Questions tagged [neologisms]

A neologism is a newly coined word or phrase that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language.

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Is there a good term for a 'paper trail' that actually consists of e-mail communication?

I've seen "digital paper trail" and "electronic paper trail", but I'm wondering if there is a better (more elegant, widely used?) term for a record of electronic communication that ...
Ben Bolker's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
955 views

Is "rewardist" a real word/profession?

There's a new TV show called Tracker about a man who goes around the country helping people find missing loved ones. Rather than describing himself as a private investigator, he says he's a "...
Barmar's user avatar
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Sets, setts and settes

In the Oxford English Dictionary, sett and sette are listed as variants of set, and it appears to me, from the links, that such use is attested as from 1387. I want to use sett and sette, in addition ...
Frode Alfson Bjørdal's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Term for a word based on an initialism

I recently came across the word 'geeb', a pronunciation and "wordification" of 'GB', itself an initialism of 'gravity bong'. It reminded me of 'okay', which has a similar relationship with '...
donotread123's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
589 views

Word for nonce antonyms formed by reversing idioms

Someone recently used "on-limits" to describe something that was allowed, i.e. not "off-limits." The same person subsequently described unplugging something as "plugging it ...
Andrew's user avatar
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1 answer
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How common is 'rider' in the sense '[a]n amendment or addition to an entertainer's performance contract'?

I came across a usage of the common word rider on a TV cookery show that I'd never met before. On checking, I found just two online dictionaries with the very specific definition rider [noun] [UK ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
149 views

Is there a word for something that was formerly a social norm but is no longer acceptable?

I've been reading a lot of various classic literature, and at times there is the sort of casual misogyny or racism that was commonplace and (within certain cultures) the social norm at that time. Such ...
oliverseal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
112 views

Is there a term for a button or feature that does not actually do anything, other than giving the user a sense of control?

I was wondering if there was a one-word term for this. I suppose a classic example might be the "Door Close" button on an elevator. Essentially, a working feature that apparently does ...
Kevin Cote's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
101 views

Inspiration catalyst? Looking for a term that describes seemingly out of the blue inspiration

I'm looking for a term for a curious situation that I've found myself in a couple of times. A person discusses a new concept/invention. I am a part of that conversation or simply overhear it. I ...
Lamar Latrell's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
59 views

Has the notion of an addonym - or a word with a similar meaning - been described in the English language before?

Background In the near future, I am planning on publishing my first scientific article as a PhD candidate. My surname is very common in countries like Germany and Austria, and my first name is quite ...
Max Muller's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
114 views

What is the status of logically pointless adjectives and adverbs, such as chairy or chairly? [closed]

Adjectives and adverbs can be formed by adding "y" or "ly" to e.g. a noun, such as: heart -> hearty, heartily However, sometimes these words are not in use, or make no logical ...
curiouser and curiouser's user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
3k views

When did the expression “hustle culture” emerge?

The expression “hustle culture” refers to workplace environments that place an intense focus on productivity, ambition, and success, with little regard for rest, self care, or any sense of work-life ...
user 66974's user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
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Speed Checked By Radar: Synhermeneia?

Is there a word to describe an ambiguous phrase whose alternate meanings all happen to be relevant and true in the context? The example that fascinates me is the road sign "Speed Checked By Radar&...
Purplie's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
49 views

Is “to bottom line” actually gaining traction?

The following extract from grammarist.com suggests that the idiomatic expression “bottom line” is mainly used as a noun but it is increasingly also being used as a verb: By the 1980s, the term the ...
user 66974's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Prospective means future-looking, retrospective means past-looking. What means present-looking?

This is actually two questions. One: is there a word that means present-looking? And: if there isn't, what should the neologism be? Spective? Conspective? Note that although this is a serious question,...
user90664's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
422 views

What does the word "verifactive" mean?

In Introduction to Functional Grammar, in the section on conjunction, Halliday labels the conjuncts "actually", "in fact" and "as a matter of fact" as "verifactive&...
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10 votes
7 answers
2k views

What’s the English for “ecomostro”?

