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Questions tagged [nominalizations]

The tag has no usage guidance.

4
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1answer
480 views

Why can “dispute” be both verb and noun, but “refute” only a verb?

The word dispute be used as a verb or a noun: Do not dispute me on this. The dispute was settled quickly. However, the word refute can be used only as a verb: I shall refute this claim. The only ...
1
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1answer
64 views

-ness words as count nouns?

I came across this sentence in a book: He was astonishingly humble, exhibited great charitableness and such a sweetness and meekness that he would often shed tears at a sad story. It seems strange ...
12
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1answer
2k views

-able & -ability usage: Why can't “searchability” be a word? (Or can it?)

Sometimes I edit a question title on Stack Exchange in order to make it more clear and easier for users to find it when searching. In the comment field I usually enter: "Title edited for clarity and ...
1
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3answers
595 views

Is 'Japanese' in 'the Japanese' (people from Japan collectively) a noun or an adjective?

Oxford Dictionaries classify 'Japanese' in 'the Japanese,' meaning people from Japan collectively, as a noun although some people I consulted insist it is an adjective. They base it on the examples '...
1
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1answer
891 views

A verb used as an adjective used as a noun used as an adjective?

The Question: Is it acceptable to use a nominalized participle as an adjective? A participle is a verb form used as an adjective; examples include the running man and the caught ball, as well as (...
3
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2answers
496 views

Do words that act as nouns and adjectives in the same form constitute a particular part of speech class?

I'm looking for words similar to female, that can act as nouns and adjectives, but a) can so so only without changing form, and b) are unable to act as other parts of speech. Is there a class or ...
0
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3answers
659 views

‘Responsible’ as a noun

In Scandinavian languages, ‘ansvarig’ is an adjective which means ‘responsible’, but is also often used as a noun to denote a role. E.g., every university course has a ‘kursansvarig’. People typically ...
3
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1answer
2k views

“Basket of Deplorables”

I never heard of the idiom "basket of deplorables" and did´t find it anywhere.. could someone explain it? The meaning of deplorable according to my dictionary (as adjective): deserving strong ...
0
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2answers
361 views

Is this usage of “short-lived” common?

In a Last Week Tonight's segment on Ashley Madison, a married dating site, you can see John Oliver saying “Life is short. Have an affair. That is the most morally dubious slogan since Toyota’s ...
0
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1answer
754 views

Nominalization for “to address” [closed]

is there a nominalization of the verb "to address"? As in "They have addressed the issue in a recent statement. What is their ____ ?" Thanks
0
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3answers
99 views

“critical” nominalization [closed]

I'm looking for the nominalization of the adjective "critical". Basically, a noun synonymous with the following: The extent to which a particular issue or item is critical or vital Any ideas? ...
1
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4answers
1k views

What is the nominal form of the verb “to give”?

Normally one can add -tion or -ation to a verb to make it nominal, but that nominalization doesn't work for "give". Is there a nominalized form of "to give"? If not, is there a word that could serve ...
1
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1answer
164 views

Term for Making a New Word that is the Same Part of Speech as its Root

Recently, I've been noticing that in casual speech people often unwittingly create new words from standard English words that are (a) of the same part of speech as the standard word and (b) meant to ...
0
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2answers
92 views

Nominalizations and the missing “the”

This guide equips you with a strategy to ease adoption of a new technology within your organization. Assume that I want to keep this noun (adoption). Is the article "the" missing here? Should it be ...
1
vote
1answer
462 views

Is 'overreach' just a verb?

Reading an article on the New York Times website, I came across the verb 'overreach' functioning as a noun. I immediately looked it up on the net and apparently it's just a verb, so I wanted to know ...
2
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1answer
8k views

What are some examples of “zombie nouns and verbs”?

This is one of the New York Times writing rules.I don't know exactly what “zombie nouns” and verbs mean here. Can someone give some examples? Rule 6: Write With Non-Zombie Nouns and Verbs ...
6
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4answers
4k views

using “the”+adj without a noun

Is the following sentence good/legal/understood English? Meditation melts the coarse and solidifies the subtle. If it isn't, how can this be otherwise expressed, in a neat and concise way?
10
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2answers
11k views

Rules for nominalizing a verb

To nominalize a verb, you sometimes use the gerund. to happen --> a happening Sometimes it's a different word. to arrive --> an arrival so we don't write to arrive --> an *arriving Is ...
2
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1answer
1k views

When to nominalize?

When is it correct to use nominalizations? (Isn't nominalization a nominalization?) It seems the main problem is that they tend to mislead the reader. It is appealing to think that "being" and "...
14
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3answers
466k views

Is “agreeance” a proper word?

Many people in my area use the word "agreeance" and I find it irksome. Dictionary.com seems to be in agreement with me (har har): http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/agreeance Main Entry: ...