Questions tagged [neologisms]

A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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A phrase or neologism which describes obsolete technology-related neologisms

Neologisms and slang that are inspired by technology are increasingly commonplace, e.g.: 'Why don't you just google it?' or 'Text me.' Some of these neologisms leave our lexicon as quickly as they ...
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Is there a technical term for the two halves of an email address? [closed]

Is there a technical name for the two halves of an email address? I mean the parts before and after the @ sign. As a kind of example of what I mean, for UK postcodes, I believe the two halves are ...
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Standalone usage of “tid” from tidbits

Watching an old episode of Home Improvement recently, Eavesdropping Neighbour: I was just hearing some tidbits of your conversation. Tim: Sounds to me like you heard the whole tid. This ...
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Answering a multiple choice question with “yes”

Is there a word and/or neologism that describes the act of answering a multiple choice question with "YES" or "NO" to imply both(none) or either(neither)? Example: Q: Do you like Ice Cream or Frozen ...
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1answer
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The Jackass Syndrome

Some years ago, I watched an episode of the show Just Shoot Me! where one of characters used the phrase "The Jackass Syndrome" to describe the situation were two people who are quite similar in some ...
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Structured pursuit of an aim

Is there an English word that denotes the structured and deliberate pursuit of a course of action in order to achieve a goal?
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Looking for a descriptive word(s)) to describe digest/summation/pocket culture

I am looking for a generic word(s) to describe summary digest cultural of modern society. (or a Neologism) A word(s) for culture that describes "Take what is useful, discard what is useless" ...
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Is there one word that means female car enthusiast? [closed]

There are words like gear head, speedophile, car nut etc. that are all gender neutral, however, I am creating a support group or a common interest linkup for women who have a passion for cars. I am ...
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Word for someone ignorant of, but not expected to be knowledgeable about, something

A discussion arose in our office which brought about remembrance of an old term used by William F. Buckley, Jr. — from his old National Review days — in his "Word of the Day." We can't find the term ...
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What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
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What's a better word to use instead of “nicheification”?

What would be a better word to use than "nicheification"? In the article here, there's one sentence that says Furthermore, when your entire career has been structured around nicheification, there'...
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Is referring to 'Frankenstein's monster' as 'Frankenstein' a neologism?

I just read this question and one of the answers started with "Ordinarily, Frankenstein is a noun referring to a fictional monster" As every nitpicker knows, Frankenstein is the doctor who created ...
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How long have people been swearing in English?

I was looking through my old A-Level English set books from 1989 at the weekend. We had to study the Canterbury Tales and I can still remember our delight when we discovered that 'queynte' was the ...
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Do all “epicene” pronouns mean the same thing as one another?

There have been many pro­posed epicene or gen­der-neu­tral pronouns that have been pro­posed over the years and have re­ceived some level of use. My ques­tion is: do all of them mean the same thing? ...
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Is it brexiteer or brexiter?

The recent facts about the so called Brexit has generated new terms like brexiteer: (politics) Someone who supports Brexit, the United Kingdom's exit from the European Union. Wiktionary ...
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Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda

We are familiar with addendum (and addenda), which we take directly from Latin to mean "something (or things) added" This is used especially in regard to written work such as books. Today I was ...
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What is the English term, when someone provides truthful 'extra' information in support to promote own propaganda?

Though the title asks the main question, I will give an example. Imagine a tabloid, which wants to defame a famous personality, say Abraham Lincoln or Michael Jackson. The writers know that, just ...
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Is “lexophilia” a word?

I've been using the word "lexophilia" for years, but only just realized that it might not actually be in popular use at all. I've even had heated arguments with fellow pedants over the veracity of "...
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How should one pronounce the “rofl” in “roflstomp” or “roflcopter”?

"ROFL" stands for rolling on the floor laughing but has been mushed into other words with their own meanings. Two examples: Ouch, that was a roflstomp. I'm on a roflcopter! While these are ...
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The recent trend of saying the acronym instead of the sentence/phrase is stands for

With the advent of SMS, many common phrases were shortened to WTF, OMG, BTW, etc. And in recent years, with the increased use of these "acronyms", people have started using them in speech too: Saying "...
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How to form a word to represent “drawing quote ideas”?

I'm a graphic designer. I have a project at hand in which I want to draw the underlying concepts in famous quotes. I want to name this project, and I thought of something similar to "quote-drawing". ...
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Has the word “Birtherism” gotten the currency or ‘citizenship’ as the received English?

I found the article titled “Birtherism isn’t dead” in today’s Washington Post. It begins with the following sentence: “Discussion of President Obama’s place of birth died down significantly when he ...
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Word for neologisms derived from the names of fictional characters

Is there a word that refers to or describes the subset of neologisms derived specifically from the names of fictional characters?
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Suggest a collective term for the “shadow people”

In politics, the term controlled opposition describes people who appear to be leaders but who are actually working for the dark side (e.g. corrupt governments or corporate interests). However, there ...
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Different name for the strip of holey paper from a spiral notebook

When students rip out papers from a spiral notebook, the edge has a row of little holes. Unlike when I was young, these pages have perforations running down the right side so that the strips can be ...
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Defining the word Enterpriser [closed]

I have found a word that I would like to use as an alternative to Entrepreneur. The word is "Enterpriser" which appears as a synonym in Google for entrepreneur. In my social/cultural experience '...
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Is there a term for the point in time when a product can begin to use itself?

