Questions tagged [nicknames]

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5
votes
1answer
611 views

How common are hypocorisms ending with “s” in female names? (Babs, Bess, Becks…)

My question can be split in two parts: Is this a pattern, how common is it, and how natural does it sound? Is it more specific to feminine names? Here are examples: Barbara - Babs [1] Elizabeth - ...
0
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1answer
39 views

How would you punctuate someone referring to themselves by a nickname? [duplicate]

Being the "family freeloader," as Tom liked to call himself, he felt as though he had no right to complain. Should the comma come after the quotation marks, or is the current placement ...
1
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1answer
111 views

Is there a term for nicknames which are inserted between first and last names?

Examples: Mike "no-stop" Granger Jimmy "the wrench" Parsons Is there a specific term that describes either of the following? the nickname that comes between the first and last ...
0
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0answers
99 views

How do unisex names come about in English?

TL;DR How do unisex names develop amidst, or out of, gendered ones in English (and other languages)? Detail In English, many (most?) names have a gender assignment of male or female. However, some are ...
3
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3answers
238 views

Why were some guns such as the Thompson submachine gun nicknamed 'chicago piano'?

It's a 1920s gangster/mob thing, to keep your submachine gun in some kind of case resembling an instrument, so I can understand why they were called other nicknames like 'Chicago Typewriter' (...
0
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1answer
57 views

Are there any poetic names for a “rainbow”

I cannot seem to find any poetic names for "rainbow", something like how the Sun was given the poetic name "the eye of heaven" in Elizabethan England. and other delightful coinages ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Finding Meanings of English Names [duplicate]

In Sinhala the name Suminda means calm disposition from the words Samya (calm) + Indu (faculties). In the case of English, how does one understand the meaning of names? E.g. names like Ann, Tom, Dick, ...
2
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1answer
3k views

How to indicate middle name is preferred name in professional email signature

In almost all situations, I prefer to be addressed by my legal middle name. However, in the email signature (what's automatically included at the bottom of the email) of my university email, I must ...
0
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2answers
143 views

What's a word for someone who scoffs at someone else's feelings?

I am trying to find a word someone who ridicules someone else's feelings. When I say generally anything, they'll say something completely unnecessary (and usually hurtful). Most of the time, I am not ...
1
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1answer
142 views

Looking for an appropriate English name to replace my Chinese name [closed]

Background: I am Chinese, and after living abroad from China for several years, I realize that I need an English name anyway. I’ve seen too many confused faces looking at my Chinese name. My Chinese ...
0
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0answers
54 views

Pronouncing initials as a word

I have long 3 names that i want to shorten so people can pronounce it easier, the initials of my full name are "M.E.Z", which sound a little heavy to pronounce letter by letter, do name initials have ...
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0answers
40 views

is “Bee” a moniker?

Sometimes the word "Bee" is used affectionately to describe a woman you care about. Examples: "Hi Bee". "I love you Bee". People also use the word "Boo" in a similar way. Would this be a moniker? I ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Race question for curiosity purposes

What is the name for someone that wants to be a different race. Like for example if I wanted to be black but I am white what would be the name for that.I saw a post like this and I didn't get a clear ...
1
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1answer
200 views

Could “Terry” be a diminutive for Peter or Walter?

I know "Terry" is used as a given name, and derives from french Thierry. It could also be used as a nickname for e.g. Terence. Here the first syllable of the given name is used as the stem in the ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Commodore Blimp [closed]

I am reading Martin Booth's Gweilo. Booth mentions several times that his inflexible father was called "Commodore Blimp" behind his back by his colleagues in the navy. I do not understand ...
0
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1answer
24 views

Usage of “[Name] of [Company]”

I believe I've heard a phrase such as Steven Stevenson of Microsoft or Kylie Kyleson of StackExchange How frequent is it to refer to someone in this way, or in other words, does it sound too ...
-1
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1answer
71 views

Why did James Harrington nickname Oliver Cromwell “Lord Achon” [closed]

Going back a year or two, was foreaware of the Cromwell nick "His Noseship" but not "Lord Achon" itself said to be from a character in James Harrington's writings Oceana. Haps heedful all the online ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Punctuating an Initialized/Abbreviated Last Name

What is the proper method, in American English, to punctuate a name that's been abbreviated to an initial? I.e., "Dr. S," if the full last name was something like, say, "Syzlowski," or someone named, ...
4
votes
2answers
131 views

What is the history of using “Jersey” for “New Jersey”?

