Questions tagged [modifiers]

Questions about modifiers.

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Does the dangling modifier thing apply?

I have a persistent question concerning grammar that I would really like your help on. It has been nagging me for a long time. So, as we all know, if you start a sentence with -ing, the first word of ...
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81 views

When a noun phrase can act as the post-modifier?

According to Oxford Learner's Grammar by John Eastwood [ISBN:0-19-437-597-8], page 187; it is possible for a noun phrase to act as a postmodifier of the head noun. Example: The weather that day was ...
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123 views

Is the relative clause always an adjunct/modifier of the antecedent?

The first two sentences mean the same thing, and so do the last two. (1) She's obviously the person to finish the job. (1') She's obviously the person who should finish the job. (2) She was the first ...
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43 views

Hear it used this way? - Complement or Modifier

While writing the following sentence I was curious whether the sentence was correct. But after checking COCA, I came to now that similar expressions are in use. The sentence I wrote is: Have you ...
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552 views

Rules on noun+noun structures

Although there are plenty of grammar topics that I occasionally struggle with, there is one that causes the most trouble. Lately, I have been writing a lot of technical instructions and manuals, in ...
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54 views

Word for collective followers of Sisyphus

I am looking for a single word to describe the group of followers of Sisyphus (or generally any Greek name ending in '-phus'). I am unsure of how to modify the word to achieve this. Possible guesses: ...
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49 views

How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
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92 views

'As a result of' Usage

As a result of seems to be quite a versatile phrase, and I can't entirely figure out the contexts in which it is used. This statement is apparently wrong: Sound can travel through water for ...
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212 views

complement vs adjunct/modifier

In the following noun phrase, is the prepositional phrase from Lloyds complement or adjunct/modifier? even all the preposterous salary from Lloyds that Bill gets The Cambridge Grammar of The ...
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55 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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55 views

Can a prepositional phrase modify a noun when there is a verb between the noun and the prepositional phrase?

For example, Forecasts have emerged of heavy rain. A structurally sound argument was presented of the characteristics and implications of economic recessions. Is the prepositional phrase modifying &...
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1answer
76 views

"Personal Use Program" or "Personal-Use Program"?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
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111 views

a verb phrase acting as a complement of a noun

In a noun phrase (NP), a verb phrase (VP) can act as a complement of a noun as follows: OPEC's decision to cut production by more than 1.5m barrels a day the option to replace you with your legal ...
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44 views

How is Mark Nichol using the term "free modifier"?

In 8 types of parenthetical phrases, he includes Free modifier: A free modifier is an unspecialized interruption of additional information: “I stood up and, brushing off my pants, continued ...
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47 views

Usage of an article when one adjective modifies two nouns

I want to say 'a specific method' and 'a specific parameter'. I actually want to express I use a general method that can be determined by the operator instead of a specific annealing algorithm, ...
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1answer
20 views

How would you punctuate this?

I've come across a heading I don't know how to punctuate: 10 Questions for Betty Smith – Author, Chocolate and Money Lover Obviously she is a lover of chocolate and money, but am not sure how/...
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2answers
253 views

In “We’re going to throw a surprise party for her”, is "for her" an adjectival phrase or an adverbial phrase?

Consider these sentences: We’re going to throw a surprise party for her. I’ll get some flowers for Anne. In (1) for her is a prepositional phrase. Is this instance of for her an adjectival ...
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1answer
465 views

Is a determiner a complement or a modifier of a noun?

The determiner such as the definite/indefinite article can come before a noun. Is the determiner a complement or a modifier of a noun?
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1answer
482 views

I have difficulty using long subject

It is hard to use long noun phrase subject. I hope to make it easy to read. For example, The relation between luminance and pupil area under dynamic condition will be computed. In this case, ...
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1answer
80 views

Can an adjective modify the entire sentence?

I came across the following sentence, and I was so curious about “effective next Monday.” Mr. Michael has resigned his position as senior sales manager, effective next Monday. Effective is ...
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2answers
44 views

Can appositives rename a verb?

While researching, I discovered the existence of 'summative' and 'resumptive' modifiers, which are both types of appositive. For context, here is an example of a summative modifier: He saw the ...
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46 views

Struggling to look at grammatical modifiers

I have a passion for English, and I am trying to improve my fluency day by day. Today, I am quite confused when my teacher, a non-native speaker of English, tells me that a sentence in my essay is ...
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2answers
70 views

"To comprehend x, it is necessary to understand y." Is this a dangling modifier?

Because I often think of sentences in the "we must"-form, as in: "To comprehend x, we must first understand y." when I write things that demand I do not write "we," I ...
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19 views

Can abbreviations be used as stand-alone adjectives when the abbreviated term couldn't?

I see by your name that you are probably ESL... ESL stands for "English as a second language". In the above sentence, it is being used as a stand-alone adjective, but I'm not sure if that ...
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31 views

Multiple non-restrictive modifiers in one sentence

Consider the following sentence: "I have not sent any further communication, since the email, to your office, so far." Would both the phrases "since the email" and "to your ...
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24 views

Schoolchildren population or schoolchild population?

