I can't picture playing without putting my middle finger on W" and I'm talking about playing video games on pc.
11
votes
3answers
26k views

Do people from India consider English their primary language?

I was watching an rerun episode of the Big Bang Theory the other night. And, a character who is from India (Rajesh) is losing an argument with the following dialog: Raj: Okay, well, let me just ...
32
votes
3answers
6k views

Term like air lock, but underwater?

I am looking for the right term for... well, like an air lock on a space station, but for an underwater station. You open the outer hatch, get in, close the hatch, water gets pumped out, you open the ...
8
votes
5answers
77k views

Visit of, to, or at a research department?

A non-native speaker needs help with the following phrase to be used in the acknowledgments section of a research paper: "Parts of the this research were conducted during a visit of the ...
24
votes
10answers
66k views

Do native English speakers use the word “touristic”?

A word usage that always annoys me and feels like Euroenglish to me is "touristic". I don't believe I've ever seen it printed or heard it used by a native English speaker and I've travelled in most ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Many non-native speakers pronounce 'azure' like 'Asia' or like 'essure' when naming Microsoft's product Azure - wrong pronounciation or am I mistaken? [duplicate]

I live in Austria and I am a student in computer science and there is a specific thing that drives me bonkers: Everytime when a person in my vicinity or I am coversing with is mentioning the procuct "...
13
votes
7answers
32k views

“Close the light” — regionalism or mere oddity?

If I want the room in darkness, and wish to announce my intent, I would say I'm going to turn off the light. But occasionally here in America I hear people say I'm going to close the light. It'...
-3
votes
1answer
327 views

There is no activity since a to b or No activity since a to b? [closed]

It's used in the app's interface. I wonder if omitting there is/there are is not a grammatical mistake and sounds native (I'm not a native speaker). So, which do you think will sound better in a ...
2
votes
1answer
193 views

I wonder if the speaker of the speech is native or not [closed]

I'm a student studying English as a foreign language that means I'm studying English in the place where everyone else doesn't speak English at all. So it is really hard for me to have a chance to use ...
1
vote
3answers
904 views

Use of punctuation of “First,…”

I am uncertain if and how to punctuate if I use only one sentence for the following idea: We conducted two varieties of an experiment. First, we left used method A. Second, we used method B. Can I ...
0
votes
1answer
144 views

Understanding of racism in a sentence [closed]

Recently there was a quite an argument in certain group of people coming from various countries, each having different English skill and obviously different understanding of things in English. The ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Play and hang out

I noticed a lot of Asian people use the word "play" when they want to say "I'm hanging out".. Like this one friend said she was playing with her friends. And sent me a picture of them drinking and ...
3
votes
1answer
374 views

“Of any mall” vs. “of any malls”

I am an English native speaker working with non-native English teachers. In one of our texts, we came across the following sentence: ABC Mall has the most comprehensive loyalty rewards program of ...
0
votes
5answers
406 views

When do we consider English speakers' familiarity as a proof? [closed]

English, like many other languages, has its own usage of words and convention that can only be captured by practicing and speaking with natives. For instance, if a non-English-speaker comes up with a ...
33
votes
18answers
10k views

Are there any words whose spelling was deliberately changed to make them non-offensive?

I am looking for some examples of words that, possibly due to their non-Latin origin, would have sounded offensive if they went through the English language rules. For example, if a specialty Bohemian ...
1
vote
1answer
395 views

pronouncing foreigner's names [duplicate]

I want to ask you if there's some special rule about pronouncing foreign names with or without accent. For example, can I say Fedor or Andrey in native russian manner and with russian accent or should ...
5
votes
1answer
171 views

Use definite article or not in conjunction with a German institution's name which contains a strongly declined article?

Picture some German university's arthistory department, and its official title would be "Kunsthistorisches Institut". "Kunsthistorisch" is an adjective, and "kunsthistorisches" is its nominative case. ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Can you be a native speaker in two languages? [closed]

I was not born in an English-speaking country, but since birth, my mom spoke to me in one language and my dad another. It was and still is a bit of a mishmash, but I started kindergarten in America, ...
3
votes
2answers
325 views

Respective Use of “Respective” in English of German Speakers

Can anyone familiar with English use by German speakers explain the use of "respective" as in the list of examples below? I see this frequently from German government bureaucrats and the like, and ...
-3
votes
1answer
881 views

American and British English Spelling [closed]

I am a non-native English speaker. I was taught British English in my school days, but now I work in American English. The problem is whenever I try to write English there is a mix up of American and ...
5
votes
3answers
978 views

The influence of non-native speakers on the English language

I can’t lay my hands on the reference, but David Crystal has reported an increase in the use of informations by native speakers, as a result of its use by non-native speakers. The OED has 59 citations ...
1
vote
2answers
197 views

Identify English accent

My English teacher speaks, as far as I can tell as a native speaker of the German language, some really weird English. However, I'm not entirely sure if this is just my twisted perception or really a ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Why do non-native speakers consider “bitch” to mean “prostitute”? [closed]

Why do so many non-native speakers from very different linguistic backgrounds seem to understand the term bitch as being a synonym for prostitute?-- I have never heard a native speaker use the former ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Genitive without apostrophe or s?

