Questions tagged [names]

Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

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2
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1answer
6k views

What is the possessive form of a singular noun ending with a plural s?

I would tend to treat a company name as singular and would therefore write the possessive form with 's. Now, my company refers to its international operations by placing the country name behind the ...
2
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1answer
84 views

Why it is “the Grinch” but not just Grinch as it's his personal name

We don't use the definite article with personal names, however here....why is it so? Yeah, I know sometimes we can use "the". When it's a person everybody knows about or smth like that. But why it'...
0
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1answer
20k views

First name or last name with “Sir”

If my teacher's first name is Robert and his last name is Dowry, and I have to send him an email, then which of the following will be correct? Dear Sir Dowry, Dear Sir Robert, Dear Sir ...
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1answer
3k views

Mentioning someone's name in 1-to-1 conversation

When only two interlocutors are communicating in a face-to-face or equivalent setup without the need to get the other's attention, there is no necessity to mention the other person's name. Yet ...
12
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1answer
4k views

Is it true that yeast was once called “Godisgoode”?

In this article discussing beer, it is said that in medieval times yeast (possibly only brewer's yeast) was called godisgoode. Is that the case? (Searching on Google sheds very little light on the ...
9
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6answers
1k views

Catchall term for “Junior”, “Senior”, “the late”, “widow”, and the like?

I'm analyzing a bunch of late 16th century Hungarian names, and I need a word for those extra bits that sometimes get appended to names, like junior, senior, the late and the like. My "working title" ...
8
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3answers
9k views

Why is the letter J so common in names of people who go by their initials? [closed]

I've met a number of people who use their initials as a name. Almost all of the ones I've met have a "J" as one of the initials. I've asked a few friends, and so far, anecdotally, it seems that this ...
8
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2answers
13k views

When did we start naming our dogs Rover, and why?

One stereotypical name for a dog is Fido, from the Latin for faithful. Another stereotypical dog-name is Rover. How long has Rover been a common name for a dog in English? Does it have anything to ...
7
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3answers
3k views

What is the origin of using the word “our” preceding a first name when speaking directly to the person so named

In the BBC's Keeping Up Appearences, and Lark Rise to Candleford, "our Rose" and "our Laura" are used in both the third person and second person. The usage seems understandable as a third person ...
6
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4answers
3k views

Objects with no name, like “the Sun”

This morning I was pondering the things in the English language which have not been given a name, such as 'the Sun' or 'the Moon'. These do not seem to fall into the same category as 'the ground' or '...
5
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2answers
3k views

Why is Dolge not a Christian name?

(Note: This might be better suited for a different stack site, but since literature closed, I thought this was the closest related site). I've recently been re-reading Great Expectations, and, in ...
5
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8answers
4k views

Should Philip have P. or Ph. as an initial?

In the context of scientific articles and technical white papers, references to other publications typically include the author’s surname with, depending on the format of the specific publication, ...
4
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1answer
26k views

Use of the definite article before a person's name or pronoun

Hey native English speakers, My question is regarding the use of the definite article before a person's name, as in Realtime with the Bill Maher on HBO (youtu.be/I9HCbOmwndA?t=8m40s) or in the ...
4
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2answers
124k views

What is the name for this “…” punctuation? [closed]

When I am writing, and I want to leave something out, so that it gives an implied effect, I use this: ... What is it called?
4
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3answers
9k views

Where did the name “English” come from?

How is the name for one's own language created?
3
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3answers
14k views

Is there any convention for pronouncing proper nouns?

Is there any convention as to how proper nouns with origins outside English should be pronounced? I have heard claims to the effect that "a proper noun can be pronounced however you wish"; is that ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Announcing married couple

In Boston Legal (TV series) married couples are announced as "Mr and Mrs Ivan Tiggs" or "Mr and Mrs Denny Crane" - including the husbands' first names. Why is that? Is it used commonly or only in ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Sa'ad : Correct spelling in English and French [closed]

We are considering naming our child the Arabic name Sa'ad (سعد). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saad The Arabic spelling has an ع which I am not sure how to spell. I have seen it spelled as Saad which ...
3
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2answers
3k views

What is the correct spelling of the Arabic name سعد in English?

