Questions tagged [neologisms]

A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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1answer
2k views

What is a “malaphor”?

I was just now looking online for the meaning of the idiom "leave it or lump it," and found it on Malaphors: (leave it or lump it) is a mash up of “love it or leave it” (be supportive of ...
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1answer
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Is there a term for coining a phrase for a word that already exists?

Usually a new term emerges and it becomes necessary to add a qualification to an old word for disambiguation. examples: "mono sound" versus "stereo sound" "analog watch"...
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What is a verb that means “is possible”?

These phrases have the same meaning: an existing X / X is existing / X exists As do these: a possible X / X is possible / X [sought word] Is there a verb that corresponds to 'exists', but has ...
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395 views

What terminology is used for English words coined by EFL speakers?

A neologism is a newly coined word. Is there a term for a new English-language word coined by people in another country for whom English is a foreign language? While visiting China a few years ago, ...
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1answer
7k views

Is there a word for 'love letter'?

Some types of letters — i.e., messages that you write on a piece of paper and send to someone — have their own name. In fact, for example, we call 'note' a short letter to someone, '...
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1answer
136 views

Use of 'went' as a noun

I have come across its use as a proper noun in an 1895 deed: "...all that one piece of pasture lying at Whatling Went." So I wondered if there is any evidence for the the use of 'went' as ...
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1answer
236 views

What effect is the writer trying to create with the use of “bigly?”

This is from the same paragraph that sparked my question about pratfall a few minutes ago. What is the origin of "pratfall?" The full paragraph is here (highlighting is mine): But the ...
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2answers
10k views

What does NOOT mean?

I was listening to Vertigo NCS release, on YouTube and every comment underneath was like "IT'S HIGH NOOT NOOT." 98%-ITS HIGH NOOT NOOT 2%- Random Comments It's high NOOT NOOT!!!!!!! ...
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1answer
687 views

Can some words of constructed languages be neologisms as well? [closed]

Recently I have found that words such as hobbit, quidditch even Khaleesi are used in the everyday language when not referring to the books and films they were invented for in the first place. Can they ...
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4answers
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Is 'she-woman' an acceptable counterpart of 'he-man'?

If this is, as it is, a real English example, I wanted to know what role his women played in persuading him that he was this incredible he-man. can this I wanted to know what role her men ...
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1answer
4k views

What does “drunch” mean?

Macmillan Dictionary gives two definitions of drunch which derive from the combination of two different sets of words: 1 - a meal that combines lunch and dinner. Let's eat early and have ...
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2answers
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Origin and usage of “nu-” (e.g. nu-metal)

Not every dictionary I checked has "nu-" but here are a few examples: nu- dictionary.com — indicating an updated or modern version of something: nu-metal music Bing — new: new, or modern ...
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Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
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2answers
241 views

Two 'x's in “anti-vaxxer”

I have always found myself impulsively and automatically spelling "anti-vaxxer" with two 'x's, and a Google search indicates that most other media sources did the same; however, I can't ...
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1answer
546 views

What is the word for vocalists singing “out of time”?

I'm not sure if I should post this question here in English Language and Usage or in one of the music-specific forums... The word for (sometimes deliberate) "sour" notes or semitones is "dissonance." ...
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388 views

Part Two: When was “googleable” or “googlable” first used?

Part One Part one is here, and cites references and dates about the verb ‘to google’, and asks about the syllabification and spelling of googl(e)able. Part Two This was originally my second ...
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1answer
135 views

“IoT”: How well understood is this abbreviation, especially when heard, not read? [closed]

How well understood is the abbreviation “IoT” for “Internet of things”? A company has a product, let’s call it the “IoT Refrigerator.” At first glance, I personally had no idea what this “IoT” is. ...
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2answers
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-gate, and gamergate

I have always understood the phrase ____-gate to refer to a controversy or conflict. For example, deflate-gate was the hubbub around whether the Patriots intentionally deflated balls during the AFC ...
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1answer
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when and where is first occurence of word “zap”?

when and where is first occurence of word "zap" ? Online Etymology dictionnary mentions comic strip Buck Rogers but without any precise date or quotation
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1answer
80 views

An English Descriptive Word for Two Words

I'm currently after a synonym for "middle-aged". However, I'm needing the word to be appropriate to describe a non-living thing. Middle-aged is more or less associated with animals and humans, not ...
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1answer
136 views

A word whose suffix is the prefix for another word, so you can combine them?

I'm trying to think of words to be used for usernames and I noticed people sometimes take a word whose suffix matches the prefix of another word and combine them. Noteworthy examples: disarmpit ...
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4answers
408 views

Word for correcting incorrectly?

Is there a word or phrase for when someone corrects another person's statement, which is, in fact, already correct? Sometimes the "correction" can be wrong, or sometimes it can be redundant (as in my ...
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1answer
3k views

Is 'againsting' a [new] word?