I have to translate the title of my college work and I can't decide whether it is correct to say "Colleagues rating system" or "Colleagues' rating system", because I have often seen examples where ...
-2
votes
2answers
16k views

No one knows or no one know? [closed]

Can you tell which of the following sentences are right? And explain why the others are wrong? No one knows the answer. No one know the answer. There is nobody anwering the qustion. There is nobody ...
2
votes
3answers
672 views

how do you say disillusioned using a word “fantasy”?

I am writing an essay, but I am having a hard time using the word, fantasy, right. "I had fantasy about living abroad, but when I arrived there, my fantasy was " I want to continue with that ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

“I am a beneficiary from” or “I benefited from”? [closed]

Which is more native like? I personally am a beneficiary of the good policies he conducted. or I personally benefited from the good policies he conducted.
1
vote
0answers
340 views

Same, same but different

If anyone has been to S.E. Asian countries there is a familiar English phrase, Same, same but different. It always brings a smile to my face when I hear it as you kind of know what the person is ...
0
votes
0answers
85 views

What does it mean when someone uses two periods? [duplicate]

In past communications with non-native English speakers, I occasionally see the use of two periods. Some examples: Ok.. let's meet soon. Sounds good.. Thursday Meeting.. This seems to ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “research” as a countable noun actually used by native speakers?

I see this phrase being used often by non-native speakers, and it never fails to strike me as incorrect: "In this research, [...]" I also note that Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster consider that ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

When or where did “sth” come to mean “something”? [duplicate]

This is not the same question as What is meant by "sth"? although one of it's answers is a partial answer to this question. This question does not relate to "what does sth mean?" but those ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

`Since as a` vs `Ever since I was a`

Example: Since as a little kid, I had passion about ... Is this acceptable to say as opposed to: Ever since I was a little kid, ... or Since I was a little kid, ... Is It possible to write ...
10
votes
3answers
4k views

Why do non-native English speakers get the present participle wrong?

I see people saying things like this: With a new infusion of cash it allows to make the film. ...instead of... With a new infusion of cash it allows making the film. I can't find a ...
-3
votes
2answers
416 views

“Name1 Name2 are also want to join?” [closed]

"name1 name2 are also want to join?" Is totally incorrect, however, I am unable to explain it, so as why is it incorrect. Could you please help me explain it?
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

A question about the Ancient Greek word 'πῦρ' in Arher Machen's “The Shining Pyramid” [closed]

Has anyone read this novel? I am quite puzzled. πῦρ is the derivation of fire. Has fire anything to do with Pyramid?
3
votes
3answers
796 views

Grammar: What does it really take to be “very good” at it? [closed]

I will try to formulate this question so that it makes sense for a wider audience and suits the style of the QA here. Feel free to suggest changes. I am a non-native English speaker living in the US ...
-1
votes
3answers
1k views

Which English words are commonly misused by non-native English speakers? [closed]

It's quite easy to find lists of commonly misused words. They are all over the internet. But it's not clear which of them are the MOST commonly misused words. This article says that there are 38 ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What is the best way of asking someone his or her strongest language?

It seems that the term 'first language', 'native language', 'mother tongue' each may have some different connotations or unnecessary implications of political correctness to some people. 'L1' seems to ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

the and thee (I prefer to pronounce it as thuh all the time) [closed]

My question is can I always pronounce THE with thuh instead of thee? Because unlike "a" "an" rule, pronouncing "thee" seems cumbersome for some people (including me) Note that I know the "emphasis" ...
6
votes
3answers
541 views

If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?

It seems that there are quite a few terms that look like English and are used in English spoken by non-fluent or fluent but nonnative speakers of English as a second language amongst themselves, but ...
2
votes
3answers
656 views

Is “wanna” more common with non-native speakers?

Is the word "wanna" (as opposed to "want to") more common in the writing of non-native speakers than in the writing of native speakers of English? Is this effect more pronounced when you exclude ...
2
votes
0answers
161 views

Which word can honestly portray a non-native's language abilities [closed]

I have often been intrigued by the following questions in various documents across the Indian sub-continent: Ability to read, speak, and write - Yes. Fluency level- Beginner, Intermediate, ...