Questions tagged [names]

Topics related to given names, surnames, and linguistic aspects of naming in English.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
2answers
182 views

What is the preferable wording for that situation?

During my vacation, I have worked on a scientific project. Now, I would like to add this project to my resume. So, I have added the following to my resume. 1- Volunteer scientific work: ...
3
votes
4answers
18k views

Name Pronunciation with Apostrophes

I was trying to understand how to properly pronounce certain names. My teaching has said words and names with apostrophes require a separation for a missing letter, like O'Malley would be pronounced ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

In the field (field name) or in field (field name)? [closed]

When we describe a field on a screen, should we use "the" before the name of that field? Enter a value in the (field name) field. For example: Enter your name in the Name field. OR Enter a ...
1
vote
2answers
176 views

Is there a word for when you use a descriptor in place for a word/phrase you've forgotten?

Best example I can give is a post I saw a while back where someone was trying to remember the name for a manta ray and described it as a sea pancake instead. Logically you could call it a sea pancake ...
4
votes
6answers
5k views

Can last names be shortened just as first names?

I know first names are usually shortened in verbal communication for reasons that I am not clear about. For example, Andrew becomes Andy. But is it also the case for last names? If yes, what is the ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

When a last name contains “Saint”, is it ever spelled out, or is it always “St.”?

When a last name contains "Saint", such as Richard St. Paul, how does "Saint" show up on this person's legal documents etc.? Is their legal name "Richard Saint Paul", &...
-1
votes
2answers
49 views

As family name unambiguous defines surname versus last name what name should be used for social friendly name [closed]

In many parts of the world the sequence of first name and surname is not always the same and can cause misunderstanding what should be given. As family name unambiguous defines surname or last name ...
0
votes
1answer
807 views

Should I use “the John” or “the john” when referring to the slang phrase for toilet?

Should I capitalize the "j" in John when referring to a toilet as "the john." The same goes for lazy Susan and other words that are also names.
2
votes
2answers
454 views

Is there a word for when something's name completely fits the description or personality? [duplicate]

for example in a story i'm writing, there is a character named Revenge who's main goal is to get revenge. Is there a single word for that?
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Is there a word for using basic phonetics to teach someone your name's correct pronunciation?

For instance, if my name was Rehana then I'd tell them my name is pronounced like ray as in a ray of sunshine, hana as in Hannah. Is there an easier way to explain how I'm simplifying my name for ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

When does it feel more natural to have articles in names?

In my observations, names usually don't have articles like the, a, an. For example: Stack Exchange (not The Stack Exchange); Facebook, (not The Facebook). However: There are cases when the name ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Is there a specific title for wizards?

I'm writing a fantasy story and I have a wizard in it. His name's Brad, and I'm wondering how a magical figure like him should be addressed. Mr. Brad seems a little lackluster, and Sir Brad wouldn't ...
5
votes
7answers
11k views

How to write Vietnamese names in English correctly? (“Việt Nam” to “Vietnam” or “Viet Nam”?)

Commonly, in writing, the country name in Vietnamese is Việt Nam, in English is Vietnam; its capital city name in Vietnamese is Hà Nội, in English is Hanoi; its largest city name in Vietnamese is ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

What are historical reasons why the US people put initial in between their first and last names? [closed]

As far as I know it is not mandatory form of the full name, but many Americans (I reckon it is true for other English speaking nations, but it is much more typical for people in the US) choose to ...
4
votes
1answer
73 views

Omis­si­bil­ity of the defi­n­ite ar­ti­cle “the” be­fore at­tribu­tive mod­i­fiers of per­sonal names in Amer­i­can English

Are both in­clu­sion and omis­sion of the defi­n­ite ar­ti­cle the be­fore per­sonal names that have at­tribu­tive mod­i­fiers (nom­i­nal or ad­jec­ti­val or both) con­sid­ered gram­mat­i­cal in Amer­i­...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the name for a torture device that uses electricity to make the victim suffer?

What is the name for a torture device that uses electricity to make the victim suffer? Not as powerful as an electric chair that kills the victim outright but something which makes him suffer for a ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

In what order should you say people's names?