I need help in how to spell the Arabic name (سعد). I previously asked the question Sa'ad : Correct spelling in English and French; however, it got closed. I added a youtube video describing how ...
3
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2answers
19k views

title for 1 year old boy

What will be the title for 1 year old boy? will it be Mr. or Master or anything else I am not aware of? Pre marriage girls are addressed as Miss. and post marriage Mrs. is there anything similar to ...
3
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3answers
10k views

Should I capitalize a person's last name if their name starts with a lower case letter but it's the first word in the sentence? [duplicate]

I'm trying to cite someone in a paper I'm writing whose name is "[First-name] de Soya". In my field it's common to cite papers using the "et al." style ("In their seminal paper, de Soya et al. […] ...
2
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1answer
114 views

Pluralizing a last name: Soloniewicz's, Soloniewiczs, Soloniewiczes? [duplicate]

Say my last name is Soloniewicz and I'm writing a holiday card. Is it: Happy holidays from the Soloniewicz's Happy holidays from the Soloniewiczs Happy holidays from the Soloniewiczes I'm leaning ...
1
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1answer
120 views

Looking for an appropriate English name to replace my Chinese name [closed]

Background: I am Chinese, and after living abroad from China for several years, I realize that I need an English name anyway. I’ve seen too many confused faces looking at my Chinese name. My Chinese ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Surname plural, Wolf becomes The Wolves? [duplicate]

The Simpson family becomes The Simpsons, does that mean I can call a family with surname Wolf, The Wolves or The Wolfs? I don't know if changing letters of someone's surname is appropriate or not.
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3answers
2k views

Usage of the definite articles with personal names

Could you tell me if the following sentence is correct or not? It seems to me that it is not correct because as I know, definite articles are never used with personal names. The only thing that I ...
1
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1answer
25k views

Does the “@” symbol have a name? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to pronounce @ symbol? In Spanish, @ is called arroba. I saw this question, and it says it's called "commercial at" according to Wikipedia. A lot of languages have a ...
1
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0answers
1k views

Proper Usage of Nicknames?

I’m already aware that nicknames are usually incorporated into the larger name between the first and last names — John “Jack” Doe, for example — and that this is essentially standard usage. When you ...
1
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2answers
162 views

Which article is used between a “name” and a “tagline” [closed]

Suppose, I am selling a new product named as: "Innob" and there is a tagline followed by it: "___, new breath in (the) town". Which article shall I use between the name and the tagline ("the" vs "a/...
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2answers
1k views

Is the title of a US President permanent? [duplicate]

Ultimately I'm wondering whether the descriptive in "former President [Name]" is superfluous or necessary in everyday usage, such as when talking to an audience who knows who the current president is.
1
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1answer
107 views

“Knows an awful lot about the Dark Arts, Snape”

He teaches Potions, but he doesn't want to—everyone knows he's after Quirrell's job. Knows an awful lot about the Dark Arts, Snape. From time to time I stumble upon this type of speech with comma + ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Is it OK to put last name before first name if the name comes from a culture with such a feature? [closed]

I have recently noticed that my first name goes after my last name in my Stack Exchange account. In my native language (Russian) it is OK to put them in any order. How shall I put my name in English (...
0
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2answers
131 views

How to describe the practice of using “am-pluh-fi-key-shun” to indicate it's pronouncation? [duplicate]

For instance, if we use [,æmplɪfɪ'keɪʃən] [,æmpləfə'keʃən] to indicate how to read "amplification", the practice is called phonetic notation or phonetic transcription, and the symbol is called ...
0
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2answers
3k views

How to pronounce English names quickly and correctly [closed]

How can you pronounce a name quickly and correctly? They may or may not conform to regular patterns. Currently I'm using "online website" to do the speaking each time. Are there any shortcuts that I ...
0
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1answer
3k views

Is there a rule to what ending you use when you construct the nationality adjective? Or where did the various endings come from? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries? In the English language, you have several endings used when you construct an adjective out of the ...
-2
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1answer
850 views

Correct pronunciation of the word “Radchaai” [closed]

I'm currently reading the wonderful novel "Ancillary Justice" by Ann Leckie, and there's a political force who's name is "Radch" and everything that belongs to them is said to be &...

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