I have long wondered the origin of calling New Jersey by the nickname "Jersey". To the best of my knowledge, no one has ever shortened New York or New Hampshire to "York" or "Hampshire", or ...
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0answers
1k views

Proper Usage of Nicknames?

I’m already aware that nicknames are usually incorporated into the larger name between the first and last names — John “Jack” Doe, for example — and that this is essentially standard usage. When you ...
1
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2answers
12k views

Quotation marks for nicknames

E.g. "I get called Hitler in school." or "I get called 'Hitler' in school."? Would quotation marks be needed for 'Hitler'? What if it was an uncommon or nonsensical word like 'A123' or 'Gaylord'. ...
0
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1answer
943 views

articles before nicknames [closed]

Why in some cases there is "the" before nicknames and in some there is no?I also have a question if it's appropriate to use an article "a" before nicknames.For instance: Erwin "The Desert Fox" Rommel ...
6
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1answer
673 views

Looking for origins of “craney-crow”

I'm looking for the origin of the term or nick-name "Craney-Crow." There are other spellings, but this turns up as the name of a character in the "Uncle Remus" stories. I'm wondering if it originated ...
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0answers
49 views

Nickname in quotations? [duplicate]

A married lady's proper name is Mrs. Rutledge Dingle. Her first name is Frances. When addressed by her nickname, Miss Fran, should "Miss Fran" be set off in quotation marks? "Miss Fran" was my ...
1
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1answer
301 views

term for a nickname composed of an auto-antonym

What is the term for a contradictory nickname such as "Tiny" for a very large person?
1
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1answer
174 views

suffix -ems (in slangy/hip-hop context): what special meaning (if any) does it convey and how commonplace is it?

One of Shaquille O'Neal's numerous nicknames is "Extra-Tallems". It's mentioned in a text I've been asked to translate and I'm trying to be somewhat creative. Any sort of informative background ...
2
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0answers
162 views

What is the proper term for global nicknames such as “Dude”, “Slick”, “Jack”, etc? [duplicate]

Some people have the tendency to use words in a context similar to a pronoun, despite the word in question being an adjective, verb, whatever. Examples would be someone like Agent K in the film "Men ...
15
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2answers
3k views

Why do some nicknames have no apparent relation with their original counterparts? [duplicate]

I find it unusual and rather contrary to common sense and logic that some nicknames should have no apparent relation to their original names, such as "Jack" for "John(eg. JFK)" or "Jonathan", "Patsy" ...
4
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1answer
14k views

Why is Hugh called 'Shuggy' in Scottish?

Different english-speaking cultures have different conventions for names. In Australia - your name is shortened or lengthened as a term of endearment. Rose becomes Rosie, Mitchell becomes Mitch and ...
2
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1answer
182 views

Is there a reason that “Righty” isn't a good nickname? [closed]

I'm not sure if it's just the fact that most people are right handed. I have a jumping spider that's missing its left front leg, so I thought about nicknaming it "Righty", but then I realized that ...
4
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3answers
848 views

Is there a synonym for nickname including '-onym'?

Words suffixed by '-onym' relate to different classifications of word, or more often, name. They refer to myriad different names from endonym to theronym but I cannot find an appropriate term for a ...
1
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2answers
164 views

Given Names - Common Practices

Were the names Rebecca and Elizabeth ever used interchangeably, specifically in Ireland? I am doing some family research, and it seems that these two names may have been used to refer to the same ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Is it suitable to use my native name 'Dong' in English environment in account of its special meaning in English? [closed]

As an alien whose first language is not English, I sometimes am in a very strange situation, is it suitable to use my native language name, Dong? I by chance know Dong has a little bit negative ...
0
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3answers
655 views

What can be an affectionate name for a car? [closed]

People who drive for a living (taxi drivers, delivery workers, etc.) are often fond of their cars and give them affectionate names. These names can stem from the car brand or model (such as a Beetle ...
3
votes
1answer
861 views

Commas and nicknames

I want to know, do you have to use a comma after a nickname WITH a name? Like would it be "Rose darling, how are you?" or "Rose, darling, how are you?" I'm curious to know what is the correct way to ...
3
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2answers
98 views

Is there a term for someone who barely moves their arms whilst walking?