I know that when you include someone, you say their name first. For example: John and I went to the beach. How do you order the names when there are more than one additional people? For example: ...
0
votes
0answers
74 views

Is it okay to write/enforce “Parent(s)” instead of “Parent” &/or “Parents”, w/ the s in paren, to explicitly specify I do not say if 1 or 2 parents?

Options: A) Parent(s) / Parent[s] / Parent{s} B) Parents C) Parent I think the question title is my entire question, I do not mean to be rude just clear (just I am being pretty powerfully judged/...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

How widespread is the usage of Senior, Junior, III in British English?

Upon asking about the Spanish equivalences of Senior, Junior and III, I got to know that these are commonly used in United States, but not that much in Britain. Talking about the United Kingdom, a ...
0
votes
0answers
95 views

How do unisex names come about in English?

TL;DR How do unisex names develop amidst, or out of, gendered ones in English (and other languages)? Detail In English, many (most?) names have a gender assignment of male or female. However, some are ...
3
votes
4answers
29k views

When is it appropriate to refer to someone as Dr. [Surname]?

I know that the title Dr. is often used to refer to those who practice medicine. For example, today I am going to see Dr. [Surname]. But are we in general expected to use the title when we refer to ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

How to indicate middle name is preferred name in professional email signature

In almost all situations, I prefer to be addressed by my legal middle name. However, in the email signature (what's automatically included at the bottom of the email) of my university email, I must ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

What do you call someone who doesn't observe details?

My mom is so ... that I had to explain that I was being sarcastic.
-2
votes
1answer
849 views

Correct pronunciation of the word “Radchaai” [closed]

I'm currently reading the wonderful novel "Ancillary Justice" by Ann Leckie, and there's a political force who's name is "Radch" and everything that belongs to them is said to be &...
4
votes
5answers
3k views

Word for the sun appearing after rain at dusk?

It has been raining for the whole day. At dusk, the rain stops and the sun comes out of the cloud. The sky is painted with a soft color of a mixture of red and orange which looks very beautiful. With ...
1
vote
1answer
120 views

Looking for an appropriate English name to replace my Chinese name [closed]

Background: I am Chinese, and after living abroad from China for several years, I realize that I need an English name anyway. I’ve seen too many confused faces looking at my Chinese name. My Chinese ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Finding Meanings of English Names [duplicate]

In Sinhala the name Suminda means calm disposition from the words Samya (calm) + Indu (faculties). In the case of English, how does one understand the meaning of names? E.g. names like Ann, Tom, Dick, ...
4
votes
1answer
101 views

First use of "jack-o'-Lantern” in reference to the Carved-Pumpkin?

According to OED the etymology of "Jack'o'-Lantern" (as a name for the carved pumpkin) dates to 1834: Jack-o'-lantern: also jack-o-lantern, jack-a-lantern, jackolantern, 1660s, "night-...
-1
votes
2answers
125 views

English Pronunciation of name “Claire” [closed]

I got into a debate about whether I can pronounce "Claire" as "Clara" or not. Please help me if I can do the same or not, or is there any rule in the English language which says ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Is it OK to put last name before first name if the name comes from a culture with such a feature? [closed]

I have recently noticed that my first name goes after my last name in my Stack Exchange account. In my native language (Russian) it is OK to put them in any order. How shall I put my name in English (...
1
vote
2answers
11k views

Quotation marks for nicknames

E.g. "I get called Hitler in school." or "I get called 'Hitler' in school."? Would quotation marks be needed for 'Hitler'? What if it was an uncommon or nonsensical word like 'A123' or 'Gaylord'. ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Should we include the prefix Mrs. when we tell others our real name? [closed]

My question is so simple. We call a man with the prefix Mr. and a married woman with the prefix Mrs., followed by her husband's surname, right? Now, is it grammatically okay to include these prefixes ...
1
vote
2answers
255 views

Plural of East European surnames

Would the collective noun for the Ivanovic family be "Ivanoviches"? I called the Invanoviches for confirmation.
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Grammatical names and function

What is the grammatical name and function of the italicised expression in the sentence She communicated gladly with a man who was going to see his son in Lagos and they exchanged numbers.
0
votes
0answers
32 views

What is the proper way to use commas when addressing two or more people by placing their names at the start of the sentence?