The Italian term “ecomostro” is often used to indicate: an ugly and environmentally damaging building. (Collins) Here is an example: (Linkiesta.it) Is there a term, a neologism for “ecomostro”. In ...
Gio's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
334 views

Opposite of "Smart" electronic devices?

There are many things today that have the term "smart" attached to them. These are most often electronics devices or machines that have embedded computer hardware and software. Some of these ...
Eric Hepperle - CodeSlayer2010's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
68 views

Is there a term for insincere prefacing?

Is there a specific term for the practice of prefacing a statement with another statement that is in contrast (in spirit) to what is being said? There is a related concept called apophasis, where you ...
Philip Mars's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
339 views

Is there a word for people who revel in freebies that isn't pejorative?

I was looking for a word for someone that is really into getting free things, that doesn't necessarily carry a negative connotation. I'd describe them as: that person that shows up to random ...
Stucco's user avatar
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2 answers
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Does 'genocide' cover mass murder of a people by sex or gender? Is there a better word?

Genocide defined: In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical (sic), racial or religious group, ...
Cascabel_StandWithUkraine_'s user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
94 views

Can "coincide" be use transitively?

The New York Times today has an unusual use of "coincide": NYT Looking at common-cold coronaviruses, some researchers have predicted that SARS-CoV-2 will become a seasonal winter infection ...
Anton's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
276 views

Word for someone who abstains from eating mammal-derived foods (meat and milk)

Is there a single word that refers to someone who doesn't eat food derived from mammals? This person would eat fish and other seafood, poultry, eggs, but would not eat the meat of mammals, nor ...
samfrances's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
418 views

How is the singular noun "vote" used compared to the plural "votes"?

Being a big fan of fivethirtyeight.com, and political nerdishness in general, I have repeatedly run into a plural use of the singular nominal 'vote,' most often in the phrase 'percentage of vote.' ...
KECG's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
167 views

Burritoise Vs Burrito?

I was explaining something using an analogy with burritos. If I apply the same burrito analogy to other examples, am I Burritoising those examples or Burritoing them? By analogy, say you were banned ...
AncientSwordRage's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
176 views

Where did the word red-tapism come from?

What is the origin of the word red-tapism? And what does it actually mean? Lexico says it first appeared in the mid-19th century in the Cobbett's Weekly Political Register, a London paper. Searching ...
F. A. Mala's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
678 views

"Not-Noun"s: Neologism or not?

From the title, you can tell that I don't actually know what this phenomenon is called, if it has a name at all, nor if it has already existed for a long time. My own searching has been unhelpful, for ...
916's user avatar
  • 133
56 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is "musset"?

I came across the word "musset" in Gregory Maguire's Wicked-- Her green traveling gown with its inset panels of ochre musset suggested wealth, while the black shawl draping just so about ...
soundandfury's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
157 views

What would the opposite of "orthopedic" be?

So, I'm wondering, what could the opposite of "orthopedic" be? More precisely, if a force is "orthopedic" in nature (so it would give a correct posture), what would a force that ...
lil'lex's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
178 views

Is there a word for pleasing numbers?

Similar to how euphonic describes words that sound pleasing, is there a word for numbers that feel pleasing and comfortable? Like 12:34, $20, or 7.17? I ask because it seems to be an important concept ...
Phoenix Vizva'i's user avatar
20 votes
8 answers
6k views

What’s the English for “democrature”, a dictatorship pretending to be a democracy through fraudulent elections?

The French term democrature (from democratie + dictature) is defined as: Dictature déguisée en démocratie par l’organisation d’élections non libres, contrôlées et/ou frauduleuses. Par extension, tout ...
Gio's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
3k views

Different name for the strip of holey paper from a spiral notebook

When students rip out papers from a spiral notebook, the edge has a row of little holes. Unlike when I was young, these pages have perforations running down the right side so that the strips can be ...
B. Goddard's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Neolog / prefix for use with bubble+ology [closed]

I want to coin a word that means the study of financial bubbles. After learning that Bubbleology is some kind of metropolitan tea beverage, my immediate hunch of "Bubbleology" lost a great ...
Arash Howaida's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Coining a gramatically right word for a newly devised method [duplicate]

I am writing a research paper in which a new method is devised. In this method a mathematical function is rebuilt by combining some conical functions (apexes). Is it grammatically right to name it The ...
Mostafa Saber's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Word to describe a PDF file produced by converting from another format (for example, from HTML)

A month ago, I asked whether it would be correct to call an HTML page saved as PDF file a converted PDF file. "Converted PDF file" - what does it really mean? According to Greybeard, the ...
user90726's user avatar
  • 555
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

What does "te-thrum" mean?

