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Questions tagged [morphology]

Questions regarding morphemes (smallest semantically meaningful units in a language) such as words, affixes, parts of speech, intonation/stress, or implied context.

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61 views

Does English have any other cognate examples? [closed]

Does English have other cognate examples? wheat, white heat, hot deep, dip road, ride food, feed full, fill
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2answers
89 views

employ, employer, employee - can I generalize this pattern to (verb), (verb)er, (verb)ee? [duplicate]

As a non-native speaking programmer, I need a general pattern to name input and output variables of operations where the variables are of the same type and I noticed that employ, employer employee is ...
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1answer
207 views

Add -al to verb to make a noun

Do you have any examples of nouns that are formed by adding -al to a verb? I can think of one example (rental), but would like to have a few more. Thank you for your help!
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1answer
63 views

noble - can it be split into morphemes?

Can I split noble into nob + the suffix -le? -le is found in other adjectives such as little, brittle, fickle nob is found in noble, nobleman, nobleness, nobler, noblesse, noblest, nobly. But ...
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2answers
52 views

X vs. X-al adjectives (asymptotic vs asymptotical, etc.)

Right now I am writing a technical report, where I describe asymptotic(al) curves, expansions etc. My understanding after a bit of web browsing is that asymptotic and asymptotical are near-synonymous ...
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1answer
46 views

Is 'non-work' a word?

I'm working in a big company with lots of employees. We have 'Skype for business application with which we communicate and interact with each other . I want to update my status to something like: I'...
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0answers
119 views

Is the affix/root/combining-form model necessary to understand medical terminology?

I am learning medical terminology. My medical terminology textbook has me confused about roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. As a neophyte to morphology, I am trying to understand why it ...
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3answers
448 views

Why is 'hyper-' considered a prefix, but 'tachy-' is considered a combining form?

I am learning medical terminology. My medical terminology textbook has me all confused about roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms; so I have been doing some research. I've found that most ...
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1answer
52 views

Is it explosive dog or explosives dog?

I can't seem to find a justification either way for this example. Can anyone help me out? Thank you! In the context of a bomb-sniffing dog, what grammar rule would justify using the (s)? Is it simply ...
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1answer
89 views

What does “-t” in “bight” mean? [closed]

Wiktionary says, that "-t" in "bight" is a variant of "-th" suffix (bight = bought = bough + t) but I think, that "-t" in "bight" is an Old English past participle ending of "bow". Is my hypothesis ...
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2answers
137 views

The root word of hospitability

I am taking morphology class this semester but I am confused with something. What is the root of the word hospitable? When I searched in internet I conclude that the root is the word host or at least ...
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1answer
157 views

Phonetic differences between ɑ and ɒ in English and American pronunciation standards

First, I should state I'm a native U.K. English speaker from the West Midlands. With 44 Phonemes present in English, I'm having trouble deciding when I should use ɑ and ɒ, from this website we can ...
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1answer
139 views

How can you determine whether a word with the pseudo- prefix should be hyphenated?

I am in a bit of a quandary over conflicting results in dictionary entries about the inclusion of a hyphen in some of the words containing the pseudo- prefix. An example of one of these words is ...
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1answer
54 views

Multimedia disambiguation

This sentence is from Wikipedia: A website is a collection of related web pages, including multimedia content, typically identified with a common name, and published on at least one web server. Is ...
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3answers
1k views

Why are dictionary transcriptions contradictory for the phonetic representation of oranges?

I am a native U.K. speaker with a strong Midlands dialect, and I am very aware of other dialects and regional accents from around the world of English speakers, and I really enjoy this. I am a data ...
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1answer
319 views

How many morphemes in words most/worst

My intuition tells me that they are both 2 morphemes, where /t/ represents the superlative form.
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1answer
153 views

What is the difference between -en and {-en} in morphology notation?

So there is this question of the example: The referee has blown his whistle many times today. The question of the example above is, "What type of allomorph is in the past participle form of the word ...
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2answers
783 views

Why isn't 'oranger' correct even though it follows being a one- or two-syllable word for adding the comparative inflection?

So 'orange' is either can be a one- or two-syllable word, however it would incorrect to say something is "oranger". But why? It follows the rule of being adding the comparative {-er} but it is not ...
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2answers
447 views

How do you split “cities” into morphemes?

Would it be "cit/ies" or "citie/s"? I'm just starting morphology and I got confused about it.
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1answer
91 views

correct interpretation/understanding of this sentence

I have the following 2 sentences: 1- I did not see any other classmates, except/but Michael. 2- I did not see any classmates, except/but Michael For the first sentence can we understand that the ...
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20answers
27k views

Words with “bi-” prefix that no longer mean “two”

Are there words in English that include the prefix bi- whose current usage includes meanings other than 'two'? To clarify, I am specifically looking for the prefix of Latin origin meaning "two". If ...
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1answer
123 views

Morphology, conversion type confusion! [closed]

I am currently doing an assignment. I am having difficulty understanding this phenomenon. If the verb "taking" is in a passage would it be considered a conversion process, as "taking" can also be a ...
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1answer
1k views

Is “-ed” an inflectional or derivational morpheme in “the stressed syllables”?

In the word "stressed" in the following sentence, is the -ed an Inflectional or a Derivational suffix? Would you please explain to me why? The sentence is: This is one of the stressed syllables. ...
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1answer
346 views

What is the root ? It seems like it is all suffixes and prefixes?

What is the root of the word: Conversation I think it is "Converse" but I am not sure. Thank you
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2answers
835 views

Would you please explain to me the morphology of the word retroviral?