I know there is the term "dogfooding" and have even found other variations on the phrase "... eat our own dog food": "drinking our own champaign" "eating our own cooking" "ice cream our customers ...
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Is “hardstuck” a neologism? What is its etymology?

I have used the word hardstuck to mean "permanently unable to move". It is a more intense version of stuck, since stuck can sometimes mean "temporarily unable to move" or "unable to move without ...
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difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
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What are the implicit rules for creating new portmanteaux in English?

Wikipedia defines a portmanteau1 as: “Portmanteau word” is used to describe a linguistic blend, namely “a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings....
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982 views

How did 'arching' come into use as a verb meaning 'to thwart'?

I have seen the word 'arch' used as a verb in the context of a villain causing trouble for a hero, or a hero thwarting a villain. It is also used when a villain is actively trying to become a hero's ...
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Whatever happened to “eyeglasses”, “facial tissues”, and “video game consoles”?

Now-a-days, we tend to ask:"Have you seen my glasses anywhere?" "Do you have any spare tissues to lend me?" and "How many consoles do you own?" It's just quicker to say and any native speaker will ...
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A single word for the most important person in one's life

The concept of a "Lebensmensch" plays a dominant role in Thomas Bernhard's works. At Wikipedia one reads that »Lebensmensch [is] a predominantly Austrian term [...] which refers to the most ...
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Word that refers to efforts by people of all religions to develop closer relationships and better understandings

I am looking for a word like ecumenical: Ecumenism refers to efforts by Christians of different Church traditions to develop closer relationships and better understandings. Wikipedia What I want ...
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How does your orange peel?

Increasingly over the last few years, UK supermarkets and grocers have offered us things called 'Easy Peelers' (also easy-peelers, and in one case I've seen, easypeelers). It's a generic term that ...
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Are any senses of the word 'candidate' acceptable for attributive-noun usage?

I've just used 'candidate' attributively to mean '[worth considering as] a real possibility [for the purpose stated, or implied by context] (eg a candidate term or construction). I've not been able ...
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What kind of morphemes do you call -ish and -y? How would you describe their function?

In the context of neologisms and/or teenspeak: e.g. soon-ish, tumblr-y
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331 views

Is “I like!” a recent idiom? What is its origin?

Does it seem to anyone else that in the past few years people have been saying "I like!" in a new, playful, ungrammatical way? I am not plugged in to popular culture so I wonder if some of you could ...
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Neolog / prefix for use with bubble+ology

I want to coin a word that means the study of financial bubbles. After learning that Bubbleology is some kind of metropolitan tea beverage, my immediate hunch of "Bubbleology" lost a great ...
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Is there a term or phrase for the desire for Apocalypse?

I'm researching this for an article I'm writing: is there a term or phrase for the desire for the End Times? Given the preponderance of literature, popular and otherwise, that focuses on the end of ...
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Is there a term for French words adopted by the English language, such as “hors d'oeuvres” or “objet d'art”

I would call them "Frenchisms" or some such -ism, but I figured I'd at least ask first. So is there a name for such adopted foreign phrases? Also, how about those adopted from languages other than ...
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What do you call someone who is obsessed with video games?

I need a slang word which means someone addicted to playing video or computer games. Could gameaholic work? It can't be nerd or geek because although those expressions denote someone who is ...
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Is Administratium an actual word?

We commonly use this word in office, and the definitions point to its meaning. But is this an actual word? It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary.
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What is the English word for “one who composes prayers”?

I remember meeting a priest from Rome who described himself as a [missing word here] which he defined as one who writes prayers. I cannot for the life of me recall or find this word, and I'm starting ...
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Opposite of “granular”

What is the opposite of "granular" in the following usage? granularity The level of detail considered in a model or decision making process. The greater the granularity, the deeper the ...
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What would be a good term for a 'randomness generator' if that term is not suitable?

Dice can be used to generate random numbers, and online many random number generators can be found. However, what if you would have a device that creates non-numerical randomness? Think for instance ...
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How would I write that a threshold is being used on something?

In an algorithm I'm using a threshold to discard certain data samples. The industry refers to this practice as thresholding, which is a neologism and not regarded as an actual word in the English ...
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What is a “foreign fighter”?

I was inspired to ask this question (on ELL) because of something in a CNN article that didn't sound right to me. Per capita, Belgium has the highest number of foreign fighters in Syria of any ...
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Is “dance around” a valid phrasal verb?

I think the idiomatic expresssion “dance around” a subject, an issue meaning, avoid addressing a subject or an issue, is a common metaphor as in: When it comes to money, however, we find lots of ...
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Need a word or expression that represents a category that is the superset of mind, consciousness, experiences, choices, intentions, spirit, etc

I am looking for a word (or expression/phrase), existing if possible or coined-for-the-purpose neologism if not, that represents the all-inclusive superset of a variety of related concepts and ...