I know someone who barely moves his arms when he walks, a bit like Frankenstein's monster. There is a Seinfeld episode ("The Summer of George") in which someone with the same behaviour is made fun of ...
3
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2answers
398 views

What are the application conditions of the phrase “the same name”? [closed]

Suppose my brother is named Bob, my father is named Robert, and my mother is named Roberta. Do these three people all have the same name? This is obviously not a question about their birth ...
0
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1answer
228 views

Is it common practice to shorten names with an “N” [duplicate]

Game of thrones : Eddard becomes Ned. Wuthering heights : Ellen becomes Nelly. It this common practice, or 2 isolated co-incidents? If it is common practice, is there a convention followed, stating ...
0
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0answers
28 views

“Tab Tree” or “Tabs Tree” (-s at the end) [duplicate]

I created an extension for Firefox and named it "Tabs Tree". The extension is for managing browser tabs and representing them in the form of a tree structure. But now I think that I should have named ...
0
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1answer
3k views

What do you call a 'Nickname' that's longer than the actual name?

I'm pretty sure I used to know the term for a nickname that was longer or an expansion of a person's name. EXAMPLE: My name is Sunny but friends sometimes call me Sunshine. Though longer, Sunshine ...
-4
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1answer
7k views

Why Anthony, Michael etc are called Tony, Mike etc? [duplicate]

It is a common practice, people calling and writing Tony for Anthony, Mike for Michael, Max for Maxwell etc. It is correct to write or call ? I mean Anthony and tony can be two different names. Why ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Capitals for a city nickname?

Say we pick a city, NotLondon. Now assign a nickname, "NotLondon, the city of tears", tears being a metaphor for rain. Should these be capitalized? Should the word 'the' be capitalized? I think it ...
0
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1answer
2k views

If you called someone named “Shelly” “Shels” for short, would you spell it “Shels” or “Shells?” [closed]

Or Kelly -- "Kels" or "Kells?" Is there a rule for this? If it's just a judgement call, I'm inclined to go with one "l" as both "Shells" and "Kells" have potentially confusing homonyms. I'm talking ...
-1
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2answers
482 views

Historical probabilities that a person is referred to by his or her first or last name by friends [closed]

This is really an anthropology question, but since there's no SE anthro forum and I already am a member of this forum, I'll ask it here. What is the probability that a male is (I don't use "man" ...
3
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4answers
349 views

What is a good translation of “crâne de piaf” as a nickname?

I'm looking for a translation of "Crâne de piaf", in English, in the context of a nickname given to some fictional character. Also, take note that I am native from France. What I'm looking for, ...
2
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1answer
9k views

Parentheses or quotations for English name (foreigner)? [closed]

My English name is Michael (my name is Minh, so Michael and Minh have some similarity). Should I put my name as: Minh "Michael" Nguyen or Minh (Michael) Nguyen (on a résumé, business card, email ...
7
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4answers
18k views

Just as there are a few nicknames for the U.S. (“Uncle Sam”, “Columbia”, “Yankee Land”), are there nicknames for England, or the U.K. for that matter?

This may look like General Reference, but I've googled "list of nicknames for England", "list of nicknames for the United Kingdom", and all I got was "list of city nicknames in the United Kingdom" or "...
0
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2answers
5k views

How do I quote a person with a nickname?

How would I set up the quotations for this sentence: "The current governor of California is Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown, a Democrat who was inaugurated January 3, 2011" (governors.library.ca.gov). Do I ...
2
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2answers
14k views

South African Slang “Nu”

Any idea what Nu means when someone uses it as a nickname for someone else in South Africa?
2
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1answer
179 views

In what circumstances are people's names shortened and given an '-ers' ending?

The Test Match Special team are known variously as Jonners (Brian Johnson - deceased); Aggers (Jonathan Agnew), Blowers (Henry Blofeld), Tuffers (Phil Tuffnell) etc. This laddish public-school ...