Although we are taught to use singular adjectives to modify nouns, "schoolchildren" population seems to be a more commonly heard and searched (Google) option than the true singular "...
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2answers
120 views

declining reputation, worsening reputation

I am trying to write a two-word phrase. The second word is "reputation." The first word is a modifier; it will signal that a reputation is getting worse. "Worsening reputation" ...
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49 views

Why is "more complicated" typically not hyphenated as a compound modifier when before a noun?

In the phrase "employees for more complicated work," shouldn't "more complicated" be hyphenated as it comes before the noun it describes? After much searching online, I am yet to ...
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23 views

Modifying nouns without relative pronouns or relative adverbs

Do those sentences below sound natural? 1.She’s got that hair the color of chestnut.(Modified by the objective) 2.I looked in the mirror the size of my two hands.(Modifies by the objective) 3.I saw ...
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31 views

Modifying a whole list of nouns by attaching modifier to the first noun only

With sentences like: I visited the parks in the area, museums, and shops. We enjoyed dancing on our wedding day, chatting to guests, and listening to the band. He spoke to all the boys in the ...
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35 views

"the lady's thumb" or "lady's thumb"

According to the encyclopedical manner (and what COBUILD advises too), we should put an article, be it definite or indefinite, before the name of a plant. A rose is a plant… The coconut tree is a ...
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53 views

Make sure you invite Jill herself(,) <too> [The syntactic function of 'too' and usage of comma]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 438-9) has this: An NP may contain more than one peripheral modifier, with multiple layers of embedding: [8] i Make sure you invite [Jill herself ...
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34 views

Present participle, gerund, or modifier

Which one of the following is right? 1) I am a doctor working in a hospital. 2) I am, a doctor, working in a hospital. 3) I am a doctor, working in a hospital. Does "working" modify "doctor" in ...
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33 views

Which sentence structure is correct and why?

I have typed nearly all the sentences. I nearly have typed all the sentences. Also, do I need to add the preposition 'of' to the sentence? E.g. "I have nearly typed all of the sentences."
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122 views

fused relative word (whatever, whoever) + the hell/on earth

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has presented five reasons for classifying ungoverned open exhaustive conditionals not as fused relatives but as open interrogatives, and the fourth ...
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49 views

Participial Phrase as Verb Modifier?

On the internet, I only read about participial phrases acting as noun modifiers. But when I read various newspaper articles, it seems that participial phrases are also used as verb modifiers, or even ...
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28 views

Activist vs. Activism

What is the difference between "activist" and "activism" when they are used as modifiers? What is correct - "activist project" or "activism project"?
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53 views

"there exists" or "S exists"

In the formal writing such as a conference/journal paper, which of the following two phrases are correct? there exists noun Noun exists In addition, can we use the following phrases to modify the ...
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51 views

What gets modified? Confusions with "only" (basic categorical logic)

While learning basic categorical logic, I came across the following sentences: "All kitchens are places for eating" "All kitchens are only places for eating" "All kitchens are places only for eating" ...
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97 views

complicated / complex and possible modifiers

A text I wrote (well, translated actually) contained the phrase: "the question is highly complex". After more than a year (!) it's been returned to me with some corrections, and the phrase above ...
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609 views

Modifiers used to modify whole clauses/sentences - Any additional examples?

I've been interested recently in modifiers that modify not a specific grammatical unit--e.g., nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, or phrases of each--but an entire sentence or clause. For example, see ...
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515 views

Opposite of "Honorific"

I'm wondering if there's a word in English for the opposite of an "honorific". For example, you would call the "Sir" in "Sir Mick Jagger" an honorific. What would you call the modifiers in a phrase ...
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2k views

Participle phrase at the end of the sentence

When participle phrase comes at the end of the sentence, it usually modifies the subject. 1 He smiled nervously with a chocolate in his hands, thinking that the end has come. Here, participle ...
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1answer
324 views

Why is it "five-barred gate" not "five-bar gate"?

Is the "bar" here a past participle? Why it needs to be added an "-ed"? Another example I recently encountered is "pink-haired girl". "Hair" is a noun, why add "-ed"? And we always say "5-year-old ...
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1answer
76 views

Can't see a sentence correction

To work as a loan officer, an education in financial planning is required. I don't see a grammar mistake in the above sentence, if there is any?
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1answer
29 views

Adverb in a prepositional phrase and what it modifies

I am with arguably the best basketball player in the nation. Would this sentence above be correct, and if so, what does “arguably” modify?
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2answers
73 views

What kind of phrase is "...better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder"?

Predictive-policing systems are imperfect, better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder. I know that "better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder." is describing ...
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1answer
270 views

Adverb modifier in action

What does the adverb ever modify in the sentence? “They experienced the coldest weather ever.”
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3answers
470 views

Is that "the most" or just "most" to be used for a superlative of an adverb?

I wonder whether to use the determinant "the" when it is to be used for superlative of an adverb as follows: (A) These neurons innervate most densely to layer 1. (B) These neurons innervate ...
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1answer
646 views

What is the second clause modifying?

I went to swimming pool three times a week through out my childhood, Monday, Tuesday, and Friday morning practices that were exhausting but fruiful. I simply cannot find the clause "a Monday......