I frequently need to address multiple people in writing at work. This is usually done in a way that makes it convenient to at them all at once. E.g. @dale, @emily, please take a look at this and, if ...
-2
votes
1answer
73 views

What is the meaning of gim boy?

I received an e-mail from Spotify Customer Support a few months ago. They ended the email with the following: "Looking forward to hearing from you. Let us know if you have other questions or ...
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

What's a girl's name meaning mixed emotions?

Does anyone know a girl's name meaning mixed emotions? I want to use it for a character I'm writing about. I also want it to sound cutesy and wholesome (something that rolls off the tongue easily). ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What's a word for someone you haven't seen in a long time?

What's a word for someone that I haven't seen in a long time? I remember one person saying: "Oh, wow! I think I'm seeing a ghost. I can't believe it's you!" But I'm not so sure if "...
-4
votes
3answers
229 views

Referring to professors as “Dr.” in news articles and other formal wrtiting

In academia, "professor" is generally acknowledged as being a higher title than "doctor", as few PhD holders are professors, while basically all professors hold a PhD (RIP Freeman ...
5
votes
2answers
9k views

How should title and suffix appear when writing last name first?

It's common in business to list persons in order of last-name-first. Instead of "John W. Van Dyk", write "Van Dyk, John W.". But what should be the convention when the name has a title or suffix. ...
1
vote
3answers
80 views

Is there a word for the commonly used given name of a person?

In Swedish we have the word tilltalsnamn (addressing name) which is one of the given names used when referring to a person. This name may or may not be the first among the given names. So a person ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

How can I speak English fluently in 45 days? [closed]

I am new to start learning English. I want to improve my reading, writing & speaking english I have only 45 days to complete this course. Where I start learning. I am searching online for videos, ...
8
votes
8answers
23k views

Is using the last name of a person without a title an accepted way of addressing?

I always heard people use Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms before people's names and that is how, I thought, it was done until I watched one of those Harry Potter films in which Malfoy (Sr) addresses Albus Dumbledore ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Could Arkansas be considered an “Arch Kansas”? [closed]

The prefix arch- means "super" or "stronger than normal" as in the word archenemy. I looked up the etymology of the word Kansas. It said that it is an ethnonym meaning "people of the south wind". ...
-1
votes
3answers
67 views

Brand name — how does it sound to American ears? [closed]

I work for a European tech start-up, and we are currently choosing a brand name for the US market. We obviously want the name to be unique, succinct, and memorable, but most importantly we want it to ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Addressing a person by their last name only [closed]

I've seen a couple of instances where someone is addressed exclusively by their last name (not like "Mr. X" but only "X"). The most prominent example is perhaps MacGyver, whose first name (Angus) is ...
-1
votes
1answer
115 views

How should this nickname for Adelaide be spelled? [closed]

Say you're writing a book, and a character calls another character this nickname for Adelaide. How should it be spelled? Lady Laidy Laidey Laidie Addelaide is an old name, so wondering if there's a ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

The name Emmaculate

The name on my birth certificate is Emmaculate. I am not sure if it was a typo, but i love it that way. I have been looking up name meanings and apparently it has no meaning. What does Emmaculate ...
3
votes
3answers
76k views

What's the right way to pronounce “Louis”?

The name of the comedian Louis C.K. is pronounced LU-EE-SEE-KAY. Is the S pronounced as a part of the given name "Louis", or just the first constant of the of the letter C? Is there a canonical way ...
3
votes
3answers
199 views

Is there a name for the relationship between a movement and a follower of that movement?

Movements and philosophies often have a specific term that is used to describe followers of it. For example, Islam and Muslims, the Society of Jesus and Jesuits, Communism and Communists, even the ...

1
2 3 4 5
10