I cannot understand the morphology of the word retroviral. is "re" the prefix? I think the prefix might be retro, is that true? is "al the suffix? I am assuming that "viral" is the root, is ...
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1answer
178 views

who(m):whose::who(m)ever:?

I am actually asking about the spelling of this word, not whether it exists... which in fact makes it rather difficult to write about. I will spell it as "whoever's" for the purpose of explaining the ...
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2answers
3k views

What is /iə/ in English?

I am confusing with phonetic symbols between /iə/ and /ɪə/. I know that /ɪə/ is a diphthong vowel, combining between /ɪ/ and schwa /ə/. But what is /iə/? Is it /i:/+/ə/? How different are they ...
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1answer
1k views

How many morphemes in 'during'? [closed]

Is 'during' one morpheme or is it something like DURATION+ continuity?
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2answers
123 views

Usurpation without “Usurpate”

It seems to me somehow odd to have Usurpation without having a corresponding Usurpate. I know about back-formation, but in that case both words are present. Am I missing something? Are there more ...
2
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2answers
187 views

Which is the more etymologically accurate form, “cyberocracy” or “cybercracy”?

In bibliographical sources, the term "cyberocracy" is the one used mostly but it makes more sense to me the term "cybercracy". So I would like to know which of the two is more accurate etymologically.
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2answers
141 views

What does the noun “Hawaiian” really mean in English? [closed]

Headlines this morning (Saturday 1/13/2018) proclaimed that "Hawaiians woke up to emergency alerts" on mobile phones that a missile strike might be incoming. But no local news source here in Hawaii ...
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2answers
847 views

Why is it that people have started to use an interrogative sentence form when not asking a question in American English?

I'm not sure if this is something recent, although I've been noticing it much more frequently now than say a couple of years ago. Many times people will make a statement, but will have it in an ...
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2answers
4k views

Does adding the suffix “ality” to a noun change its meaning?

I thought that -ality was used to turn an adjective into a noun : bestial to beastiality, final to finality. But I see that some people add it onto the end of nouns : criminal to criminality, ...
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1answer
1k views

Is it physics’s or physics’? [duplicate]

For a sentence such as "physics’ greatest...", would you use physics’s or physics’ ? Microsoft Word highlights physics's as incorrect; however, I have seen it be used.
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2answers
3k views

“The species/species'/species's survival…”

Ok, I am really confused regarding apostrophe with the s and the end of the word. I have looked through multiple sites only to see multiple viewpoints. And, on tests they test it differently. So, can ...
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2answers
6k views

What is the comparative form of “tense”?

According to Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Macmillian English Dictionary, the comparative form of "tense" should be "tenser", but I find such an example in Oxford Dictionary: "The ...
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0answers
339 views

Emphatic “do” with “used to” [duplicate]

I did use to live in London. I did used to live in London. Which one is correct? According to the usage of emphatic do with past tense (eg "I lived in London/I did live in London"), did should ...
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2answers
558 views

Altitude, longitude, latitude, and probably multitude

It seems that latitude, longitude, and altitude should be composed of two constituents, since they all describe a geographical attribute, and all end with "tude". However searching their etymology in ...
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1answer
98 views

Are words like “heroical” and “empirical” morphologically redundant?

According to the big Oxford and the online dictionary, the following pairs are concurrent: heroic and heroical; empiric and empirical Aren't the second forms morphologically redundant? Heroic ...
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2answers
342 views

Why does the preterite of verbs such as “deal”, “feel” and “dream” have a devoiced dental suffix?

I am trying to explain the morphology of some irregular weak verbs. I could explain "leave-left" as the result of assimilation with v being originally intervocalic f, but I can't see the reason for ...
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1answer
896 views

Lately vs. Recently lesson plan

I am currently taking linguistics and am required to tutor a student based on errors within a writing sample she has provided me. Currently, I am developing activities for determining when to use ...
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2answers
606 views

“Here”, “there”, and “where”

Are "here", "there", and "where" morphological cognates, or just an orthographic coincidence?
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1answer
1k views

Why are “malign” and “malignant” pronounced differently? [duplicate]

Why are malign and malignant pronounced differently? What is the rule that separates that pattern from, say, sign and signage?
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2answers
162 views

Why is -o- used to connect demographic entities?

Consider Indo-China, Indo-US, Indo-European, Afro-American, Sino-American. Why is O used to connect the two areas ?
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2answers
887 views

What's the meaning of the suffix “nimity”?

I have been researching online for the suffix nimity in the English words equanimity and unanimity but with no clear results. I have found the suffix ity but couldn't find the whole suffix nimity. ...
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2answers
5k views

What exactly is a lexeme?

In different books, I've encountered different examples: LEAVE - leave, leaves, left, and leaving TAKE - take, takes, took, taken and taking BANK- the shore of a river and a particular kind of ...
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1answer
3k views

“Lip-sync” or “Lip-synch”?

What is the correct spelling of the expression "lip sync[h]," which refers to miming singing over a recording--usually in a public performance and with the intention to mislead? Google has ...
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3answers
701 views

How do I decide whether I should spell the word “idolator” or “idolater”?

How do I decide whether I should spell the word "idolator" or "idolater"? Apparently, both are considered acceptable forms of the same word, so how do I determine which spelling I should use?
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1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “excitement” and “excitation”?

I know that the first one is usually used for describing emotional state and the second one in science e.g. in physics. But why are these words different and what is the logic behind each of these ...
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0answers
1k views

Variations of the same word

Here is a question for you guys. Im trying to find a good website or whatever place that can show me all forms of a specific word. For example the word "transparent" has other morphologies like "...