The wikipedia article on linguistic competence says: Againsting the syntax-centered view of generative grammar(syntactocentrism), he specifically treats phonology, syntax and semantics as three ...
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3answers
822 views

'Communication" as a verb

I've seen the word 'communication' as a verb. Going by the provenance of the document, I'm reasonably sure that the author meant to use it in this context and that it wasn't a typo. E.g.: How ...
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2answers
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prefix for “possible”, “supposed”, “potential” etc.?

I am looking for a prefix to express the meaning of something possibly belonging to a class / category, or being a candidate for the concept in question. For instance, a "[...]-solution" would be ...
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0answers
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Can “ liquid music” refer to “downloadable music”?

The recent Italian expression “musica liquida” (liquid music) has been used for about a decade now referring to the music which is no longer recorded on traditional devices such as records, CDs or ...
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One who loves science [duplicate]

Would I be off base if I suggested (or created) the word "sciophile"? Meaning "one who loves science".
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It's not 'suicide'. What is it? [closed]

It's not suicide 'Suicide' means suicide, n.1 a. One who dies by his own hand; one who commits self-murder. Also, one who attempts or has a tendency to commit suicide. suicide, n.2 a. The or an act ...
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3answers
17k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
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4answers
457 views

How would you describe an operator which has no fixity? [closed]

Traditionally mathematical operators are either prefix, postfix or infix. All the three forms of notation are equivalent and can be converted from one to another. Formal systems such as programming ...
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2answers
318 views

What would be an apt technical term for the fear of eating cat food?

If there were a technical term for the condition in which a person is irrationally and intensely afraid of inadvertently eating cat food, what would that term be?
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2answers
554 views

'Cromulent' Etymology

Given its first use: "I don't know why, it's a perfectly cromulent word." The verb is "is" (=> it's) and the noun is "word". Since cromulent links them both and directly addresses the noun, isn't ...
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1answer
9k views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he can ...
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1answer
109 views

Opposite of emoji savvy

Is there any word which describes the man who doesn't know how to use emojis
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4answers
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What does “uber-word” mean in particular context (see body of question)?

What does uber-word mean in the following context? This question came up at Is "act like a mensch" too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)? Uber-word came up in this ...
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4answers
32k views

What's a synonym for a passionate person?

What's a word for a passionate person? Like a "passionista", but that of course already has another meaning. Someone that generally has strong desires, goals, or convictions, and works hard to make ...
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1answer
167 views

Term for misused diacritics

Is there a word which describes intentionally misusing or abusing diacritics, in contexts where they are neither needed nor appropriate, for purely stylistic reasons. For example: I submittéd my ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
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2answers
248 views

Is 'botifed' the right word to say humans are behaving more like robots?

From this article: "We generally view the machine/human divide as a one-way street of advancing technology. Machines, we are repeatedly told, are becoming more human-like—but humans are also becoming ...
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2answers
394 views

An antonym for 'sought-after'

Whenever describing something that is seldom looked for or desired I often verbalise it with "ill sought after" without hesitating. (ignore that ill is its own word, the trouble I'm having writing it ...
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2answers
138 views

Product name for service that manages connections [closed]

Looking for a word or catchy phrase that captures the meaning of "connection management". I work for a web-based company that manages APIs (API's are the connective tissue of the Internet of Things). ...
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1answer
61 views

What does “te-thrum” mean?

I'm reading Malcolm Lowry's letters and his first letter to Conrad Aiken finishes like this: te-thrum te-thrum te-thrum te-thrum, Malcolm Lowry Does anyone know what "te-thrum" mean in this ...
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1answer
438 views

Is there a word for people who have shared the same locality?

A "contemporary" is someone who has lived at the same time (more-or-less, anyway) as another person. e.g., Bret Harte (1836-1902) can be said to have been a contemporary of Mark Twain (1835-1910). ...
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2answers
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Sapiosexual without the sexual connotation

I have been hearing the word "sapiosexual" referring to a person attracted to another because of the mental abilities, but attracted not in a sexual way, and I believe "sapiosexual" isn't the most ...
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1answer
230 views

“heart advice” - jarring or beautiful?

I'm translating a Tibetan text written in verse into English. The style is one of direct advice rather than learned philosophy. My aim is for the translation to have the same down-to-earth quality as ...
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2answers
205 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror film,...
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1answer
90 views

What would you call a phobia of endlessly looping GIFs?

When you share a GIF on WhatsApp, it runs in a loop three times and then stops. When you share a GIF on Facebook Messenger, however, it runs in an endless loop. The thought of a GIF running ...
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1answer
132 views

Has the word “manal” (instead of “manual”) ever actually been used? If so, how?

Recently, I've been going through checking how many Latin words ending in -alis have corresponding English words ending in -al. It seems there was a Latin word mānālis meaning "flowing" (as well as a ...
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1answer
165 views

Lexis: How to derive new words by applying affixes to old ones? [closed]

At university I learned the process and some of the details of how to derive new words from old ones using prefixes and suffixes, and how this process makes words change their part of speech, but I ...
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5answers
2k views

Another word for 'replayability' [closed]

Is there another word for 'replayability?' I keep reading that it is not a word; however, the Oxford Dictionaries recognizes it. Thesaurus.com wasn't very helpful either.