I'm reading Malcolm Lowry's letters and his first letter to Conrad Aiken finishes like this: te-thrum te-thrum te-thrum te-thrum, Malcolm Lowry Does anyone know what "te-thrum" mean in this ...
ovide's user avatar
  • 139
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Is there a term describing countries taking foreign citizens as hostage?

English is my second language, and I am wondering is there a term that describes when countries take foreign citizens or dual citizens as hostage or arrest them on conspiracy/espionage charges all to ...
Node.JS's user avatar
  • 345
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

How far can one go in creating new words?

Apparently the word disturbingly exists, but undisturbingly doesn't. However, I felt it better served to convey my meaning and was sure that any reader would understand what I mean. I also put it ...
fev's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

A toned down term to replace "orthodoxy" in sociology of art

I think this community could help me a lot. In sociology of culture the term orthodoxy refers to ideas held by most and imposed by cultural institutions, so that the "doxa", or opinion, is ...
Fla Brites's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
2k views

Two 'x's in "anti-vaxxer"

I have always found myself impulsively and automatically spelling "anti-vaxxer" with two 'x's, and a Google search indicates that most other media sources did the same; however, I can't ...
Luke Hutchison's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

Why isn't "Verbing" always allowed?

Why are varnish (varnish the truth),gloss (glossed over her faults), and paint (paints him more innocent than the evidence suggests) used metaphorically, but not lacquer?
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
524 views

Use of 'went' as a noun

I have come across its use as a proper noun in an 1895 deed: "...all that one piece of pasture lying at Whatling Went." So I wondered if there is any evidence for the the use of 'went' as ...
Bob Briscoe's user avatar
10 votes
11 answers
3k views

Word or intuitive neologism for "(unhealthy) infatuation with gold"

The easy picks: greed avarice They get the message across, but are too general. I want a word that narrows the meaning to only gold -- not just desire for wealth / material gain. I tried a neologism:...
Arash Howaida's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
120 views

Word for an all seeing society/government type

I'm looking for a word to mean a society or government type where everything is visible or known to everyone, similar to omniscient. For example, if everyone (including government) can see everything ...
Raj's user avatar
  • 267
2 votes
1 answer
152 views

when and where is first occurence of word "zap"?

when and where is first occurence of word "zap" ? Online Etymology dictionnary mentions comic strip Buck Rogers but without any precise date or quotation
Jacques Notaise's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
71 views

Practice of splitting a web article in many chunks

Some sites have the (execrable) custom of splitting a web article in many small chunks. Example: the article starting at https://es.goodtimepost.com/niagara-falls/ is divided in 38 chunks. In each ...
Martín-Blas Pérez Pinilla's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
102 views

Can statues being pulled down in #BlackLivesMatter be called 'iconoclasm'?

During the worldwide protests of #BlackLivesMatter, a large number of statues commemorating colonial conquest in the modern era have been pulled down by protesters. Is it appropriate to call them '...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
154 views

Looking for a descriptive word(s)) to describe digest/summation/pocket culture

I am looking for a generic word(s) to describe summary digest cultural of modern society. (or a Neologism) A word(s) for culture that describes "Take what is useful, discard what is useless" ...
greay's user avatar
  • 182
0 votes
0 answers
55 views

Word for "of or to do with groups"

I appreciate this is somewhat arbitrary, but humour me! I am trying to come up with a term that describes the following... I am working with "groups" of people. This is the informal definition, ...
Xophmeister's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
430 views

Word for shaking elbows (Covid-19 pandemic)

The recent epidemic has made people change a few habits. We no longer shake hands and a few of us touch each other elbows as an alternative practice. Has this kind of salutation a proper name?
Gio's user avatar
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